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I consider Your opinion on the Subject of War—as expressed to me in the Letter you did me the honor to write of the 6th Inst—So just—& So decisive—that I am confident of it was published as an extract of a Letter from you—to A.B—in this County—it would do great good, in bringg. back many deluded by the farci c al Washn. benovolents—whereas I consider them the real Jacobins—& Tories of Our...
Agreeable to the kind intimation you was pleased to do me the Honor of making the last time I was with you, has induced my taking the liberty of troubleing you to acquaint that I am on the eve of my Departure to the East Indies, and God knowes I hope to be of some usefulness to the United States in that Country —if sincerity of Attachment to them can have any influence over the People I am...
I wrote you a letter on the 27 th of May , which probably would reach you about the 3 d inst. and on the 9 th I recieved yours of the 29 th of May . of Lindsay’s Memoirs I had never before heard, & scarcely indeed of himself. it could not therefore but be unexpected that two letters of mine should have any thing to do with his life. the name of his
Your favour of the 25th: found me, in the midst of parliamentary contest, which occupied me too intensely to admit of that early acknowledgment, which a deep sense of the honour, you have conferred on me, dictated. The battle has raged, with some warmth; and it has been my fate, to be in the hottest of it. Whether my exertions were as wise, as, I am sure, they were, well intended, I confess, I...
We arrived here last Evening at six oClock. This Morning We have a Sky and Air truly in the American Style. We have been to a Lecture, where many curious Experiments were made by the Professor of Medicine Mr. Horne. At four Clock We go to a Law Lecture. I have engaged two Rooms at fifteen Guilders per Month, in the same Lodgings with Mr. Waterhouse, whom I find very polite and attentive. On...
I am, indeed, gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 27th ulto. The approbation of those we ourselves reverence for their virtues, is, perhaps, the sweetest reward for our efforts to be useful. Only eleven volumes of the Weekly Register are yet finished. These may be forwarded, if you please, immediately to Boston, & can be easily sent to you, through Mr. Dawes, or by my agent there,...
When you permited me to become your correspondent, I did not intend that it should be so long before I claim’d the privilege. But ill health, and an attention to the duties which you assign’d me, have hitherto deprived me of that gratification. On the 4th. of March, after dinner, I went to the Presidents house to take charge of the boxes which you left there in the morning. I found the house...
The last letter, which I had the honour to receive from you, dated January 3d, I have before acknowledged. Permit me to remind you, that I have in expectation something farther from you, concerning the misnamed Aristides. I am perfectly ashamed to speak to you again of my Chathams, but it is unavoidable. The three concluding numbers, the printers refuse to publish. In two of them I had...
The only apology I can offer for troubling you is, that, I know, your highest gratification is to promote the welfare of the United States, over which you preside with so much wisdom and dignity. The annexed piece was written out for publication; but, as I am of opinion every good citizen ought to beware of unnecessarily agitating the public mind in such a government as ours, I anxiously...
Monsieur Le Cte. D’orvilliers m’a renvoyé la lettre que vous lui avez ecrite au Sujet des Matelots Américains qui peuvent Se trouver à bord du Vaisseau le fier Rodrigue. Empressé d’aller au devant de tout cequi peut concerner le Service des Etats unis de L’Amérique, et particulierement de cequi peut être agréable à Votre Excellence, j’ai Sur le champ marqué au Capitaine du Vaisseau Le fier...
In obedience to your command, I have endeavoured to give to the important question you were pleased to suggest—Whether it would be proper for the President to recommend, in his speech to Congress, a declaration of War against France, all the consideration permitted by the shortness of time, & my own scanty means,—the result, I will now do myself the honor to lay before you. Knowing that this...
I did myself the honor to address a note to you under date of the 16th. Inst requesting permission to use part of your Letter to Col. Putnam—Since which I have recd. a Letter from Col. Putnam covering one to you which I forward; saying he had “presumed to make use of part of your Letter without your permission” As Col. Putnam has made use of it—(which I most sincerely hope will meet your...
We duly received your most esteem’d favour of the 10th. of this month to us in particular, and to our Society with Messrs. Willinks and de La Lande & fynje. About the latter we’ll have a conversation this evening, and give your Exce. a proper answer probably to morrow. In the mean time we most humbly thank your Excellency in our particular for the kind assurances, which you are pleased to give...
I must beg the Liberty of introducing to your acquaintance, Capt. Harry G. Livingston of New York. He is a young Gentleman who has not been sparing of his Time nor fortune in the publick Service. He is recommended by the provincial Congress of New York as a Lieut. Colonel. There are few young Gentlemen better qualified than he is, as he has been indefatigable in acquiring the military Art...
The enclosed letter to Genl. La Fayette, has been occasioned by the recurrence of our national anniversary, & contains a printed copy of the Address I delivered on that day. If there be nothing improper in the request, and I assure you, that I cannot perceive its impropriety; I pray you to favor me with the facilities at your disposal, to ensure its safe conveyance to him. I send you a copy...
I send you with this letter a copy of the 2d. edition of Arator, neatly bound, together with a Bill for the two other books I sent you & this; and as I shall not have an opportunity very speedily shortly to receive payment thro’ any agent in Boston, you will be pleased to avail your own convenience to make payment—either through any representative in Congress from your State, or otherwise.— I...
Empressé à vous faire plaisir en toutes occasions, je n’ai point tardé a faire envers le Gouvernement General des Pais Bas de la domination de S. M té l’Empereur Roi, les demarches requises pour que non Seulement l’expres chargé de vos effets detenus à Bruxelles Soit imediatement remis en pleine liberté, mais aussi à ce que avantageat vos effets autant que faire se pouvoit quant aux droits de...
While I was at S t: Quentin the last Winter, I was admitted to see a very large manufactory of Looking-Glass— ’Twas a particular priviledge, and allowed to but very few—yet the Gentleman to whom it belonged allowed me to ask any question—reserving to himself, however, the right of not answering those which should be improper— There were several hundred men at work, and all being in their...
I take great pleasure in introducing to your acquaintance, Mr. David Hoffman, a distinguished Member of the Bar at Baltimore, who makes with his Lady a Summer excursion to our Section of the Union and will deliver you this Letter. I am dear Sir ever faithfully your Son MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Before I enter on the subject for which I have the honor of calling the attention of Your Excellency, I must apologize and ask your indulgence for intruding upon your far more important occupations. I trust, if any thing is amiss in this step, you will, by no means, attribute it to a want of respect; but rather excuse the Feelings of an Officer who, since the year 1765, has been brought up to...
Although I have had the honor to write to you since the favor of your letter of the 4th, I now realize that I did not adequately answer it. I have been unable to procure a copy of the dispatch from St. Petersburg because the plenipotentiaries insisted that it not be distributed. But, in substance, it contains 1. A convention proposed by the Empress of Russia whereby, with the five known...
Much time has elapsed indeed, Since you have favoured me with your last Letters—and more, Since I dropt to you my last line—I do not plead another excuse than my particular Situation—Tho at times I was not in want of leisure, to acquit meself of an incumbent duty, but then mÿ mind was not often enough composed, and a numerous correspondence within and without this continent imposed imperiously...
Yours of Sept. 5. I received the 13th. Instant and rejoice to hear that You are in the Enjoyment of that Family Felicity, which your Scituation heretofore necessarily prevented. The Powers which You have given and the Trust which You have committed to me are great. How well I shall execute them Time must determine. New Care and new Trusts have for some Years past been encreasing upon me , they...
Mrs Cruft and Myself have been very much gratifyed by your present of two Silver cans. & for which you will please accept our united thanks. and be assured Sir, this Valuable token will be held by us in lasting Remembrance of the donor.—We felt ourselves much honord & gratifyed by your Visit, and it will give us pleasure at all times if we can contribute to your happiness by making our house...
I have found a little Inconvenience in having nobody here on the Spot, that I could call my Guardian. I spoke to Doctor Franklin of it who directed me to write to you and to inform you that if you would agree to it he would take me under his Care. I receiv’d the other Day a Letter from my Grandpappa in which he told me that my Father had sent you a large Remittance which if you receive and...
I yesterday received your kind favour dated at Fairfield and am happy to find that you had advanced thus far with no greater inconvenience than Rocky Roads & a Blundering Servant I will take better care of his Horses than he appears to have done of his master, for the old Proverb was never more verified, what is every bodys buisness, is nobodys buisness, than in Roberts going of without your...
We have received here with uncommon Pleasure the Accounts of the Success of your important Negotiations in Holland notwithstanding the Opposition and Traversings of a pow’rful British Party in that Country. By the last Vessel from France, which left Nants the Beginning of June, we are told, that the Independence of these States has been acknowledged by all the States of Holland, and your...
Consideratien op Art. 22. & 23. van het project Tractaat tusschen Haar Hoog Mog. en de Vereenigde Staaten van America. Wanneer men den generaalen inhoud van die twee Artt. admitteerde, en dús van wegens Hún Hoog Mog. toegaf, dat dit geheele Tractaat in alle zyne Clausulen en Artt. nú en voor ’t vervolg verstaan zal moeten worden niet te contrarieren aan de Stipúlatien, voorkomende in de twee...
Out of the circle of your own family, there are none who can feel more sorrow at the heavy affliction that has fallen upon you than we do here. We heard the melancholy news two days ago. “What exalted and long-tried excellence, exclaimed my wife, has gone to the tomb.” “As soon as my confinement was over,” she continued, “I had intended that my first letter, after one to my own mother, should...
From an unfortunate concurrence of circumstances, I find myself under the influence of the same difficult command in corresponding with the Vice President of the United States, which the King of Syria gave to the Captains of his chariots.— "Fight ye not with small or great, save only with the King of Israel."— The subjects upon which we differ are monarchy — titles —& the Latin & Greek...
I received your Favour of the 5th of Novr and the Enquiries relative to Vessels suitable to be armed, Commanders and Seamen to man the same, secure places for building new Vessels of Force &c. are important in their Nature, and to have the same effectually answered I propose to submit them as soon as may be to the Court that a Committee may be raised for obtaining the Facts from the Maritime...
J’ai reçu, Monsieur, la lettre que vous m’avez fait l’honneur de m’écrire le 21 de ce mois. Je me rappelle très bien de vous avoir dit que votre présentation seroit insérée dans la gazette de France; Mais d’après les informations que j’ai prises, je me suis convaincu que jamais les présentations, soit des ambassadeurs, soit des Ministres Plénipotentiaires, n’ont été annoncées dans notre...
After your Excellency’s advice, for which I am much obliged, I wrote, by this Sloop, to his Excellency the President, State the affair, and requested his interference so far, as He maÿ think proper, and I flatter my Self, that it wil be promoted bÿ you in the Same manner. But this occasion Sir! is to favourable, not to make use of it, in enlarging—for a moment upon a particular article of your...
I keep a constant search on foot for the books which in any of your Letters, you have expressed the desire of procuring; but the excessive prices at which all books are held, deters me sometimes from taking those that I find, and I am not always successful in finding those for which I am on the lookout.—The Translation of the New Testament by Beausobre and L’Enfant is in two Quarto Volumes,...
The accounts you give of the Heat of the weather, gives me great uneasiness upon account of your Health. I fear it will through throw you into a fever, or relax you so as to ruin your Health. We have had some extreem Hot weather here when the glasses have been at 92. I have slept many Nights this Summer with all my windows open which I do not remember ever to have done before. Our Hot weather...
Under the present afflicting scene of Providence that you Mr. Adams and connections of the deceased, may enjoy the consolations of religion and every needed support is the devout prayer of / Your symathizing Friend MHi : Adams Papers.
I have the honor of forwarding herewith two parcels addressed to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences at Cambridge & a letter addressed to yourself as President of that Society, which were committed to my charge by Count Rumford. A duplicate of the letter and one other parcel are sent by a different conveyance.With my best wishes for the prosperity of that valuable institution & for your...
At the same time that I make my Gratful Acknowledgment, for the instructive sentiments and Friendly hint, Contained in yours of the 15th March I must ask your indulgence so far as to Favour me with your opinion (by my son who will Call on you on Monday Next) of the present dark and Gloomy aspect of public affairs. Is there no hope that the Dread Calamity of Civil Convulsions may yet be...
So, so master John, your Back is up, because you have not been written to, as often as you thought your dignity required—why I really think there is Some reason for you to complain of your Hingham School Mates—but I beleive they are Scatterd now, not one of them remaining with mr Thimbull who were your companions—new ones Succeed Politeness requires that notice Should be taken of letters of...
Not being in the habit since my return to private life, of sending regularly to the Post Office (nine miles from hence) every Post-day, it often happens that letters addressed to me lye longer there, on that account, than they otherwise would do. I have delayed no time, unnecessarily, since I had the honor of receiving your very obliging favour of the 22d. Ulto. to thank you for the polite and...
Returning the day before yesterday from Boulogne, I had the Honor of receiving your Excellencys Letter by the Hands of Mr. Bowdoin, to whom I shall pay every attention due to your Excellencys Recommendation and his own Merit. Before this comes to Hand your Excellency will have heard of the Disaster in Carolina; the Consequences of which may be sensibly felt by us. However there are Matters,...
I have the Honor to receive Your Letter of the 6 of April. It is indeed a “grave prospect” which is now presented to this Country But I entertain hopes that a wise national conduct, may soon brighten the scene. The French have long been in a political delirium; but if the Americans exhibit upon this trying occasion that wise magnanimity which is worthy of their former character, I have...
I yesterday ask’d Permission to resign my Post of J.A.G. and to retire from the Army, but met with a Refusal, which, though softened by a Compliment from the General, gave me some Chagrine. A Person at my Time of Life ought to be, if possible in the Road to Wealth or Fame, or both, my Office will never intitle me to either. For the Pay annexed to it, from the Depreciation of the Currency and...
Though I have not the Honor of a personal acquaintance with your Excellency, I take the liberty to inclose the first number of a periodical publication. If it shall be seasoned with your Excellency’s approbation, it will be esteemed a Favor, if your Excellency shall condescend, in a few lines, by the Post, to signify your Approbation of the Work, to be published with the impressions in its...
It is impossible for me to express the happiness I feel at the news which comes by so many different channels from Boston concerning you, & which has been so agreeably confirmed by yourself. the rapid improvement which is evident in your style & writing is itself a sufficient indication of the pains you are taking to cultivate your mind, and take all the benefit and advantage which your father...
Seven States only have been represented in congress since October, of consequence very few questions of national importance have been under the examination of this Assembly— The meetings of the Legislatures have probably detained many of the Delegates, but it is expected, that Ten States will, within a short period, be represented—There is some ground to expect that several of the Southern...
I send you the prospectus of a Work I am about to publish—I wish to have your opinion on the subject & if not intruding too much on your leisure I would request some facts relative to the passage of the law & such other information as you Might think would be interesting to the people of the United States—But I fear it would be trespassing too much on your time & subjecting you to...
We are just returned from visiting your good Lady at Braintree, where I had a complaint exhibited against me for not writing to you, which I mean to answer totidem verbis. But before I proceed further must mention, in brief, that news which will be the most important and agreeable of all you will meet with in the letter, viz, that Mrs. Adams and children are well and as chearful as can be...
I received an hour ago your Letters of the 22 d and 27th. I have been anxious enough for you since I saw the proclamation. I advised you to take for your cough Rhubarb & calomil. do not omit it, but take it immediatly. it will serve You for the complaint which usually afflicts you in the spring as well as for your cough. I will obey the summons as soon as possible but there are many...
Mr B. Vaughan presents his respectful compliments to Mr Adams, and having received news of Mrs Adams & Mrs Smith, concluded it had come into his family by a message obtained by his servant. He is sorry to find upon inquiry that it is otherwise, & begs that this circumstance may be accepted as his apology for not having sent earlier to either. Dr. Priestly and Mr Wilkinson &c, were much...