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Results 4721-4750 of 183,158 sorted by editorial placement
Amiable tho unjust Portia! doubly unjust!—to yourself, and to me. Must I only write to you in the Language of Gazettes, enumerating, on the Part of Britain, Acts of Deceit, Insolence and Cruelty; or, on the part of America, Instances of Patience under repeated Losses, Fortitude under uncommon Hardships, and Humanity under the grossest Provocations to Revenge? Must I suppress Opinion, Sentiment...
Since my last I have had the inexpressible Pleasure of yours of the 25 of March by the Way of Holland, which is the first and the last Letter as yet received from you. This will be delivered you by a young Gentleman by the Name of Archer who is going to America, to serve in our Army as a Voluntier. He is a promising Youth, and will tell you all the News, both in England and France. —Germany...
I send Josiah Spear, the bearer, to inform you of the Agreeable news of the Arrival of Mr. Adams in France. A London News paper taken Out of a prize from London which Arrived Yesterday att Salem says that Mr. Adams Arrived in France the 15th. Aprill, and brings Accounts that the Commissioners saild Ten days before this Vessell.—I congratulate you on so Agreeable intelligence and are Yr. Uncle...
At length my anxiety is relieved and the happy happy tidings of your arrival and safety in France has reachd my Ears and blessd my Eyes. By an English paper taken in a prize and carried into Salem, under the Paris News there is mention made of my Dearest Friends arrival at the abode of the venerable Dr. Frankling.—What have I not suffered for this month past? The Fear of your being finally...
I know not whether I ought to reply to your favour of April the first, for inded Sir I begin to look upon you as a very dangerous Man. It was a Saying of a very corrupt Statesman that every Man had his price, had Sir Robert Walpole impeachd mankind with a universal Love of Flattery I believe his assertion would have been more agreable to Truth, but I suppose he was judgeing others by his own...
I inclose £23:3:10—Twenty Pounds, seventeen Shillings being the Amount of the Account against Mr. Hancock—and two Pounds six Shillings & ten Pence the Difference in favour of Mr. Adams on Settlement With Mrs. Turell. Turells Account as You will see by the Account and Receipt herewith sent being £6 10s. 6d. His Note with Interest was £8 17s. 4d. Be pleased to credit Mr. Hancock in the Books for...
Shall I tell my dearest that tears of joy filld my Eyes this morning at the sight of his well known hand, the first line which has bless ed my Sight since his four months absence during which time I have never been able to learn a word from him, or my dear son till about ten days ago an english paper taken in a prize and brought into Salem containd an account under the Paris News of your...
As I have so often troubled you with my fears tis a debt I owe your patience to communicate to you my happiness. To a Heart so susceptible as the person I address I need not discribe the joy I experienced this day in receiving Letters from my dear absent Friend informing me of his Safety and Health. He arrived at Beaudeaux the begining of April and reachd Paris the 8th, but I know not what...
I have this Afternoon received your Favour of June 12th. and at the same Time a Gazette from Boston, of later Date, in which I find a pleasing Entry in Regard to Mr. Adams’s Arrival in France. It is so likely to be true from the blundering Manner of it that I venture to congratulate you upon it. Mr. Thaxter is not yet arrived here, but is expected hourly. He will heartily participate in the...
Permit me to congratulate you on the safe Arrival of Mr. Adams at France. It is an event that has relieved many of his friends from pain­ ful anxieties. I could have wished for the happiness of communicating the very agreeable intelligence to you. I hope it has reached you before this date. His arrival was taken notice of in the French papers and also in a London paper, which have been...
I heartily congratulate you upon the indubitable Proofs of our Friends Arrival in France. You might imagine that the Congress had received some important Intelligence in the large Packets sent lately from Boston, if I did not acquaint you that they were chiefly for Monsr. Girard who is not yet arrived. A french Fleet having sailed for America, an English One being ready to follow, and a second...
I had been so short a time in this place when I wrote you last, that it was out of my power to furnish you then with any particulars respecting the enemy’s conduct during their continuance here. By enquiries and observations since, I am enabled to give you some particulars on that head. The City in general has escaped, but houses and fences detached from the Town have felt the wantoness of...
By Mr. Tailor, who has promised me to deliver this with his own hand to you, or distroy it if necessary, I take the liberty of writing rather more freely than I should otherways venture to do. I cannot think but with pain of being debared this privilidge, the only one left me for my consolation in the many solitary and I may add melancholy hours which pass. I promissed myself a negative kind...
In my letter of the 11th. inst. I mentioned the arrival of the French Ambassador at Chester. I am now to inform you that on the 12th. a Committee of Congress, escorted by a party of light dragoons, waited on him at that place to accompany him to this City. About two o Clock the same day he entered the City. The usual military salutes were paid him by two detached parties that were previously...
It is with great pleasure That I write to you who have been so good and kind to me for which I fear I Shall never be able to repay you. I wrote to you just before I came from america which you have not answer’d but my Pappa received one from you about a week ago in which you said you was so much hurried that you could not write to me for which I was very Sorry for I Should take a great deal of...
I have not wrote you so soon as I should have done, if I had known where to have directed to you, but your kind favours of july 6 and 10 which reachd me yesterday leaves me no longer at a loss. I will not leave you any longer in Suspence with regard to your worthy parent who has happily recoverd from the small pox. I omitted writing before not being willing to tell you that he had so...
Yours of the Tenth of June by Captain Barnes was brought to me Yesterday, which is only the second that I have yet received from you. The other is of 25 March. I have written to you, several Times, as often as I could, and hope they will arrive. I have put on board one ship, all the Articles in your Minute. By Captain Niles I have sent you a smal Present of Tea. By Captain Barnes, I will send...
Vous avez eu la bonté de me confier M. votre fils. c’est pour lui donner toute l’education possible, je me ferai honneur de mettre ses talens à profit je crois que vous devez être satisfait; pour le mettre au Latin j’aurois désiré qu’il entendit un peu mieux le françois et qu’il ait plus de facilite à apprendre par mémoire. il travaille et ne perd point de tems, il faut esperer qu’avec la...
The News of your Arrival at Paris gave us great Joy. Before your Letters reached America, the first Intelligence of your Arrival was obtain’d from an English Paper taken in a Prize. Previous to this in a New York Paper was inserted the Capture of the Boston by a 60 Gun Ship but no mention being made of her Contents more especially of a very valuable Article too important to have been passed...
I have long wished for an Opportunity to write to you but the thousand things that have surrounded me have prevented. Mr. Williams has promised me to write you concerning your Affairs and I suppose he has done it. I am not able to inform you of anything concerning them. There is a Society here resembling the Society of Arts &c. in London. It is called “Le Societe libre d’emulation.” It gives...
I am desirous of conveying to you, in a manner that will not probably fail of success, and therefore have written the same Thing by many Vessells. I have ordered some Things to be shipped to you by two Opportunities. But least these should not arrive, or whether they do or not, I beg of you to draw upon me, for one hundred Pounds sterling which shall be paid at sight. Any Person who has...
you will pardon me if I do not write to you very often for you know how I used to teaze you to write a copy of a letter for me but now I do not have you to write and my Pappa being always a doing publick affaires or a writing to you cannot do it for me, so that I am obliged to think myself, sometimes I think of a few words to write but you know I am no great hand at letter writing for if I was...
I have neither Time, nor Confidence enough in the Opportunity, to write you any Thing more, than an Assurance that We are all well, anxiously wishing for News from America. 3d. June is the last We have had from Boston. Not a Word of D’Estaing. Never was the Spirits of a Nation, higher than the French. Never Nation had more Cause for Dejection than England. They are now censuring Keppell, who...
by your desire I now sit down to write a few lines to you and not yet having wrote to you I cannot let this oportunity pass without writing. my Pappa has received two or three packets from my mamma in which she said our family and Freinds were all well as I hope this will find them. I have nothing material to write having given an account of my voyage and travels to my Mamma. I am your...
I set down with great pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from Mr. Adams dated February 8th, with a poscript from you, which through a Mistake, or neglect in the post Offices did not reach me ’till the 10th. of this instant. I hope it is not too late to thank you for them both. The remedies you have demanded to releive the anguish of your mind occasioned by parting with your dear...
This Moment your favour of August the 6 is come to hand. My Heart reproaches me that I have not before this time told you that according to the Scotch Song “I had banishd all my Grief for I was sure the News was true and I was sure he’s well.”—Indeed Sir I have been so much absorbed in my own happiness and so selfish that I have scarcly thought of communicating it. But a debt of gratitude is...
I really began to feel very uneasy at your long Silence and feared Sickness or some disaster had befallen you. I have been a journey, and absent about a fortnight as far as Haverhill, and upon my return I expected to have found Letters in Town, for so long a Space has not intervened since your absence, but to my no small dissapointment I could not hear any thing from you, but I will not...
If I knew of any more endearing Title I should certainly give it. But this appears to me to express the Truth, the whole Truth and nothing but the Truth. It is at this Time a very still season for News. We are all Impatience to hear from America, having nothing certain since the 3d. July. My Son is well, and servant, and both behave well. The first is in high Reputation here.—Please to draw...
Your favour of the 5th instant is just come to hand. I should like very well to see the Speach you mention and the reply, but would not desire it till you have full Licence to communicate it.—I wish I could give you such intelligence from Rhode Island as I hoped to, but not withstanding we have men of Sence and Letters, many of them there, we do not get Authentick intelligence. Tis a week...
I shall inc l ose by this Opportunity, by Mr. Ingersol, Son of Mr. Ingersol of Connecticut, the late Judge of Admiralty at Philadelphia, but very different from his Father in his political sentiments, the Journals of Paris. But must refer you to the Public Papers for News. Indeed there is a Famine for News at present, here and in England. Not a Word from M. Destaing, nor from America since...