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Results 26131-26160 of 183,496 sorted by date (ascending)
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères We have the Honour to acquaint your Excellency that we have just receiv’d an Express from Boston, in 30 Days, with Advice of the total Reduction of the Force under General Burgoyne, himself and his whole Army having surrendered themselves Prisoners. General Gates was about to send Reinforcements to Gen. Washington, who was near Philadelphia...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society I am sorry that the Miscarriage of my Letter to you has occasion’d you so much repeated Trouble in writing. I therein inform’d you that I had no Authority from the Congress to entertain Officers for their Service, excepting a few Engineers and Officers of the Artillery, who are long since gone: That all others who have passed to America have gone of...
AL (draft): Library of Congress The Bearer of this, Mr. Holcker, is a Gentleman of excellent Character, of great Credit in this Country, and one of my particular Friends. He can give you good Information of the State of Public Affairs here. I beg leave therefore to recommend him to your Acquaintance, and to all the Civilities you usually show to Strangers of Merit, of which you will find him...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Inclosed you have copies of letters which I had the honor of writing you from Portsmouth the latter of which could not have reached your hands as I understand that the mail was destroyed. I sailed from Portsmouth the 1st. Ulto. and arrived safe in this River in the Ranger the 2d. Current having taken two brigtines from Malaga laden with Fruit for London. I...
ALS : University of Virginia Library I have at present to inform you of the arrival of the Frigate Ranger Capt. Jones with the Duplicates of the Dispatches I sent you by Mr. Austin. This Ship left portsmouth the 1st of November but brings not a syllable in addition to what we have had, and as Capt. Jones tells me that his Dispatches were on board before Mr. Austin sailed, I conclude that the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Monsieur votre fils vient de nous apprendre les admirables nouvélles de l’amérique nous lui avons tous sauté au col, et nous voulions allér sur le champ, vous témoignér la joye inéxprimable que nous cause cet événement: il nous a dit que vous étiés fort occupé et que nous pourrions vous gésnér; nous réspéctons vos affaires; mais mon chér papa, mon coeur est...
ALS : American Philosophical Society These Lines will be conveyed to you by the Elector Palatine’s secretary of the ambassy, Mr. David, who setts out for Paris to morrow, and will, I hope, come safe to Hand. What has been the Fate of my 3. last Letters from my House, at Rockhau, near Bienne in Switzerland, written September 21t. and 26. and another the 9th. of last Month, I don’t know. If...
26138General Orders, 4 December 1777 (Washington Papers)
The troops are constantly to have one day’s provisions on hand, ready cooked—The officers are to pay particular attention to this, and consider it as a standing rule, that if they are suddenly called to arms the men may not be distressed. Major General The Marquis La Fayette is to take the command of the division lately commanded by General Stephen. Varick transcript , DLC:GW .
In regard to the Advisability of a Winters Campaign, I answer —In keeping the Field, the hardships on both officers and privates are manifestly great, nor is there an alternative presenting your Excy with less inconvenience, at best you have but a choice of difficulties of which Hutting in the field is in my Opinion the least of the two, and most in Character for the Army. The only Semblance...
I Have Just Recd Information which I Beleive to be the Best Can be Obtaind that the British Army had Last Night Packd up all their Baggage & each Man four Days Provision Coock’d; their Horses hitchd to their Artillery & every Appearance of marching out Immediately But something happening which is Not accounted for the orders were Countermanded; the Reason Assignd to me is they Expect our army...
I am this moment informed that a Ship is arrived at portsmouth with a valuable Cargo of Ordnance & ordnance Stores for the use of the United States. as soon as we are fully ascertained of it measures shall be taken to secure, and forward them to the Arsenals. A large Quantity of Lead is on the Road, which with upwards of one Hundred Thousand Musket Cartridges, will be forwarded from...
If posting the army in a position similar to that I advised in my last letter, be to form a winters campaign, the measure in my opinion is not only adviseable, but absolutely necessary, as the more I think on the subject the more I am convinced that retiring into winter quarters and leaving the country uncovered will be followed with the ruin of our friends, give ease and plenty to our...
Your Excellencys Favour of yesterday I received concerning the Adviseability of a winter Campaign, and the practicability of an attack upon Philada with the Aid of a considerable body of Militia asembled at an apointed time and place. I do ashure Your Excellency I think the object a verry desireable one could it be put properly into execution and without tacking a winter Campaign to it, which...
Your Excellency was pleasd to desire the Opinion of your General Officers on “The Adviseability of a Winters Campaign, & practicability of an Attack upon Philadelphia, with the Aid of a considerable Body of Militia to be Assembled at an appointed Time & place” —I must Confess that to me this Question seems so much interwoven, with the Question Your Excellency was pleasd to put a few days ago,...
The bad State of our Army at present, destitute of Clothing and many other Necessaries the Necessity of its being reunited this Winter that we may be superior to Mr How in the Spring induces me to give my Opinion in favour of going to Winter Quarters. The Attack on Philadelphia, from the best Knowledge I can obtain of the Strength of their Works I must think wou’d fail, the Consequences of...
Letter not found: from Richard Peters, 4 Dec. 1777. GW wrote to Peters on 14 Dec. that “Your several favs. of the 28th Novem. and 4th and 5th instants came duly to hand.”
In answer to the question Recevd by note from your Excellency yesterday —a winters Campain I am Sure it will be attended with the Graet loss of our numbers as to the Militia troops their is but little Dependence upon them in Case you make an Asolt upon Philidha besides if the Rivers Should be froze over the Enemy Doubless will Contract lines & make their Situation nearly as Strong as it is...
your excelancey by your letter of yesterday Requested my sentements on two points. first the advisabelity of a winter Campaign secondly the Practicability of an Attact upon Philadelphia —Ass to the first of these points my Sentiments is that a winter campaign is Practable—I confess the verey thought of a winter Campaign in our Sercumstances appeers dredfull But it is liek meny other Evels,...
I made a report to your Excellency immediately on receiving intellegence of Mr Zulinski’s affair. The same dragoon who was witness to what happened I sent with my Report, with respect to Mr Zulinski’s behaviour on the occasion. It was not as Mr Moylan has represented. The encounter was accidental. Neither had Mr Zulinski any other design than to retaliate on Col. Moylan in the same manner that...
Tho’ the Consideration of a Winters Campaign, & Practicability of an Attack on Philada have been so lately proposed, every Gentleman who extended his Views beyond the present Hour, must have turnd his Thoughts upon these Subjects so as to be able to form something more than a sudden Opinion. There cannot be any Person, Sir, either on a publick or private Account, upon whom the Motives for a...
I recd Your Excellencys letter of Yesterday. I well remember the proposition made. I then thaught there was a probability of Success in Such an attempt, but after Your Excellency returnd from Reconoitring the Enemy’s Lines and hearing Your oppinion with regard To their Strength, I lost every Idea of a Winters Campaign. I must confess I never Promised my self any Certainty of Success In it. But...
It will be unnecessary to point out the sufferings of the Continental Troops, from their various hard Duty, & distresses for want of Cloathing, particularly in the Articles of Blankets, Shoes, Stokings, the most essential part to enable them to encounter the severity of a Winter Campaign, and the improbability of procuring those necessary Supplies, without which our prospect of success in an...
Agreable to your Excellenceys Directions I have Considered upon the Advisability of making a winters Campaign and the practicability of making an Attack upon Philadelphia with the aid of a Body of Militia to be Called in for that purpose. Though The Attacking & carrying Philadelphia is an object much to be wished yet as the attempt carries with it an Idea of a winters Campaign I must give my...
I am not for a Winters Campaign in the Open field—the Distressed and naked State of your Troops will not admit of it. But if taking post at Willmington & the Villages in it’s Vicinity—or Hutting at the Distance of about Twenty Miles West of Phila. (which will not only support the Honor & Reputation of Your Army in the eyes of the Enemy—and the States of Europe —but will give Confidence to...
I have from the first moment it was Suggested to your Excellency, “that an attack on Philadelphia this winter with the aid of Militia was practicable and promised success,” kept in mind the desirable Object; have compaired and viewed it in every light, and on every ground I could place it, and after Mature consideration on the matter cannot promise a single Advantage that would justifie the...
I did not recieve your Excellency’s Letter till my return from Head quarters last Evening, or I should have comply’d with your requisition sooner. I have before given my reasons for being against exposeing this army to a Winters Campaign in their present condition. I would add to them the present Temper of the Soldiery, who I am convinced are very generly against it. The practicability of an...
The Committee appointed have according to order prepared what they think may be proper to be offered at the conference which is to be desired with the Senate on the subject matter of their amendments to a resolution of the house of delegates for paying to Thomas Johnson the sum of £15-5-6. The house of delegates has desired this conference in order to preserve that harmony and friendly...
French translation: Public Record Office Lord Stormont, when he sent this translation to London with a dispatch of December 6, described the recipient as Franklin’s intimate friend. We are inclined to think that friend was the Chevalier de Kéralio who has not yet appeared in our volumes but whom Franklin had certainly met either through John MacMahon at the Ecole Militaire, or the dowager...
Copies: American Philosophical Society, Library of Congress Once the news of Saratoga arrived, the French government lost no time. This polite note arranged a meeting the next day, which revealed that a turning point had come in Franco-American relations. Gérard began the interview by telling the commissioners that Maurepas and Vergennes had sent him to congratulate them and to ask for any...
AL : National Archives I had the honor of writing to you yesterday by post under cover by Mr. Williams. I inclosed copies of two letters which I wrote you previous to my departure from Portsmouth, together with a plan which I drew up at Philadelphia on the Regulation and Equipment of our infant Navy. I now inclose you a letter which I had the honor to receive in charge from the Secret...