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Since I wrote you last, I have not had the pleasure of receiving a line from you, but as you are the most constant and most frequent correspondent that I have beyond the seas, besides the rule which I have followed of answering every letter by one in return, I shall add that of writing to you by every opportunity that occurs during the Winter—I now write by a namesake of ours a Mr: Adams, from...
The information of your health and safe arrival in the City, communicated to us by my Brother, is very pleasing, to Grand Mama and myself. we offer you our sincere congratulations, and hope that every thing may concur to render your residence there agreeable.—Grandmama never leaves home, I am at present confined with my little Girl. as soon as she is well enough to admit of it, I propose doing...
I received your favor of the 16th: on the 23d: instt:. My time has been so much taken up, during the week past, with removing my Office & lodgings, that I could not conveniently devote any portion of it to return you an answer. I have now obtained an establishment, which has long been the object of my wishes, namely, an Office under the same roof, where I lodge; in a pleasant part of Walnut...
I received your letter of the 14th of Feb. yesterday—I enclosed to you this morning Browns paper containing the report of the committee, to whom was referred the Report of the committee the petitions &c requesting the repeal of the Alien & Sedition bills &c. It was drawn up by Mr. Goodrich of Cont. and is a most masterly production. I think you must be pleased with it. The report was made the...
As Mr & Mrs Smith are about leaving this Country I cannot suffer them to depart without a few lines although my Spirits are not in a state to render a letter from me very agreeable Mr Adams as you probably know has left me in Petersburg and it is very uncertain when we shall meet again; did I not fear to indulge my feelings I could make bitter complaints of the cruel separations I am obliged...
This morning I received the letter, with which you was pleased to honour me the 28th of June. your medical advice, how Salutarÿ in its effect, Should, I believe, not have prompted me to answer it So Soon, had you not destroy’d its beneficial influence—by rousing all mÿ fears for the live of a man, whom you know, I love and revere. By recollecting, it appears to me, that I am unjust towards...
I am very happy to find by your Letter of the 7th that you are kind enough to be satisfied with my efforts to amuse you I am generally obliged to write in so great a hurry that I cannot attend to elegance of style and I believe I cannot always boast of writing sense—I am only guided by the current of my thoughts which frequently flow too rappidly to be perfectly rational—If however they enable...
Your favor of the 19th. Ins. I have received by post. T. Welsh can have his Degree at Cambridge at any time before Commencement, if you think it necessary for him to go before you return I will look out for a passage for him and fix him off.–The Answer to the Address from the Students at Cambridge was recd. & published in one or more of our papers. (It is in the Mercury 5 June.) I think it a...
I recieved your letter dear Madam and should have answer’d it had not the illness of the two children prevented me John was very sick for cutting two teeth but is now perfectly recover’d and larger and fatter than ever George has been very ill owing to a severe cold which occasioned a smart fever for several days which reduced him very much he has not yet left his room but is nearly recover’d...
I have been honored with your favor of the 28th of last month, which got to hand this morning. The wishes of which it makes mention on behalf of Mr. Clarke, to be the bearer of the dispatches by the Chippewa to Spain, I will, with the greatest pleasure, lay before the secretary of state: the testimonials to his merit, and fitness for such a trust are so perfectly ample, that I flatter myself,...
Before I left Philadelphia, I wrote you, expecting the letter would overtake you at Brookfield. The rain on monday prevented our leaving the city till Tuesday, as we had previously intended. The great rains, which they have had this way, have made the roads very bad—they are ploughed up, by the heavy loaded German waggons, exactly like the corn fields in New-England, and you might with equal...
I have received your favor of the 15th: instt: with a curious statement respecting treaties, which I shall preserve. I knew very well you would not like Manlius, as indeed there are not many who do—but the young man, who wrote under that signature has few readers & no opposers, so that his vanity receives very little adulation from public notice. He is a Sensible, and worthy youth, for whom I...
I have long been wishing to find time to give my aunt a history of the visit of Dr. Logan to the president, the monday after we arrived in the city. He began by saying that he was extremely sorry that we are not to have the pleasure of Mrs Adams company this winter in this city. The president thanked him. He then said, that he had just come from France and that he had the pleasure to inform...
After I had written the letter of which I now enclose a copy, intending to have it ready for Mr: Smith, an opportunity was presented me of sending it by another conveyance—and Mr Smith not being ready to go, I dispatched it; so that as he is now upon his departure I shall send by him two letters instead of one, for you—And as the Winter opportunities are so unfrequent, I write by him also to...
I donnot like to let a week pass without writing a few Lines to let you know how we are & what we are about. as to your House if the winter holds on at the rate it has done since March came in it will not be very soon done. we had for two days past a violent storm of rain snow & hail, & tis now very cold. Judge cushing is not yet arriv’d at least I have not heard of them & I think I should if...
At length, after another interval of nearly seven Months since I had been favoured with the sight of a line from any of my friends at Quincy, yours of 29. July has come to hand—It is nearly seven Months old, but is more than three Months later than your last previous letter. As it came under cover to Mr Barlow, I suppose it did not reach Paris, untill after his departure from that City— Thence...
Last week I went to Newburyport to accompany Capt Peabody, when I returned a Letter from my Sister Cranch was handed me, which announced the joyful tidings of the birth of your Grandchild—Most sincerely I congratulate you, & the Parents, who by this circumstance I suppose, are made completely happy—I long to clasp my dear Thomas & Nancys little Bantling to my bosom, I hope it will live, and be...
I shall send you by the earliest opportunity the newly published numbers of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews; but unless you read Cobbett’s New-York Register, you will not have the key to the secret History of those works—There are now three very distinct parties in this Country—Tories, or the Ministerial party—Whigs—and Reformers—The Quarterly Review is the Literary instrument of the...
I have already written you once, by Mr: Gallatin, who, together with Mr Bayard left this City on the Evening of 25. January, for Amsterdam—But as Mr Harris our Consul, who was also the Secretary of Legation to the Extraordinary Mission is to follow them in a few days, and expects to overtake them at Berlin, I consider it as another opportunity for writing to you, and have prescribed it as a...
We have arrived safely at this place after a fatiguing journey owing to the dust and extreme heat of the weather which nearly overcame me and produced so much fever by the time we reach’d New London we were apprehensive I should be incapable of proceeding as I found myself considerably better we took our passage in the Steam Boat at New London yesterday morning at 7. o-clock and reached New...
Mr. Adams’s business accumulates so rappidly and Genl. Jackson has cut out so much new and difficult work for the Government I despair of seeing you this year—Contrary to your idea Mr. Adams enjoys his health hitherto perfectly but I have totally lost the little share I possessed on my arrival in this Country as I now scarcely know what it is to be well two days together—my lungs are very much...
An alternation of six Stages, and six Steam-Boats finally landed us here yesterday afternoon, being the very day upon which I had promised to be here. The President had arrived here on Wednesday, and occupies the official mansion, where I had an interview with him last Evening—But the walls are fresh plaistered, and the wainscoting is new painted; and they render it so insalubrious for present...
Your Letter my Dear Sister, received a week since, flattered me with the pleasing Prospect of our beloved Sisters recovery— though slowly, & feeble, I trusted she might yet be of great service to her family, by her Presence, & Instruction; but your Intelligence by to Days Mail; has damped my fond Expectations—deeply shaded, & almost erased the pleasures of Hope—The sudden & voilent attack made...
I have to thank you for two Letters which lay by me unanswer’d, I have had my hands full of business & my Head of care & one of my hoarse colds to trouble me besides. mr Cranch is still confin’d with his, but I hope will not be quite sick, on the ordination day I could not speak loud enough to be heard & was very much oppress’d at my Lungs, but I could not spare myself. I had the House full of...
A few days ago, I received your favour of 30. December of the last year; after a long interval during which I had not heard from you; and the communication with England from Hamburg having been for six weeks interrupted by the severity of the season, I was nearly the whole of that time without receiving any information from America—When it came at last, it was in one respect, of a nature...
I have yours of 26 by Brisler and that of the 28th. this Morning. Thomas is in Phyladelphia and Brisler with his Family are going off this morning in the Stage. He will write me this Evening or tomorrow.—I expect to hear from you when and where you intend to Set out, and where you intend to be.—The offices of Treasury & State are gone to Phyladelphia. War, Navy & Law remain here, for...
Richard has just brought me your note and I am very happy to hear you are all well. Betsys Mother must be mistaken as to her having had the Measles as she is now confined to her room which we hope she will leave tomorrow she has had them very favorably and at her age I think it a happy thing to have got through the disorder George we expect will have them next Sunday it is unfortunate as he...
I cannot refuse myself the pleasure of answering, your very beautiful, and affectionate letter, of the 24 Feby, although I am at this moment, labouring under one of my severe sick headache’s, which afflict me so unceasingly, in my hair is already perfectly blanched. it is a bad apology for my silence but since I have nursed my little daughter I have suffer’d more than usual and have been...
You know my Dear Sister, that my Heart is ever prone “to rejoice with those who rejoice, as well as to weep with those who have cause to weep.” And I most sincerely lament that your Daughter is afflicted in so grievous a manner, while I rejoice, that she has so amiable a Daughter to attend arround her Bed, & a Son to comfort, & “prevent the asking Eye,” now in the absence of his Father—It is...
Being informed of your intention to stop in this Town on your way to the Southward, you will give great pleasure to Mrs. Marshall and my self by accepting a bed at our house, as we can accommodate you with convenience, & perhaps more agreeably than at a public house; and depending on the honor of seeing you / I am / Madam / Your most humble Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
We have the Pleasure of your Letters to the 3d. I think it is not worth while to bid for Mrs Veseys four Acres. The Price will be twice or thrice the Worth and I have no desire to enlarge my Borders by purchasing such scraps. Indeed I have land enough and too much, unless I could attend to its cultivation.—In that Situation Land is an Object of Envy. And I am willing that some Tradesman should...
To the very much beloved friend of my much beloved mother—of that lamented & departed friend, I must express my acknowledgements of the reception of Mrs Adams’s letter of the 22d.—Long, very long, have I enjoyed the sympathies and regards of my beloved mother & her excellent friend—at all times and in all circumstances, have I heard them express’d, nor at any moment of her blessed life, were...
In my Letter of the 27th. of last Decr: I took the liberty thro you to recommend my friend Major John Hobby of Portland to some appointment in the stamp department of the revenue but I find that business has been annexed to an existing office. I have now to solicit for him one which probably will take place soon, I mean that of a purchasing and issuing commissary ing for the troops which are...
We began to suffer much for want of Rain, having had hot and dry Weather, with but very little Rain from the beginning of this Month to the. 25th. when we were relieved by a plentiful Rain. It has also been rainy through this Day and We have now a fine Prospect of a plentiful Produce— You would wish to know what Progress is made in the Building. I can only tell you that I have spared no Pains...
We Spent Sunday at Stanford at Webbs, went to Meeting forenoon and afternon, and on Monday went to Dinner at East Chester. Tuesday in a Violent Snow storm went into New York. Dined and Slept at Charles’s. Wednesday crossed the Ferry and went to Elizabeth Town. This day We came five and thirty miles to this Place. From New York our poor Horses have waded and dragged the Carriage through Snow...
I am very happy that you have favored me with a letter respecting Mr Smith. It increases the interest that I before took in his situation. I will not permit myself to believe that any recollections are cherished to his disadvantage, on account of that portion of his conduct as a youth to which you have alluded. It would not be simply unkind, but unjust. It would be cruel. I took great pleasure...
It is two years this month, through the Blessing of Heaven, since I have been prevented by Sickness, from sitting at our Table & giving a portion to each of my family in due Season, which is a Favour, which I cannot feel too grateful for—But for this fortnight past I have with Others in the Neighbourhood, been afflicted with what is called the Disorder of the Season—There has been but few...
I will not, I dare not, stop to think how long it is, since I have written to my Dear Sister, but hope she has been favoured with as good a state of health, through this winter, as she enjoyed in the course of the former part of the year, & that each dear & valuable branch of her household, have had a large share of a blessing, which those who are deprived of health, especially, know to be...
I have received your letter favour of the 20th Instant enclosing Mr Clarks letter and your reply—My Daughter has been with you from her Infantcy—you made me exacted a promise that I would never take her from you while you lived—I have however painful the relinquishment—adheared to my promis—you are now going to resign her to the protection of a stranger—If your heart sanctions the...
The contents of this letter I hope will be an apology for my intruding on You once more upon a disagreeable subject, that I hoped not to have occasion ever to mention to You again. I am very sorry to find a paragraph in my last letter had given You any Uneasiness. indeed my dear Madam it was not intended it proceeded from pity for the sister of a Man who I am sure must suffer much from the...
To offer you anything like consolation for your irreparable loss my dear Mother is I feel utterly impossible and Heaven alone can pour balm into the wound which in its wise decrees it has ordained. Too recently have I suffer’d the same dreadful stroke not to feel how every fibre of your heart must have been rent by this great great affliction if the tenderest sympathy could in the smallest...
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
I have intended every day since my arrival here to write you a line and inform you of my having safely reached it; but have hitherto been prevented, partly by business, and partly by the waste of time in visits, dinners and other avocations of the like nature: I say partly by business, for I have found much more of that to do here than I was aware of: upon undertaking to settle my accounts...
Mr. Adams brought me your very kind Letter from Town the day before yesterday dated in Septbr: and was very happy to find that you enjoyed your health so well throughout the Season which is generally so trying to you and I hope that you will pass the fast approaching Winter equally well. you must be careful of yourself and not expose yourself by taking the whole charge of the family as you are...
The Russian People pass their lives in a continual and alternate succession of feasting and fasting. Every individual whether of high or low degree celebrates two days in every year; one for his birth and the other for his baptism, which is called his name day, and is kept on the day marked in the Calendar, as devoted to the Saint of the same name; for it is a religious principle that every...
I have just returned from spending an agreeable hour with your best Friend. In the Course of our Conversation, he informed me that you had lately in Addition to former complaints, been afflicted with an intermitting fever of a testian type. This state of fever in our Climate of late years is Often accompanied with inflammatory Symptoms, and instead of yielding to its usual remedy the Bark is...
I have delayed writing dear Madam longer than I intended, in the hope of giving you a more favorable account of Mr. Adams’s health, which has been extremely indifferent ever since his arrival. I was much surprized and grieved to see him look so ill when he return’d I thank God he is now better though I am apprehensive while he continues in public life there is little chance of his enjoying...
I wrote to You the 14th. Inst. acknowledging the Receipt of Yours of Feby. 21. & the 6th. of this month. I have conferred with Mr. Porter and his Wife relative to their Continuance on the Farm for 7 Months—I cannot bring mr. Porter to a less Sum than 175 Dollrs for that Term, which is 25 Dollars more than you mentiond, altho it appears to me that it would upon the whole be better to give that...
Your two letters of November I have received, and am rejoiced to find that you recover strength. I have suffered a great deal of anxiety of mind upon account of your indisposition. At times I feel as if I could fly almost to see you, and be with you. When I lose you, this world will appear to me a desert. I do not complain, but my mind has suffered much; perhaps I am too prone to anticipate...
I have a day or two since received your favour of 10. Feby; by which I perceive that my last Letters from London had reached you, though I know not what was the fate of several that preceded them, and none of those which I wrote from this place had come to hand. I have not however since my arrival here been altogether negligent, and I hope that before this time you have received the proofs of...