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Results 29401-29450 of 183,203 sorted by date (ascending)
I am directed to transmit to Congress, and the Commander in chief of their troops, printed Copies of three Conciliatory acts of Parliament; Let me add my most sincere wishes that they may produce the desireable effect which is hoped from them. I have the honor to be sir your most obedient and most humble sert Copy, DNA:PCC , item 152; copy, DNA:PCC , item 169; two copies, P.R.O. , 30/55,...
Letter not found : from Henry Clinton, 3 June 1778. On 6 June, GW wrote to Clinton acknowledging receipt of “your two Letters of the 3d Instant.” The first, enclosing Parliament’s conciliatory acts, appears above; the second, apparently “on the subject of prisoners,” as GW says in his letter to Clinton of 6 June, has not been found.
Yesterday evening the enemy began to demolish their new Redouts about dusk I moved down with a small party of horse in order to alarm them and make discoveries—found two parties very busy—the horse charged within musket shot—the enemy ran in great confusion—the drums beat to arms—after some time they moved the lines—we returned with 4 valuable horses in the night one of my spies came to me,...
Passy, 4 or 6 June 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:127–128 ; not sent. The Commissioners appealed “for an immediate Exchange of Prisoners in Europe.” They protested the treatment of American prisoners “in a manner unexampled, in the practice of civilized Nations” and promised...
Since my last under the 31st May, I have had the honor of presenting Your Excellency’s sundry favours of the 21st 28th 28th & 31st Ulto & 1st Instant. these are dispersed in the hands of Committees and at present I have only to forward to Your Excellency, the undermentioned papers. 1. Establishment of the American Army by Acts of Congress of the 28th & 29 May & 1st June —about 200 Copies. in...
Passy, 4 June 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:127 . Replying to letters (not found) from Bondfield of 26 and 30 May, the first enclosing accounts for the purchase of supplies for the Boston , and the second reporting on the conspiracy against the Boston and enclosing an affidavit...
Mr. Loring having been sent by Sir Henry Clinton to meet Mr. Boudinot or any other person appointed by me for the purpose of effecting an exchange of prisoners; I have therefore to desire you (Mr. Boudinot being absent from Camp) to hear any proposals Mr. Loring may have to offer on this subject; and to do definitively whatever may be necessary towards the execution of a general exchange of...
In the Name of His Excellency General Washington and by virtue of His authority to me, I declare, that on his being properly notified of time and place, he will appoint a person then and there to receive all Prisoners of War, in possession of the enemy, at present in the city of Philadelphia, and that He will return as speedily as possible an equal number of prisoners of war, in lieu of them,...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: National Archives <Passy, June 4, 1778: We have received your accounts for supplying the Boston ; some of the articles are dear, but we trust you to obtain everything as cheaply as possible. Your bills will be paid, and we hope the ship has left by now. You tell us of a plot against her, and we have forwarded the affidavit to the ministry;...
ALS : Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copy: National Archives <Passy, June 4, 1778: We enclose the copy of a letter from Capt. Whipple, which contains all the intelligence he brought.> Published in Butterfield, John Adams Diary , IV , 127. In Arthur Lee’s hand, signed by him and Adams. To BF above, May 31.
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania En accompagnant les Incluses de M. Stockton, qui m’a eté particulierement Recommandé, Je dois Vous dire qu’il m’a fait confidence de ses Engagements avec M. Wm. Lée; et des inquietudes qu’on luy à donné trop tard, sur son caractêre, en l’informant avant son départ de Londres, de la Réputation des deux Freres. Je n’ai pas pu en consçience le consoler,...
29412General Orders, 4 June 1778 (Washington Papers)
The following Resolve of Congress, the Operation of which has been heretofore prevented by the particular Circumstances of the Army is in future to be punctually observed. In Congress Novr 19th 1776—Resolved, That on any sick or disabled Non Commissioned Officer or soldier being sent to any Hospital or sick quarters, the Captain or Commandant of the Troop or Company to which he belongs shall...
The inclosed, just came to hand from Genl Maxwell —no truth in the report, of flatbottom’d Boats, being brought round into Princes Bay—a small Sloop, still keeps her station in the Kills. A Report prevails here, that the Enemy have evacuated Powles-hook, & withdrawn their troops from Fort Washington, those & many other particulars, shall be informed off in a short time, as a proper Person is...
You are to proceed in the most expeditious manner, with the party under your command, to Reading, where you will meet Capt. Hutchins of New Hampshire, with three Waggons under his charge. Upon delivering the inclosed to him, he will put the Waggons under your care, and you are to proceed immediately with them to York Town, and upon your arrival there, deliver the Contents of them to the Board...
Mr Loring having been sent by Sir Henry Clinton to meet Mr Boudinot or any other person appointed by me for the purpose of effecting an exchange of prisoners; I have therefore to desire you (Mr Boudinot being absent from Camp) to hear any proposals Mr Loring may have to offer on this subject; and to do definitively whatever may be necessary towards the execution of a general exchange of...
I take the liberty to transmit you by Express, the inclosed packet, which just arrived at our advanced post by a flag from Sir Henry Clinton. I also transmit a Copy of a Letter I received from him, of the 30th Ulto and of my answer; likewise Copies of his and Lord Howe’s Letters which came to hand by the present flag. The packet, I presume, contains Acts similar to those sent to me. I have the...
I am ever loath to intrude on your Excellency, as I well know the great embarrassments attending your important sphere do not admit of any unnecessary or fruitless Correspondence, but I am as sensible of your attention to the most minute Circumstance which has a tendancy to promote the common Cause, therefore permit me to inform your Excellency that the want of Smelters of lead is the only...
In consequence of the foregoing Letter, I have directed Mr Asa Benton, a trusty Person and well acquainted with Salted Provision &c. to raise Twenty Coopers, which he has effected, and they will March to morrow for Head Quarters of the Grand Army. When I left Your Excellency, I expected to have return’d to Camp before this time, and have made ample Provision for supplying the Army with Food,...
Copy: Library of Congress <Passy, June 5 [ i.e. July 4–5], 1778: “Plan for expeditions submitted to the American Plenipotentiaries and to the french minister of Marine by Com. Jones.” Three fast frigates with tenders might burn Whitehaven and its fleet, rendering it nearly impossible to supply Ireland with coal next winter. The same force could take the bank of Ayr, in Scotland, destroy the...
Three ALS : American Philosophical Society With unfeigned timidity I once more venture to address you, apprehendsive of your thinking me troublesome and impertinent, after the discouragement I ought to recieve from your silence to 3 of my letters; Yet Gratitude for my revered Doctor’s frequent instances of ever paternal indulgence to me, in the earlier, and happier period of my life, not I...
Your favr of Yesterday came safe to hand. What the real designs of the Enemy are remains yet to be discovered. Appearances and a thousand circumstances induce a beleif that they intend thro’ the Jerseys to New York. Your last intelligence however is a lot to this opinion, inasmuch as it contradicts a former report of their assembling a number of Boats in prince’s Bay —That they will either...
I imbrace this opertunity to writ to Your Excellency by Major Conway who goes to Camp for sundrys the 4 Regts are in much want of. I have no intiligence from the Enemy that will alter what I sent by way of General Dickeson. They are lying verry still at Coopers Ferry and as far as Coopers creek & bridges where they keep a guard or centrys, in short they give us no opertunity to pick any of...
it is witth great Pleasure that I now Sit down to write a few Lines to you to inform you of my hea l th & Situation which I like pretty well but I had by much rather be amongst the rugged rocks of my own native town than in the gay city of Paris. yesterday my Pappa received a large number of news papers from america but the 2 armys were then in the Same posture as they were when we came but I...
Upon my Report to His Excellency Sir Henry Clinton of our meeting yesterday at the Sorrel Horse for the Purpose of settling an exchange of Prisoners— I am directed to acquaint you that all our Prisoners in Philadelphia agreable to the enclosed Return shall be sent out on the 12th Inst under a proper Escort to the two miles stone on the Lancaster Road over Schuylkill, provided you agree to meet...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This will be handed you by Doctor Jacob Rieger who goes Via France to Germany to look after a small Patrimony he has there as well as to improve himself in his Profession. He served a regular and faithful Apprenticeship to your old friend my Father, who is very well. I shall be exceedingly obliged by your introducing him to some Medical Gentlemen in France....
ALS : American Philosophical Society We took the liberty of writing you sometime ago in regard of some French officers that were going to America with Captn. De La Plainne and who wanted us to answer for their passage to the master of the Ship which I wou’d not do without having your orders on that account since which time have not been favour’d with your answer. The Congress Friggat the...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library I find, you guess easily how that you have just receiv’d a bundle of gazettes from America. You won’t be surpris’d at my offer for the translation of any article or Essay you may want to be publish’d and at my readiness to print them in the Pamphlet of affaires de l’angleterre et de l’amerique . As soon as you can spare them, Such as you’ll be pleas’d...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Library of Congress I hope we shall at length get forward with the Exchange of the poor prisoners which has been for so many months in negotiation. I am authorized by the administration and the board of admiralty to make the following proposition, That you should send to me the number and rank of the prisoners which you have on your side to...
29429General Orders, 5 June 1778 (Washington Papers)
A Court of Enquiry whereof Coll Wigglesworth is appointed President will sit tomorrow morning at ten ôClock at the Presidents Quarters at the request of Lieutt Coll Duplissis to enquire into his Conduct on the different occasions mentioned in a letter from the Commander in Chief to Congress in his behalf and into the Truth of the Facts on which the Representations contained in it were founded,...
I am glad to find by your letter of the 28th Ulto that your health is so far reestablished as to allow of your returning to active duty—at the same time it gives me concern to be informed that you have any disinclination to rejoin your Regiment, and the rather as I have no prospect of your being otherwise employed—It remains with you to determine whether the differences which you have had with...
Since my last from this Place I have been under the necessity of making a journey to Newbern in North Carolina to obtain from the Loan office at that Place money for an order, sent me (by Col: Baylor) from Congress; and being unfortunately taken Ill on my return have been detaind near a fortnight longer, than I should have been, which has been the reason of my not writing to Yr Excellency...
Since Closing my letter to you of this day Mr Addison Lewis of my Regt has applyed to me on acct the Rank which he appears most certainly to be entitled to on the Promotion of Capt. Lee, he being now the Oldest Leiutt in the Cavalry. I must also beg leave to Inform yr Excelly that Capt. Lewellen Jones is under nearly the same Predicament, he being the Oldest Capt. of Cavalry in the Service....
I this day recd yours of the 2d instant. The Arms arrived at Camp yesterday. If you will advert to the copy of the orders sent by Majr Taylor after Mr Lansing, you will find that I had every reason to think that the Arms were going back to New Burgh by your orders. He is so pointed, that he says in a P.S. “It is Major Genl Gates’s positive orders.” If he by making use of your name, when he was...
I had the honor of writing to Your Excellency under yesterdays date with a p.S. of this Morning by Saxton. A Report on Your Excellency’s Letter of the 1st Inst. relative to measures necessary to be taken in Philadelphia in case the Enemy shall abandon that City had been considered in part yesterday & I had entertained hopes the whole would have been determined this Morning, but other business...
I have Just received a Letter from Colonel Thomas Palmer one of the Commissioners appointed to Carry into Execution the Law for Compleating the Continental Battalions raised by the State of New york —Who informs me that all the Drafts from that State which Can be Collected without a great deal of Difficulty have been Sent forward for this place except a few who I Suppose are now on their way,...
As a general opinion prevails that the Enemy will quit Philadelphia, I take the Liberty of transmitting you my reasons why it is probable they will not. In your difficult and distinguished Situation every hint will be useful. I put the immediate cause of their evacuation, to be a declaration of war in Europe made by them or against them: in which case, their Army would be wanted for other...
William Erskine Esqr. who is appointed Military Surveyor and Geographer is now here, endeavouring to arrange that department—fix upon the proper number of Deputies—and settle their Pay, appointments &ca. To do this, he would wish to see and consult you. I therefore desire you to come down immediately upon the receipt of this. If the movement of the Enemy from Philada should oblige the Army to...
In your last of the 2d Inst., with which I w⟨as⟩ favoured, you advised me that the motions of the enemies ships were closely watched: That 40 sail had passed Wilmington and anchored two miles below New-Castle. As it is of much consideration t⟨ mutilated ⟩ the number that have passed thro’ the Chiveax de frize, and their present position , I would therefore wish to have the matter attended to...
I had Intelligence yesterday afternoon from Newcastle, that upwards of one Hundred Sail of Transport Ships lay off reedy Point, the Admiral off New Castle, & that upwards of fifty Sail more pass’d down yesterday; I have not heard from that Quarter to Day, I have understood that a draft of Marines from each Armed Vessel was ordered up to Philadelphia, and Capt. Rumford informed me four Sloops...
I have been favoured with your’s of this date and approve of your coming on. With respect to the Stores taken in the prize, I wish you to give direction to Mr Wade to have them brought on to the Army. The Salt, and Tea will be particularly useful. The party, who took them will be paid for such Articles as the public get. I am Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt sert P.S. On reflection the Sloop & Cargo must...
I am now to acknowledge the receipt of two of your favours, during the session of Assembly, but there being little to communicate to you, and that, being a busy time with me, has prevented my doing it sooner. The Assembly rose on Monday last; their only act, which can shortly aid our army, was one for raising a regiment of horse, which, I think, will be raised as fast as it can be accoutred....
29442[June 6. 1778] (Adams Papers)
We wrote the following Letter We had Yesterday the favour of your Letter of 31st. of May, from the Harbour of Paimbeuf, and We congratulate you, on your safe Arrival in France, as well as your fortunate Passage through the dangers at Rhode Island; but more especially on the honor, which You, your Officers and Men have acquired, in your gallant Rencounter with the Enemies Ships on that Station....
I often envy you the pleasure you enjoy in being at a place where you with pleasure look around you upon the rugged rocks & homly pastures & what is of more Consequence you can Converse with Mamma Sister & brother these are pleasures that are not exceeded by all the gaiety & riches of europe. your buisiness & mine are upon the Same foundation to qualify ourselves to be useful members of...
Passy, 6 June 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:129 . The Commissioners, in reply to Schweighauser’s letter of 1 June (not found), directed him to provide, frugally, whatever repairs and supplies were needed by the Providence , newly arrived at Paimboeuf near Nantes, and promised to...
Passy, 6 June 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:128–129 . The Commissioners congratulated Whipple on his escape from the British blockade of Rhode Island, voyage to France, and arrival with the frigate Providence at Paimboeuf, all of which had been recounted in his letter to Benjamin...
I am not favord with any of your Commands since the 18th Ultimo. All the advertizements containd therein are at Sea and some of them far advancd on their Passage. I had the honor to write you the 12. 16. 26 and 30th Ultimo per post which I suppose got duely to hand, to the last I shall be confirmd next Post as the honor paid to my drafts will be notified me by the Holders. Since Cap. Tuckers...
Marly, 6 June 1778. printed: JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:129–130 ( JA ’s English translation); for the French text, see JA, Works The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author , ed. Charles Francis Adams, Boston, 1850–1856; 10 vols. , 7:15–16....
L (draft with Franklin’s alterations): Library of Congress; copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives (two) <Paris, June [6?], 1778: Because of a number of British seamen are now American prisoners, we renew our request for an immediate exchange in Europe. To send men three thousand miles to be exchanged would be an unnecessary addition to their calamities. We have authentic...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; two copies: National Archives <Passy, June 6, 1778: We have directed Captain Whipple to apply to you for himself and his prize; please furnish the Providence with whatever she needs, but exercise the frugality that our distressed circumstances require. You ask how you should act toward the customs. In general our warships must comply with the law;...
AL (draft): Massachusetts Historical Society; copies: National Archives (two), Yale University Library <Passy, June 6, 1778: We congratulate you on your gallant encounter with the enemy, and on your safe passage and arrival. Address yourself and your prize to Mr. Schweighauser at Nantes; he will help you repair and supply your ship, but you should exercise the frugality that our distressed...