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Results 26201-26250 of 183,253 sorted by date (ascending)
ALS : American Philosophical Society J’aurois eté vous faire mon Compliment de felicitation sur les heureux succes dont l’Europe Retentit sans l’accident qui est arivé a mon Epouse une Epeingle qu’elle a avalé, nous à alarmé pour sa vie. Je profite du premier moment de soulagement qu’elle Eprouve pour me Rejouir avec vous de ce que la Cause de l’humanité est triomphante. Je suis avec Respect...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Je vous prie de recevoir mes complimens de l’heureux succés de l’armé Ameriquaine qui vient de remporter une victoire complette sur les anglois; je vous en félicite. Je désire que leurs conquêtes prosperent de jour en jour pour que les treize Provinces ûnie jouissent de la liberté et de la Paix qu’elles méritent à tous Egards. Je prie M. votre petit fils...
ALS : American Philosophical Society From the Knowledge I have of your Goodness, and the Small acquaintance, I was Hon’d. with by you, at Philadelphia and New York, I hope you will Excuse the freedom I take, in recommending the Bearer Mr. Fowler, who Am Certain, you’l find to be a faithfull Honest Man. I am your Excellencys Most Obliged Humble Servant PS. The Bearer is pofects [perfecting?]...
26204General Orders, 9 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
The tents are near the bridge, on the Skippack road, and so many are to be immediately sent for and pitched, as are necessary for officers and men that have not huts, that will keep themselves and their arms dry: But the General earnestly recommends, that no more tents be pitched than are absolutely necessary to shelter the troops. Neither officers nor men are to be absent from camp upon any...
Letter not found: from Maj. John Clark, Jr., 9 Dec. 1777. In his letter to Clark of this date , GW wrote: “I am favd with yours of 8 OClock this Morning.”
I am favd with yours of 8 OClock this Morning. I fancy your intelligencer is mistaken as to the number of wounded; but they had a pretty warm brush with Morgans Corps, in which he thinks he killed and wounded a good many —Genl Potter is gone over to the West side of Schulylkill again, be pleased to represent the matter of the provision to him and let him know it is my desire that Colo. Rankin...
An Act of the general Assembly passed last Year empowering me to appoint some proper person to reinlist the Virginia Troops. I did appoint General Stephen, & several Letters passed between us upon the Subject, and by an Extract of a Letter from him to me which I inclose, it appears considerable Progress was made by him in that Business. I have heard that General Stephen is no longer in...
The Enemy having returned ingloriously and the season far advanced makes it necessary that the Troops should be fixed to some place for the Winter. I have now thought proper to mention to Your Excellency, a subject that I once tuched on before, which was, that it was absolutely necessary to relieve the Jersey Militia from their constant duty, by Continental Troops to enable them to fill up...
The Senate wish to have their institution clearly understood, and the bounds of their authority marked, satisfied that a wide door must stand open to contest, were this not to be the case. They prize very highly the harmony so justly valued by the House of Delegates; whilst that reigns, the public happiness will probably be most effectually sustained. This principle, so useful in the conduct...
Permit me to congratulate you on your return to your family and frends, of which I am advertised by the weekly Gazette. It must afford not less satisfaction to the state in general to have your presence and council at this critical period, on the transactions of which depend its future happiness and tranquility—than it does to your family and private connections, to imbrace after a tedious...
The fine, impartial, laconic & highly descriptive account you favour’d me with of the last Years Campain, in your letter of March last, excited in me, & many of your other friends here, an earnest desire of farther accounts from your pen of the succeeding fortunes of the Great American War; A War which will, one day, shine more illustriously in the historic page, than any which has happened...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society We consider M. Wuibert as one of our Countrymen. Hundreds of them are in the same Situation. We have propos’d to the British Court, thro’ their Ambassador here an Exchange of Prisoners in Europe. The Proposition was rejected with Insolence. We have no Interest with that Court to procure Favour. That Gentlemen may depend on our taking the same Care &...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Habitant d’un Paÿs voüé depuis Longtems au commerçe et partageant avec Mes Patriottes un Interest bien permis a la deffense des vaillans americains, Il y auroit il de L’indiscretion de ma part, a vous demander, Monsieur, sur le sort de Leurs armes, des nouvelles, que nôtre Gazette nous refuse avec constançe? Elle ne produit que des Lettres de contradiction...
26214General Orders, 10 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
The army to march at four o’clock in the morning from the right —A Subaltern from each regiment and a Captain from each brigade, under the command of a Field Officer from the line, are to assemble at General Knox’s quarters in the morning and remain ’till the Army moves off the ground, and then see that all stragglers in the camp, and its environs, are collected and marched after it—They are...
To his Excellency Gen. Washington Commander in Chief of the American Army. Persuant to your Excellency’s Orders We have consider’d upon a proper Order of March for the Army in crossing the Schulkill & recommend that the Troops march in the following Order Viz. Part of Pennsylvania Militia under Potter first. The Baggage Stores and Park of Artillery to cross at Sweeds Ford setting off at least...
Pursuant to your Excellencys order of the 21st Ulto I proceeded to Jerseys to procure flour or Wheat for bread for the army and also directed part thereof for the purpose of Loading Waggons orderd by the Commissary General to the Eastward, for Salt: being disapointed in a quantity of flour I expected at Easton for that purpose. Mr Robert Willson my assistant purchaser at Hacketts town...
In Consequence of the conferences we have had with your Excellency, and knowing yours and your General Officers opinions on the Subject of our Mission, we have come to the resolution’s contained in the enclosed paper, finding them as far as we can judge most consistent with the Public good. Among the many reasons offered against a Winters Campaigne we were sorry to observe one of the most...
I was honored with yours of the 22d ulto on Wednesday last, but the Situation which the Army has since been in has prevented me from answering it before—Genl Howe had been for some time preparing for a move which every account from the City informed me was intended against this Army. On Thursday Evening he advanced as far as Chesnut Hill and in the Morning he appeared upon the Heights about...
I have the honor to inform you, that in the course of last week from a variety of intelligence I had reason to expect that Genl Howe was preparing to give us a general Action. Accordingly on Thursday night he moved from the City with all his Force, except a very inconsiderable part left in his Lines & Redoubts, and appeared the next morning on Chesnut Hill in front of, & about three miles...
I had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 21st ulto on Wednesday last, but such has been the Situation of the two Armies since, that I have not had an opportunity of answering it before this time. Genl Howe had been for several days making great preparations for a move which they did not scruple to say was intended against this Army, threatning to drive us beyond the Mountains. On Thursday...
AD (draft): Library of Congress; copies: Library of Congress, Harvard University Library The mistreatment of American prisoners of war in England had long been on the commissioners’ minds. In February they had suggested to Lord Stormont an exchange, and the Ambassador had not replied. In April they had sent him depositions to back their claim that the British were behaving like savages, and to...
AL (draft): Library of Congress; copies: Library of Congress, Harvard University Library Receiving frequent Accounts by American Prisoners, who have escap’d from your Goals, of the miserable Situation and hard Treatment of their Countrymen at Portsmouth and Plymouth, we have prevail’d with a Gentleman, Major Thornton, (to us much a Stranger but who appears a Man of Humanity) to visit the...
AL : University of Virginia Library Mr. Franklin’s Compliments to Mr. A. Lee; sends him two Papers containing Facts relating to the Treatment of Prisoners; and begs to be excus’d waiting on him to day at dinner, as he shall be necessarily employ’d at home in preparing Dispatches for England, otherwise the Gentleman cannot set out this Evening nor to-morrow if they are not ready to day, as we...
ALS : David Holland, London (1955) I ought long since to have acknowledg’d the Receipt of the Bills you sent me, in full Discharge of the Ballance of our Account. For which I thank you. I am sorry Lord Chatham’s Motion for a Cessation of Arms, was not agreed to. Every thing seems to be rejected by your mad Politicians that would lead to Healing the Breach; and every thing done that can tend to...
26225General Orders, 11 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
Varick transcript , DLC:GW . GW arrived at Swede’s Ford, Pa., sometime after noon on 11 Dec. and headquartered there for two days.
I have detached Let Coll Temple with a small Party from Matsons to the Lancaster Road with orders to fall in at the Seventeen milestone and proceed down the road on the front of the Enemy (dataching a party to gain their left) and if they are on the retreat to move down & Join me as low as Marian Meeting, Majr Jamison with another party I detached about two or three mile in the rear of this...
I had the honor of receiving yours of the 1st inst. some days since, but the Situation which the Army has been in, must apologize for my not answering it sooner. Genl Howe after making great preparations, and threatning to drive us beyond the Mountains, came out with his whole force last thursday Evening, and after maneuvering round us till the Monday following, decamped very hastily and...
Letter not found: to Lund Washington, 11 Dec. 1777. Lund Washington writes in his letter to GW of 24 Dec. that “Yours of the 11th Inst. is come to hand.”
Printed in The London Evening Post , January 24–27, 1778 From motives of duty, and an earnest desire of mitigating the calamities of war, we proposed, near a year since, to the King of Great Britain’s Ambassador here, an Exchange of prisoners in Europe. The answer we received must have been made known to your Lordship, and the world will judge of its decency. It would have been honourable for...
AL (draft): Algemeen Rijksarchief, The Hague Les grandes joies sont muettes, ainsi que les grandes douleurs. Je vous félicite de tout mon coeur; et Dieu benisse l’Am. unie. En reponse à la Lettre de Mr. A. Lee du 4e. je n’ai rien eu de plus pressé que d’envoyer sur le champ aux gazettiers, tant françois que holl[andois], copie fidèle et exacte, sans changer, ajouter, ni retrancher un seul mot,...
D : Yale University Library <Pennsylvania Coffee House, London, December 12, 1777: I have recently seen a paper supposedly written to facilitate American borrowing. It would do credit to any author; its case for the inevitable growth of America will convince every intelligent reader. Great Britain has achieved pre-eminence during the past eighty years for two reasons, the growth of her...
26232General Orders, 12 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
A careful subaltern from each brigade is to repair this day to the last encampment of the army, to collect and take care of the sick and conduct them to Reading—These officers are to apply to the regimental Surgeons for information where to find the sick of their brigades—Every motive of duty and humanity requires the most exact attention to this order—Drs Draper and Campbell, at Mr West’s...
I had the honour of writing to you the 8th Inst. by Messenger Barry. Your Excellency will find under this cover an important act of Congress calculated for availing your Excellency’s Troops & for depriving those of the Enemy, of the benefit of provisions adjacent to Philadelphia. I beg leave to refer your Excellency to the paper and that you will be pleased to excuse brevity as I am confined...
Letter not found: from Fielding Lewis, 12 Dec. 1777. A two-page ALS with a three-line docket by GW was offered for sale in two nineteenth-century dealer’s catalogs, both of which printed excerpts from the letter. The first excerpt reads: “ as the Enemy have got up their Ships to Philadelphia and it may be necessary to Keep the army near that place to prevent Gen. Howe ravaging the Country ” (...
In consequence of your Excellencys direction which I received to day from Dr Cochran I have given orders to have the sick removed from Trenton—& will immediately direct the removal of those at Princeton, if you think tis absolutely necessary, altho they are now very comfortably situated & it will be fatal to many of them to move. If it can be allowed, I should wish two or three weeks...
In answer to your Favor of to day, I cannot think Princeton under the present situation of affairs by any means a proper place for the sick. Should they remain there they would be liable to be taken. At the same time, I do not wish you to precipitate their removal in such a manner as to endanger them. In respect to the Hospitals at Easton & Bethelem, I also am of Opinion, that they should be...
Yesterday was as fine for Travell as ever occurred at this season of the Year.—I reached Ipswich, and lodged, at the House where I used to put up, old Mrs. Treadwells. This Morning I satt off, in a horrid cold Rain, and after getting wett through all my Coverings, I putt up at our Friend Mr. Tufts’s, having no Courage to proceed farther. Tomorrow Morning, I must proceed. Coll. Doane who was in...
AD : Dartmouth College Library This may certify whom it may concern, that M. Rolandeau, a Lieutenant in the 5th Regiment of the State of Carolina, came to France on some Affairs of Importance which indispensibly requir’d his Presence, and so suddainly that he had not an Opportunity of obtaining his Congé. Of this I am well assured by Persons of great Honour and Distinction here. And as he...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. A. Lee’s Compliments to Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane. He receivd a Letter yesterday from Bilboa informing him, that the ten thousand Blankets for which Mr. Lee had remitted money from the spanish fund were ready to be shipt together with a very great quantity of Sail and tent cloth, Anchors, Cables, Cordage and Dreggs but that they must either purchase...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Though our correspondence be interrupted by the most unhappy of all events, and your mind must be wholly occupied with things of infinitely greater moment than any thing that I can write to you about, you are never long out my thoughts; and I still flatter myself with the idea of seeing you once more. The late news from America has contributed very much to...
Extracted from AL (draft): Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères Le Compte que j’ai a vous rendre M. de ma conference d’hier avec les deputés americains ne sera pas fort etendû. Je ne m’arreterai qu’aux resultats qui peuvent vous donnér et a l’Espagne une notion distincte de leurs dispositions ou plustost de Celles de leurs Commettans. Le memoire qu’ils m’ont remis en dernier Lieu M....
26242General Orders, 13 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
The officers are without delay to examine the arms and accoutrements of their men, and see that they are put in good order. Provisions are to be drawn, and cooked for to morrow & next day—A gill of Whiskey is to be issued immediately to each officer, Soldier, and waggoner. The weather being likely to be fair, the tents are not to be pitched: But the axes in the waggons are to be sent for,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I feel myself much disappointed in not having found you in Paris, as I had expected. Business, which brought me hither, renders it impossible for me to call on you at present. If I can steal a few hours before my return, I shall with pleasure wait on you. Our friend Dr. Priestley was so obliging as to recommend me to you. I send you his letter with his two...
On Thursday Evening I had the Honor to receive your Favor of the 8th Instant. From the Several Letters which have lately passed between Genl Howe & myself, I am fully convinced that any propositions by me to release the Baron St Ouary from captivity, either by an Exchange or on parole would be unavailing. In his Letter of the he has explicitly stated his Sentiments, and has declared himself to...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This may Enform you that I Sailed from Bilboa Novmr. 20 with my pore Nacked Crew by a fafour of Messrs. Gardoquis & Sons that Trusted me with one hundred Pound Sterling to Buy a Little provishing. I fell In with Six fish Vessells from N Foundland affter a Little Dispute Tuck them all and Carred them Into St. andero [Santander]. I oared [ordered] them to...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library; AL (draft): Yale University Library You will be surprised to see, that I am not yet arrived in England. I found my Brother’s wife dangerously ill and could not part with her before all danger was over. I found no letter of you or of any other friend at the post office at Amsterdam. I am now for some days at Delpht with my old friend and instructor Mr....
26247General Orders, 14 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
The regiments of horse are to draw provisions of any issuing Commissary, lying most convenient to them, upon proper returns therefor. Such of the baggage as is not absolutely necessary for the troops, and all the Commissary’s and others stores, are to remain on this side of the gulph. Varick transcript , DLC:GW .
Letter not found: from the Board of War, 14 Dec. 1777. On 22 Dec. GW wrote the Board of War : “Your favor of the 14th Inst. I received on Saturday Evening.”
The difficulty of supplying the Troops of General Burgoyn’s Army with Wood and provisions from the Country in the Neighbourhood of Boston, induces me to request, that you will grant passports for Vessels to be employed to bring them from places on the Coast. I cannot ascertain the number of Vessels that may be necessary for this business, or the names of the persons who may be entrusted with...
Your several favs. of the 28th Novemr and 4th and 5th instants came duly to hand, but the constant motion which the Army has been in since the Rect of them has prevented me from answering them before this time. Nothing but the absolute necessity which the Army lay under for want of Cloathing induced me to send out Officers to make collections, the Cloathier General represented it to me as...