Begin a
search

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Results 29401-29450 of 183,203 sorted by date (descending)
Will you be so good as to send me the account of mr T. E. Randolph , & the list of balances due from all persons for rent, firewood E t c of Henderson ’s lands, which were left with you the other day. they shall be returned immediately as I only wish their aid a little while in enabling me to state the whole accounts clearly. I see in your account but one charge for the taxes of the land. but...
Davy sets off tomorrow with a cart for the bigtailed ram D r Thornton was so kind as to promise me. as the post will be with you a day or two earlier I drop you this line to give you earlier notice. I write you more fully by Davy PoC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “M r Joseph Dougherty”; endorsed by TJ. davy : David Hern (1784–after 1829), the son of David Hern
I Take the Liberty of Writing to you if it is posable in your Power to Befriend me I Hope you Will as I am in a Disalut setiation at present I Was Born in the North of Ireland in the year 1770 My Father Having a larg farem after I Got My scooling I was Set to Hard Work I Continued at that to about twenty six years of age then the uniting Buisness Began I was apointed a Capten of a Compney of...
Having accidentally mentioned to my former servant Joseph Dougherty my misfortune in losing both my big-tailed rams, he, in his zeal for whatever concerns me, took the liberty of mentioning it to you & informed me you were so kind as to offer to supply my loss with one from your farm. by the cart which now goes to bring it, I take the occasion of returning you my best thanks for your kindness,...
Having recieved a box of fine Havanna segars & knowing your fondness for them, I cannot make any use of them so gratifying to myself as by sending them to you. having occasion to send a cart to Washington , it will go by Fauq r C.H. to deposit this charge with you. it will return by Dumfries for a pair of Wild geese promised me there, as I have had the misfortune to lose the goose of the pair...
Mr. & Mrs. Gallatin reached us on saturday last; and in fulfilment of their promise to you propose to set out for Monticello, tomorrow morning. We are preparing to accompany them. I see by the papers that Mr Smith has probably recd. dispatches from Mr. Pinkney, by a late arrival; but being in Baltimore, I have not yet heard from him on the subject. The newspaper dates from London were not...
The inclosed Papers from Governor Claiborne were sent to the Secretary of State who returned them yesterday, with a request that the Letter of the 29th July and its inclosures might be sent to you. I have thought that it would not be amiss to send that of the 30th also. With Sentiments of the most Respectful Attachment I have the Honor to be, Sir, Your Humble Servant RC ( DLC ). Claiborne’s 29...
Letter not found. 23 August 1809. Acknowledged in JM to Cutts, 7 Sept. 1809 . Mentions the favorable disposition of some New England Federalists.
M r & M rs Gallatin reached us on saturday last; and in fulfilment of their promise to you propose to set out for Monticello , tomorrow morning. We are preparing to accompany them. I see by the papers that M r Smith has probably rec d dispatches from M r Pinkney
Most respectable Patriot I take the liberty at sending to you by the mail an oration which I delivered on the fourth of July; a liberty which I presumed wants not be received a miss if well intended. Vanity in the author with respect to the merits of the work is not my object, but real information. When I penned the oration it was from the best information I then could obtain. A summary view...
To the inclosed letter, which you will be pleased to communicate to the House of Representitives of the Mississippi Territory, I feel pleasure in adding my acknowledgments for the friendly sentiments expressed in your transmission of the address of that Body; praying you at the same time, to accept in return, assurances of my esteem and of my best wishes. To the Representatives of the...
Yours of the 9 th was duly recieved. having occasion to remit to mr Peale of the Museum Philadelphia a sum of 49 D–5½ C 49 D–5½ C and not being able to get any Philadelphia bills here, I have taken the liberty which your goodness has rendered habitual of inclosing you George town , Alexandria , & Virginia bills (50. D.) the only kinds to be had here, & of praying you to exchange them for a...
You have doubtless been congratulated by many who have better claims to your notice than I have, on your release from the burdens of public life. … Altho I agree with those who believe that your country has no longer a right to claim your service; I rejoice that congress, by authorizing your letters to be franked, has offered to all the privelege of requesting that information & advice which...
Our last account left me some thirty odd Dollars in your debt. I now inclose you one hundred Dollars to cover it. I wrote some little time ago to Mess rs Gordon & Trokes for a supply of groceries & took the liberty of referring them to you as to the most trust-worthy boatmen, mr Randolph ’s boats not being likely to go down soon. a number of others having gone down with the late swell of the...
The Amount of your account I cannot at present exactly ascertain; I believe the Ballance will be about Thirty pounds—six, Eight, Ten, sixteen, & Twenty penny nails of nearly equal quantities would be preferred RC ( MHi ); addressed: “Tho s Jefferson Esqr Monticello”; endorsed by TJ as received 22 Aug. 1809.
I have been for some time endeavoring to procure bills of some bank in Philadelphia to enable me to remit you the balance of 49. D 5½ C due you on account of my grandson . finding there is little hope of this, I have this day inclosed to my friend mr Barnes of Georgetown , bills of that place, & prayed him to exchange them for a draught of the Washington bank on that of the US. at Philadelphia...
This Indenture made on the third day of August one Thousand eight hundred and nine between Craven Peyton and Jane his wife on the one part and Thomas Jefferson on the other, all of the County of Albemarle in Virginia witnesseth that whereas Bennet Henderson dec d of the same county was in his lifetime Seised and possessed in feesimple of a certain tract of land on the rivanna River in the same...
Whereas Craven Peyton has this day executed a deed of conveyance to me for the lands of the late Bennet Henderson surrounding & adjacent to the town of Milton , which deed bears on it’s face a warranty for the parts thereof which were the property of Frances , Lucy & Nancy C. three of the daughters of the sd Bennet , whose shares have been purchased & paid for, but the sd Frances , Lucy & Nancy C.
It is related of Augustus Caesar, that being upon his death-bed, he turned just before he expired to the friends who were standing around, and asked them what they thought of the part which he had acted on the scene of human life—They express’d their admiration as their feelings or their prudence inspired—Then said he “Plaudite”. In the article of Death, Augustus was what he had been...
This will be handed to you by Jos. Tate who, after an absence of fifteen years, returns to the U. S. heartily sick of all he has seen abroad. His story may not be unknown to you, and is less recommendatory than his character. In the five years I have been in Paris, tho’ oppressed by poverty and injustice, his conduct has at all times been regular and respectable. He was the Acquaintance of M....
The title purchased from Henderson’s representatives is so extremely complicated as to render it indispensable to state in the deed all the several conveyances of all the parties; otherwise in case of question at any future time it might be lost for want of knowing it. I have endeavored to do this in the inclosed deed, and in order that you may have time, I send it to you To-day, & pray you to...
the Deed s not given you the othar day are in the office at Charlotesville except M r Henderson s that being in the care of Mr. Hay at Richm d the parts baught of R. Anderson as attorney for Seabrook is not deeded ewing to the circumstance of my objecting to pay for Hills
The Nivellem t Barometrique of Humboldt has this moment come to hand—Having found two Prospectus of the publications made or proposed by Humboldt & Bonplan —I enclose one for you—I remain D sir Your friend & ser t RC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “Thomas Jefferson Esq r ”; dateline below signature; endorsed by TJ as received 27 Aug. 1809 and so recorded in
In the absence of the Secry. of the navy, I have the honor, in pursuance of his written instructions to me, to lay before you a statement of the navy appropriations. By reference to that statement you will perceive, sir, that the appropriations for “Repairs of Vessels” & for “Contingent expences” are nearly exhausted. Under the last law of congress, making provision for these objects, great...
Very contrary to my general practice is the entrusion of my solicitation for the promotion to office of my own relatives, not because there is any thing wrong in it, but because our fondness for those tied to us by consanguinity or marriage, too often blinds our perception of their fitness. In the present instance I beleive I am safe, as my brother Edmund who Aspires to the vacancy on the...
I have had the Honour to receive your kind Letter of the 21st. of April; and now send the last Edition of War in Disguise as you request. As we are turning our Attention to Wool, I have added a Tract lately published here on the Merino & Anglo-Merino Sheep, which may be of use. I trust that we shall continue to cultivate such Manufactures as suit our Circumstances. Cottons now, and Woollens...
19 August 1809, Christiansand. As an addendum to his petition of 11 Aug., communicates a special accommodation issued by His Danish Majesty on 2 Aug. whereby privateering is to be temporarily curtailed. Captains Martin and Ingersoll have been acquitted by the maritime prize court, the confiscation hearing having been appealed to the admiralty court in Christiania. Forwards the enclosed attested...
I enclose a letter received at the society & read last evening—with its envellope— The Rouleau mention’d on the Envellope has not made its appearance & may have been taken on by M Cole or may have come by the Syren , by which Vessel the letter possibly came— But all our packets came by the Mentor —Should you have recieved it, it will after you have Examin’d it be peculiarly acceptable to us—...
The last mail brought me your favour of the 8th of July, with a postscript of the 13th. inst. Whether you had received my letter of the 9th. inst. does not appear by you favour. You request the return of the Letter to yourself uncopied—you will find it enclosed, but if you have no particular reasons to the contrary, you would oblige me by entrusting it to my possession. It contains many things...
Amsterdam, November 17, 1780—wrote to Congress: “From the time of the arrival of my commission, I have been constantly employed in forming acquaintances, making enquiries, and asking advice; but am sorry to be obliged to say, that hitherto I see no certain prospect of borrowing any money at all. For some years past, all the information I could obtain from this country, led me to think that...
18 August 1809, Washington. Relates his financial losses suffered during and after the Revolution. Proposes a survey which would be sponsored by the federal government to create military maps of U.S. territories. RC ( DLC ). 8 pp. Docketed by JM.
Forcée d’abandonner mes proprietes de St domaingue , obligée de sortir de l’isle de cuba ou je m’ettais réfugiée et ou je pouvois sufir a mon existence, me voici maintenent ici dans un pays etrangé pour moi; Dénué de tout, tres agée sans parents sans amis. Mon mari mon unique soutient ayant ete sacrifier par les neigres je me trouve seule au monde. Monsieur Lemerre qui étoit ùn de vos colonel...
It really almost appears as if I shall never more have the pleasure of seeing you at Monticello . M r Gibson when I last wrote you, had not the most distant thought of going to the Springs this season—not having experienced as he supposed; any benefit from his visit the last.—He has suddenly however, by the advice of some of his friends, determined on making one more trial, and is gone. I now...
Inclosed thee will find 300$ it will not be Neccessary to Acknowledge the receipt of the money by Letter as I Expect to Leave the City some time next weak for Shadwell , when I wrote the last we were all in a Pannick at the Prospect of trade Supposing that our produce would be worth very little, but the alarm has now very much Subsided, Flour is now worth 5.75$ at Alex a and it is thought by...
I hope you have returned safe back to Montpelier whither the last papers stated you had again set out. As I conjectured and as I wished, I perceive you have by your recent proclamation renewed the non-intercourse with G Britain. Some of the papers particularly the “Enquirer” with more promptitude than discretion, or judgment; pronounced it beyond your powers. It was hoped & expected that Mr....
I recieved your’s of yesterday by mr. Coles. My journey to Bedford has been delayed by sickness among my laboring people. No new case having arisen for some time, I am in hopes it is at an end. Still no particular object fixing my departure to any precise time, it lies over for convenience, and should I fix a time before we have the pleasure of seeing yourself & mrs. Madison here I shall...
I recieved your’s of yesterday by mr Coles . my journey to Bedford has been delayed by sickness among my laboring people. no new case having arisen for some time, I am in hopes it is at an end. still no particular object fixing my departure to any precise time, it lies over for convenience, and should I fix a time before we have the pleasure of seeing yourself & mrs Madison here I shall...
Alone supported and allmost a stranger to you, I with the utmost diffidence and respect take the liberty to present you the enclosed plan and prospects of a Voyage of discovery to the N.W. Coast of America—I should not have been emboldened to take this step, notwithstanding the repeated entreaties of Gentlemen whom I esteem as my Friends and who pass for men of science, had I not thought I...
Since the loss of that unfortunate though eminent Navigator La Perouse and the expedition fitted out in search of him, no discoveries have been made excepting some accidental ones by Persons whose qualifications and means were illy suited to afford much correct information, whose object was trade and not discovery and whose interest perhaps induced them to suppress much of their knowledge, or...
About 9. O’Clock this Morning we spoke a fishing Schooner from the Grand Bank, belonging and bound to Plymouth—We were in the midst of a thick fog, as we have indeed been most of the time since you left us, and still are. The Schooner was within g speaking distance when we first spied her, and our Captain had barely time to ask them on their arrival to give notice of their having seen us. So I...
1780, November—wrote to Mr. Jennings: “I have received yours of the first. Will you be so good as to explain to me what is meant by ‘Instructions to endeavor to inspire American agents at Madrid, with distrust and jealousy of one another, at present employed in Europe?’ Let me remark here, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. Littlepage are no more. Mr. Jay and Judge Livingston live. It may be in their...
I got home from my trip to Washington on Saturday last; having remained there three days only. You will have seen in the Procln. issued, the result of our consultations on the effect of what has passed on our commercial relations with G. B. The enforcement of the non-intercourse act agst. her, will probably be criticized by some friends and generally assailed by our adversaries, on the ground...
My worthy friend, General Dearborne informed me, that the President of the United States would kindly accept any expression of my sincere confidence in him. The highest esteem & his distinguished reputation & virtues, as well as respect for his high station must oblige me to put all the value of myself, in my own discretion. Permit me, Sir, to say, that during the Administration of President...
We have your favor of 10 th Ins t Contents of which we have noted. And in reply we have to assure you that any supply of Iron you are in want of shall be sent you without any delay or hesitation at all times and you will pay us in such times and manner as will best suit your circumstances. You have been A regular & punctual customer to our house for A series of Years and we should consider...
This will be handed you by mr Bradbury , an English botanist, who proposes to take S t Louis in his botanising tour. he came recommended to me by mr Roscoe of Liverpool , so well known by his histories of Lorenzo of Medicis & Leo X. & who is president of the Botanical society of Liverpool
I got home from my trip to Washington on Saturday last; having remained there three days only. You will have seen in the Procl n issued, the result of our consultations on the effect of what has passed on our commercial relations with G.B. The enforcement of the non-intercourse act ag st her, will probably be criticized by some friends and generally assailed by our adversaries, on the ground...
The titled title to the lands of Bennet Henderson having passed to yourself thro many hands & by many deeds, I wish in the preamble to the deed to state, for each part, the conveyances by which it came to you, as a matter of information in case any of his descendants should hereafter raise a question on it. I have begun it in the following way, which I know to be imperfect. ‘they (that is, the...
I have the satisfaction of advising you of our having reached home in perfect health and safety after one of the most charming excursions we have ever taken. To crown the whole with pleasure we found our little girls as hearty and happy as when we left them, and can, therefore, with full fellow feeling congratulate you and your family on the complete disappearance of indisposition of which M r...
I send you herewith some more of Col Duane’s papers. You will perceive in One of them proposals for republishing you letters in a pamphflet. It was from a Conviction that you saw things with Other eyes than most of the persons that cooperated with you in establishing the Independance of the United states, and that your Opinions and Conduct would bear the Scrutiny of posterity at that eventful...
14 August 1809, Navy Department. The chief clerk transmits copies of a letter from Capt. David Porter and Goldsborough’s reply. Goldsborough has submitted Porter’s letter to the secretaries of state and of the treasury, who have approved his reply. Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 45, Letters to the President). 2 pp. Enclosures not found.