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I have the honor to transmit to you, a letter from Governor Telfair of the 20th of July, containing enclosures relative to the murder of a Creek Indian. The measures which he has taken to discover the murderer and his abettor and bring them to punishment, seem to be satisfactory and to preclude the necessity of any thing further being done on the part of the general government. As to the...
Having countermanded the March of the three Eastern Regiments under the Command of Lieutt Colo. Vose and directed them to Halt at Morris Town in the Jerseys where I am informd that Colo. Ford at the head of a body of Militia has taken Post. You are to repair immediately to that place & take upon you the Command, not only of the above Regiments, but of the Militia also, and therewith to give...
As the Convention of the States is expected to meet in this City in the next Month, I make bold to request your influence with such Gentlemen of your acquaintance as may want Accommodations. I have fitted up Chambers in the most convenient manner, and am certain that they will find it more agreeable than any private Lodging House in Town, as they will always have more Attendants, should their...
[Philadelphia] 4 Jan. 1793. Presents his compliments and writes that “The Statements went in yesterday, and are copying for the President.” LB , DLC:GW . Hamilton is referring to the four statements that comprised his “Report on Foreign Loans” of 3 Jan. to the U.S. House of Representatives. For the text of Hamilton’s report, see Syrett, Hamilton Papers, Harold C. Syrett et al., eds. The Papers...
As Mr. Alston is already known to you no introduction or recommendation from me can be requisite. I have great pleasure however in expressing the high opinion which I entertain of his character and his talents. He is justly considered as a great acquisition to the Cause of republicanism. I had not the pleasure to see your friend Talliafero. The letter which you did me the favor to write in his...
Mr. Glendye a presbyterian clergyman from Ireland, who settled two or three years ago at Staunton about 40. miles from this place, understanding that there is or will be a vacancy at Baltimore, proposes to go there to offer himself. my personal acquaintance with him is small, but I have had abundant attestations of his character from others. he is a man of excellent character, goodhumoured,...
On my return last evening from Atkinson where I have passed the last eight days in company with your brother Thomas I had the pleasure to receive your letters of the 23 & 24 ult. with Mr. Tracy’s speech for which I am much obliged to you At present I have only time to say that Mr Stedman was the writer of the letter alluded to in mine of the 13th—Russel when he shew me the letter did not...
27824th. (Adams Papers)
One of the breast plates was broke, and we were obliged to send it a mile and half to be mended this morning, before we could proceed on our journey; so it was past eight when we left our tavern. Before one, we came to a very good inn: the best I think, that we have found on the road except Mr. Hall’s. We had come 16 miles without stopping, and therefore we concluded to dine there. Between 3...
279[Diary entry: 27 January 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 27th. Thermometer at 30 in the Morning— at Noon and at Night. Clear and pleasant all day; Wind at No. West in the forenoon and Eastwardly afterwards, but not much of it. Mrs. Washington set out after breakfast for Abingdon—to see Mrs. Stuart who is ill. I rid to my Mill and to the Plantation at Dogue run—also to the places where the Muddy hole & ferry people were at Work. Mr. Shaw...
The house of Representatives want Yet four members and the Senate two. The first will not be formed until Monday, and the senate probably not untill Wednesday next the first of April. Colo. Hanson of Alexandria is so good as to take charge of the cloth sent you from the Hartford manufactory, and also of some federal buttons manufactored in this City, both of which will I hope safely reach you....
Tho late, I congratulate you on the revocation of the French decrees, & Congress still more; for without something new from the belligerents, I know not what ground they could have taken for their next move. Britain will revoke her orders of council, but continue their effect by new paper blockades, doing in detail what the orders did in the lump. The exclusive right to the sea by conquest is...
By the Contents of Sir Guy Carletons Letter which came inclosed in yours of this Day, I find it is unnecessary for you to proceed to Phillips’s House—Sir Guy being disappointed in not obtaing Passports for M. Chief Justice Smyth to come out, he will not, he says, trouble an Officer of your Rank to be the Bearer of a Bundle of papers only—but adds that they shall be sent out in the ordinary...
This morning we received your letters of the 26. Jan. and 18th. Feb. Your plan of leasing your lands is exactly what I would wish to adopt with Edgehill after reserving a farm of 400 acres for myself and what I should put in execution immediately if I could get tenants. Do not you offer yours on very low terms? I have had very lately an application for a farm in the S.E. angle of my tract...
In a late communication from Col Hawkin⟨s⟩ I received copies of a corrispondence between him & the Govr. of Florida by which it appears that the Govr. had notified Col Hawkins of his having been informed that Bowls had crossed the line into the Territories of the United States, and requested the Col to make every exaction in his power for having him apprehended. I have written to Col Hawkins...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society; Copy: Library of Congress I received the honour of yours dated the 7th. Inst. acquainting me with the Presentation of several more Bills drawn on Mr. Laurens. I think you will do well to accept them, and I shall endeavour to enable you to pay them. I should be glad to see a compleat List of those you have already accepted. Perhaps from the Series of...
I sincerely hope that you have, on your arrival, found Mrs. Eppes in a fair way of recovering. The weather and city have been gloomy enough since your departure; and Mrs G. is anxious that I should take her to New York. If I can possibly complete in time the business and arrangements resulting from the laws of last session, I will try to do it early enough to be back here when you shall...
Mrs Bingham has done me the honor to deliver me your Letter of the 15 March with the Seal you have been so polite as to present to me—and for which you will please to accept my thanks I could only wish the object had been more worthy the great talents shewn in the invention and execution of the Seal. You will however believe that I feel my self extremely flattered by this mark of attention and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Vous me trouverez bien ingrat de n’avoir pas encore été me mettre à vos pieds et vous témoigner ma reconnoissance. Une multitude d’occupations m’a dérangé jusqu’à présent et m’a privé du plaisir que j’aurois eu à remplir ce devoir. Je vous prie, Monsieur, d’en croire ces protestations et tous les regrets que j’en ai. Je me dédomagerai au premier moment en...
I have received your favour of the 22.—Mrs Adams, Mr Charles and Miss Lousia, arrived on Wednesday the 24th after a tedious Passage of five days from Newport. We are all very happy. Mr Samuel Tufts needs no other merit but that of being your Brother, to convince me that he has a great deal: but if he is a Candidate for any Employment he must apply directly to the first Magistrate. The...
The President’s message in answer to the call of the House respecting Genl Wilkinson has condescended to notice me. It is expressed in such a manner as not to leave it altogether certain, whether it does not hold me accountable for a bundle of Mr. Clark’s papers, before the public. On the one hand I place a value upon a good name, and on the other am elevated above much anxiety, by the...
The distressd situation of Officers and seamen obliges me as one of their Comanders to call on your Excellency for Redress. I can asure you Sir it is with greatest unesiness I undertake the disagreeable task of writeing to you on [a] Subject so distressing to every friend to his Country, and particularly to your Excellency under whome we fight and whome we look up to for Justice. This is the...
Remarks on the Resolution of Congress of the 25th February 1780—requiring each State to furnish certain species of supplies for the support of the Army. The measure seems to be calculated, more for the convenience of each state, than for the accommodation of the service. The aggregate quantity ordered, tho’ far short of the demands of the army, is proportioned on the states, in such a manner,...
Your Excellency’s dispatches on the subject of the Troops of Convention have been received. I am exceedingly obliged by the favourable sentiments You are pleased to entertain of my disposition towards prisoners, and I beg leave to assure You, Sir, that I am sensible of the treatment, which those under your direction have generally experienced. There is nothing more contrary to my wishes, than...
Being just returned from German Town, I beg leave to inform your Excellency that I was happy enough to perfect the Exchange of the following Officers, for those of equal Rank due to us from the Enemy, which I hope will meet with your Excellency’s Approbation. I have the Honor to be Your Excellency’s Most Obedt Hble Servt ALS , DNA:PCC , item 152; copy, DNA:PCC , item 169. The accompanying...
The only additional inquiry, which I have been able to make, concerning Mr S——l, was from Mr Brown; who thinks that the inclinations of that gentleman are strong towards peace; but that he would not hesitate to contend with zeal for any boundary, which his instructions might prescribe. Indeed, if a doubt of his tendency on this head should be considered as the only objection to him, I suspect,...
I have been honored with the receipt of your letter of the 21. of March, inclosing a copy of an act of Congress which authorizes the President to accept of such Company or Companies of Volunteers, not exceeding 30,000, as shall make a tender of service. The present state of things on the western side of the Mississippi, as far as I am advised, authorizes a hope that no difficulty will shortly...
Mr Burr’s respectful Compliments. He requests Dr. Hosack to inform him of the present state of Genl. H. and of the hopes which are entertained of his recovery. Mr. Burr begs to know at what hours of the [day] the Dr. may most probably be found at home, that he may repeat his inquiries. He would take it very kind if the Dr. would take the trouble of calling on him as he returns from Mr....
As the only friend and acquaintance I have now remaining in Philadelphia, I take the liberty to enclose to your care, for publication, an Advertisement , trusting from your general disposition to oblige, that you will excuse the liberty, when I inform you, that it proceeds from a desire in me to procure the best price I can, on account of those Lands being the principal part of the fortune...
(I) two LS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; copy: Library of Congress; (II) two LS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; copy: Library of Congress I have left the enclosed Letter open for your Excellency’s Perusal and am to request that you will be Pleased to apply to the Court and learn what Opportunities may Offer for making the Shippments of Money within directed. The Alliance was...
I was pleased to hear of your alertness in marching to Pattersons Creek upon the last alarm; and doubt not but you will continue to be vigilant and active in the service of your Country; as that is the most certain road to merit applause. I am informed that Mr Parker continues on his place, and has a quantity of Grain: If this be true, I would advise that a party of about twenty or twenty-five...