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Results 1921-1970 of 183,496 sorted by recipient
The Opportunities for writing to you are now so frequent, that it is impossible, to avail ourselves of them all—They are indeed principally from Liverpool, through which place, I have for the last two Months and upwards sent Letters or despatches almost every week—There are however occasionally Vessels going from the Port of London, and by one of them I now write—I have determined to forward...
I enclose a letter from my brother, received a day or two ago—You will be gratified by the perusal of its contents. In Wayne’s paper of last night, herewith enclosed, you will find a letter from Mr: Thomas Pinckney on the subject of the letter published in the Aurora, by Tench Coxe, signed John Adams: Mr: P—— is not intemperate in his remarks, but he promises to investigate. If he intend s...
I had the happiness of receiving your excellent letter at Middleton, for which my heart is alive to gratitude. My dear Connexions were thankful for your kind rememberance of them. We returned home last week, & expect to set out for Portsmouth next Mony, when we hope to have the satisfaction of passing some social hours at Your Mansion. Excuse the brevity of this my Dear Friend, as many cares...
I received a few days ago your kind letter of 29 January. After having been so many months without a line from you, it gave me sincere pleasure to see your hand-writing again, though I could not but sympathise with the afflictions under the immediate burden of which it was written—I have cordially and deeply lamented my poor brother, and will obey your injunction respecting his child. I learn...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
This morning I had the satisfaction of receiving your kind letter of the 21st: ulto: which partly relieved me from the anxiety occasioned by the letter of a previous date from my brother, mentioning your illness and confinement—The weather has of late been so remarkably fine and mild in this quarter that I hope its benign influence has been extended to your regions, and has restored you...
O how happy should I be, were I to sit down to write you of my dear sisters better health, but alas I cannot. She fails every day & has now grown so weak that she is not able to writte out or even to come below stairs. She still keeps her usual flow of spirits, & she sits “like patience on a monument, smiling” even tho in the arms of death. How miserable should I be, my aunt, in seeing my dear...
I am sorry that we are again obliged to postpone our visit to you at Quincy, as George is this day breaking out with the meazles—His symptoms however are favourable, and we hope he will have the disorder lightly—I send out by William the two turkies and a fish. There is no Cod at market, for which reason I send a haddock—You will also receive a Rochefort cheese enclosed in a leaden cover—Of...
I live in that retired manner that affords much time for reflection, which must be my apology for addressing you at this time, as memory has been so kind as to present you very frequently of late as one that has ever taken an interesd in my welfare. And I can say that Friendship has indeed been the Wine of life to me. I feel that you are not indefferent to the happiness of me and my dear...
Your letter of 22d Ulto: so marked with sensibility—so tender in expression, towards the offspring of the lovely friend, whose loss you so deeply deplore, excites the deep & ardent gratitude of myself—my brother & my wife.—the late call she had opportunity to make was delightfully satisfactory to her feelings & be will reiterated by me the first moment that can present itself.— Your assurances...
I have a thousand things to tell you and but a few minutes to write. We arrived in this city Fryday Evening about seven O clock—the first week we had most beautiful weather & found the roads most excellent—the President said he never knew them to be so good but the snow made them as bad as they were before good. We had not been in the house but a few minutes before his Excellency the Govenor...
I received yesterday your kind letter of 17th. instant, informing me of the death of my dear and venerable father, and of the hopeless state of health of my dear Mother. I rejoice and am thankful that my father was not left to linger out a painful and solitary existence deprived of the dear partner of all his comforts. which It seems like a special interposition of the all–merciful hand. My...
Your ready reply my dear Madam to my last forbids a delay on my part to cherish a correspondence that has given reciprocal pleasure. When I see the glow of friendship kept alive in the bosom of the few left of my former associates it is a powerful stimulus to take up the pen. It is to me indeed a pleasing occupation when this can be done unincumbered by ceremony. When the mind feels itself at...
Mr Tarbell informs me that he and his Lady have determined to return to the United States, and that they expect to sail next Monday for from Liverpool. I have now barely time to tell you that we are all well, and to send you a Newspaper, and the last number of the Quarterly Review—We have received Letters from my father and brother, and from you, to the 27th. of May—If the intervals between my...
I did not my dear Mrs. Adams, write by yr Son when last in Plymouth, because I wished to retain the very valuable Letters of the American Minister at Petersburg, a little longer in my hand.—I wish’d my Son Winslow and his father to peruse them, which from sickness and other causes they could not do immediately.—I have not communicated them to any eye but those of my Son’s, though I think them...
Your kind favor of the 14th of this month, was very gratifying to me. Nothing can be more interesting then the account which it gives of the Presidents visit to Boston and the vicinity. The letter from Mr Adams which you were so good as to enclose, I have to apologize for not returning sooner. I desire to thank you for the opportunity afforded me of perusing it. There is an impressive wisdom...
After I had closed my last Letter to you dated 1st. October, I received on the same day your favour of the 30th. August, and some day’s afterwards the collection of Pamphlets on the late Trinitarian controversy, they were brought as far as Liverpool by Mr. Cary, who survived the Passage across the Atlantic, but who was not destined to reach London alive. he died at Royston on the road from...
My brother is no longer with me. Eight days ago he left me to take somewhat of a circuitous route to Hamburg, from whence he embarks for America, and where I hope within two months from this date, he will deliver you the present Letter.—He had been for rather more than four years, (with two short intervals) my constant companion.—I had neither a thought nor a paper, upon any subject, public or...
The River being open at length, and the Vessels preparing for their departure, I sieze the earliest opportunity of writing, to assure you that the family are generally well, and that we have all excepting Mr Gray, suffer’d very little considering the length and severity of this tedious Winter.— I wish my dear Madam I could write any thing that would amuse you, but our lives are so uniformly...
After a long period of deep concern, and anxiety, on account of your health, I feel myself in some measure relieved by the receipt of your kind letter of 2nd Decr:, which I received the day before yesterday, that which you mention as having written me on the 15th of November, has not yet come to hand. At the same time, I received from Mr. Pitcairn at Hamburg a line, mentioning, that the vessel...
I am to thank you for the kind wishes contained in your favor of the 24. of last month. You have often, indeed, gratified and flattered me by similar ones, and I feel how much I owe to your over partiality. The appointment of Mr Adams gives, as far as I can ascertain, the highest satisfaction. If ever a citizen of our country owed his elevation to the solid merits of his own character, your...
To day I re ceived your Letter with its contents all safe, & thank you for your care & for your obliging me with the perusal of your Son’s excellent Letter—I consider every word as Truth —a just representation of the state of our affairs, of which we have little, I believe in our public papers—I have not time to say now what I wish—I shall inclose his letter, for dear you may want it, & the...
Though the Season has returned when the genial warmth of the Sun, invigorated our chilled Blood, yet we find the Cold still presides, & makes me exclaim in the language of a late Poet, Ah! Why, unfeeling Winter? Why still flags thy torpid wing? Fly, melancholy Season, fly And yield the year to Spring. With us the travelling has been very poor, high banks of Snow, & much bear ground—Till this...
I hope my Dear Sister has had her Cup of happiness filled, by having an amiable long absent Son, with his wife & little One, sit at her Thanksgiving Table. I have not heard of his return from Washington, but presumed it would be an object with him to be with his beloved Parents upon that Day. I thought of the pleasurable Circle, & sincerely wished myself one of the Affectionate Band, for I...
I have been prevented waiting you since my arrival in Connecticut by the increased weakness and inflammation in my eyes; & I am now under the necessity of employing an amanuensis. My needle, (in which I have taken so much pleasure), is now wholly laid aside, & even writing I have been obliged to give up for this last fortnight. You have daily lived in my remembrance my dear friend, & since I...
I have perused the Letters from Russia which you were so good as to forward to me, I submitted them as you requested to The perusal of the Vice President, who when he returned them, he expressed his thanks for the confidential communication & observed “they develope the Character of the british administration, as well as the opinions of our friend Mr. J. Q. A. on the subject” I have a Letter...
I am at present much occupied in closing the military scene here, I shall effect it fully on the 14th. conformable to the wishes of Government—there is every appearance of its being closed with military propriety— concluding the perusal of the enclosed would give you pleasure, I transmit it—it might perhaps not be amiss to put it in one of the Boston papers.— Mrs: Smith and Caroline are well...
As I am in the City for a few days, you may wish me to write rather oftener than usual, to convince you that I am not ill. The weather since the month of June has been generally more than commonly favorable for this climate—It still continues so, and we begin to flatter ourselves that the City may escape the afflicting scourge it has heretofore experienced. The mortality which lately prevailed...
A Letter which I had a long time wished for, I at length received from my affectionate Sister. Every day I had been thinking I would write. But the round of duties that called for my unremitted exertions; left me too weary, or too inert to take up my Pen, for the company which our Boarders attract, demand polite & respectful attentions from me, by their own obliging behaviour— And I thought...
I have just closed a letter to the Prest. on the subject of my Bror. Greenleaf. I do not know whether I have not said too much, but if I had not been restrained by a sense of Propriety I should have beg’d & pleaded that he might have some appointment or other. I consider him as a man of uncommon abilities and attention to Business, & he has no means of exercising his Talents at present, having...
Your Billet of the 18th ulto, was handed to me this day, on my return from a Short Journey, I have found the letter Madam, which you alluded to. It was printed in October last, the other side is nearly full of Electionering for President &c—It contains one advertisement, which I think may lead to a possession of Said letter—Vizt Lost Out of my pocket this afternoon in some part of George Town,...
As the Galen is about to sail my dear Madam I hasten to inform you that we have at length received the Watches sent by Mr. Brooks at which we are much rejoiced as they have proved a source of great anxiety to the younger branches of the family. The fashionable Season being over I have little to communicate that can afford you amusement and Mr. Adams informs you so regularly of every event that...
Tomorrow we leave this place with the intention of visiting you in Boston if nothing should intervene and force us back again to Washington. We shall be in Boston the latter end of the next week as we propose to leave Philadelphia on Monday Morning—Our visit will necessarily be short Mr. A—— being obliged to return the beginning of next Month—we therefore wish to be as short a time on the road...
I will not suffer the first day of this new year to pass over, without renewing to my dear Mother the expression of my fervent prayers to God, that it may be a year of health enjoyment, and every blessing to her and to my father, as well as to my beloved children who are with you, and to all the family around you—And with the hope of auspicating it to us all, I join that of having once more...
My wife’s brother J. B. Johnson has written from New Orleans, to his sister and me, requesting us to send him our Portraits, and we are accordingly sitting for them to a young American named Locke, who is working hard to make a reputation as a Painter.—This is the second time that according to a melancholy yoke of poor Sheridan’s, I have undergone the operation of sitting for my Picture,...
I have received and thank you for your favor of the 6th: currt. This day, twelve months ago, I left Philadelphia to visit my friends, in N. England, but however strong my inclination to see them often, I must forego that gratification for the sake of bettering my condition here. Should any serious cause occur, such as the yellow fever, (of which we have already had some alarm), which should...
Last Tuesday the Horn blew to announce the Departure of the Mail an Hour sooner than the usual Time, which obliged me to break of abrubtly, even without any Signature—Though I suppose you would know from whom it came, by the badness of the writing, & local Circumstances—I find since my last Fall sickness that my hands tremble more than they used— Not received a Letter from you, nor my Cousin,...
I now enclose you my Brother’s letter of July the 10th: which I promised to transmit by this day’s Mail; but being anxious to see a considerable portion of it in print, & solicited by Mr. Dennie to furnish him a copy for the Gazette of the U.S. of Monday next, I could not complete the copy in time for sending, so that I am apprehensive you will not receive it until after the President’s...
I have received the things you sent me by Townsend and my Aunt Cranch with your letter of this morning and the shirts, for which please to receive my thanks. I find this town so very noisy and the present situation in which I am so very different, on many accounts from any in which I have ever before been, that it will take some time before I shall become naturalized. This circumstance and not...
Nothing could compensate so much for the disapointment of my Son’s not bringing your Caroline with him as the flattering letter he brought me from you, I Cannot describe my feelings when reading it, your Sentiments of him coincided So much with mine, that I could not help exclaiming he is all that this good & venerable lady thinks of him, to hear him praised for qualities that grace human...
I received with much Gratitude my dear Madam your Affectionate, & condoling Epistle of the 8th. Dec. last, & should long ere this, have acknowledg’d your kindness, had not the situation of my mind, in addition to my ill State of health, rendered me unable to perform the task; you, my dear Madam I hope, will make Just allowance for me. I know no friends for whom my dear departed Husband felt so...
I have been honoured by your Letter of the 18th—I have noticed its Contents, I consent to your wishes, and I will smother my own, if my heart cracks—My Idea of happiness rests on the ability properly exercised—to promote the happiness of others, whenever I am furnished with this ability I exercise it, and consider myself obliged by the oportunity, I have written to Mrs. Smith, & you will...
Your favour of 15. August, a few days since received informs me that even that you had received no Letters from me, later than these of March, which were sent by Mr. W. S. Smith—I know not how it happens that one of 22d. April which I gave to Mr Crawford had not reached you, so long after the arrival of the Neptune; but I have already explained to you, how it happened that the one of 7. May,...
On my return home from the eastern Circuit in the night preceeding Commencement, I found myself honored by your favor of the 5th. inst:, acknowledging the receipt of mine of the 23d. ulto:—I beg you to accept my sincere thanks for your attention to its contents, & for the political information you have been pleased to communicate, more especially for the Confidence manifested towards me, by...
Yours of 25 Ult. is received. Thomas is to Sett off from N York to day from for Quincy and I wish him a pleasant Journey, which the fine Weather and convenient Snow promises. An happy Sight of his Friends, will come of course, without Accidents. He found his Father, forty Years Older than when he left him, and if he finds his Mother advanced only ten, it may be an agreable disappointment to...
A few days since, I received your kind favour of 25. ulto: and am greatly rejoyced at the restoration of your health—But I have delayed answering it hitherto, because as the Session draws to a close, we find ourselves more driven for want of time; in addition to which we have had the extraordinary business of trying an impeachment, and I have been in trouble with illness in the family—Both the...
Mr Ingraham of Boston left this place a few days since, and I gave him a packet for Quincy, containing letters from me to my father and my brother, and to you from my wife and from Catherine— I had shortly before enclosed a letter for you, to a friend in London, to be forwarded, and I shall dispatch the present probably by the way of Archangel— Notwithstanding the numerous accidents which have...
Nothing further received from you, since I wrote you last week—My boys have returned to School; and to close their holidays I went with them to Drury–Lane Theatre, and saw the Tragedy of Richard the third—The part of this amiable hero, was performed by Mr Kean, who is now the reigning favourite of the Public—They have mutilated this Play so much in their manner of getting it up, that it is...
I hope you enjoy your health at this time & that it will be confirm’d to you & that your journey will be agreeable, and a happy meeting with the President, You will excuse the Liberty I take in requesting the favour of your influence with the President for the Office that Son Fitch Hall is desirous of obtaining I should be very happy if he could gett it, I wish him well & should be glad if he...
My daughter Cuthbert has written to me declaring her wishes to make me a visit this summer if one of her brothers can meet her at the lines, it is necessary for me to write immediately to her to settle the plan of meeting—I again solicit your good offices to send it to the gentleman who has been so good as to send others for me. I was paind to hear of the illness of yourself and my venerable...