Begin a
search

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Results 2201-2250 of 183,496 sorted by recipient
The very sudden change of the weather last Sabbath, when I was in a high state of persperation; caused so great opression & hoarseness upon my Lungs, as made me feel quite sick, & detained me in Town a day longer than I intended—As I had not sent to Mr Peabody, I thought best to send to Mr Parker, & go on Bag, & baggage, to our own Door in Atkinson by Wednesday Stage, which was much more...
Just after the date of my last Letter (7. May) I received orders form the Secretary of State, in consequence of which I proceeded as speedily as possible to this City—A Commission and Credential Letter to this Court had been sent here, where I was directed to come and find them. We came from Havre De Grace to Dover, where we landed on the 24th. of May, and came up the next day to London—Upon...
I received yours of the 29 Dec. yesterday morning. By the same mail we received the accounts of the defeat of Buonaparte, which made every good man very happy. Peter says in his paper of yesterday, that he “was just thinking! of something to present to the caitiffs of French Faction for a new years gift—something to shake their gall bladders, something to sting their souls, when he heard of...
The Time since I have written to you, I acknowledge is too long for One, whose Heart is deeply interested for all her dear Relatives, whose Memory loves to dwell, & delights to linger , where walk the smiling Virtues, in their most dignified, attractive, & lovely Form.—For several weeks past, I have been examining myself, to know from what Cause I kept Silence.—Though many Pleas were brought...
Yours and the Presidents Company on the thirtieth to dine, will add Much to the pleasure of that day, in which Brattle Street Society will be again blessed with a Minister approved of without a dissenting Voice . As you once were Members there, I thought it would be pleasing to You—if So, I hope your State of health will be Such as to admit of Your gratifying us. The Solemn Ceremony commences...
I last week receiv’d your kind Letter of the 10th of this month. I have certainly lost one. It must have been in the lost mail, but how was it lost? I never heard of it till you mention’d it. yes my sister I have been & still am greatly affected by your afflictions—Heaven may in great kindness have taken your child from a seducing world, when temtation become too strong for virtue surely tis...
I went yesterday & return’d Mr. E’s sermons to Mr. Lyman’s to Mr E was there, & gave him the thanks which the President sent—I promis’d to pass the day with Miss L. & came home to say so—Your kind letter was then handed me—Susan came here & wrote you I too wrote a few lines which were seal’d in her’s to go yesterday but the stage-man had gone when they were sent—Mr. G. has just call’d & taken...
Your ready reply my dear madam to my last forbids a delay on my part to Cherish a Correspondence that has Given reciprocal pleasure. when I See the Glow of friendship still kept alive in the bosom of the few left of my former associates, it is a powerful Stimulous to take up the pen. it is to me indeed a pleasing occupation, when this Can be done unincumbered with ceremony.—when the mind feels...
I have myself, my dear Friend, been very unwell since I received your short but consolatory letter dated Feby. 21st. which inform’d me of your recovery from a languid state of health. You observ’d then it was only partial, I hope now it is complete.— Inform me also when you write again, of the health of Mr. Adams.— I regret much for him the privation of sight— it is a rich blessing at all...
I send you another paper with the second proclamation of Genera l Smyth, with observations on it—these proclamations produce a very great sensation thro’ the whole of this state—the allusion Scored in the paper came thus scored from Albany—I suppose by the Editor—But if the people at the election succeed in their votes for W:S.S. I think he had better go to Washington than to an ill arranged...
Although I have it not in my power to make this Letter in any manner interesting—yet I am So fullÿ confident of your good opinion, and your willingness to oblige me, that you will permit me, in acquitting me of a duty, by assuring you of my grateful Sense of your favour. This acknowledgment you might not doubt—but it is a pleasure to indulge it. It was however a higher gratification—as it was...
I have heard with pain of the Presidents indisposition and lament that I am not near enough to him to offer him my Advice. The disease under which he labours, at the present season, & in persons of his time of life, is generally accompanied with such Symptoms of fulness, inflammatory Action, or Oppression, as to require bleeding, and Other depleting remedis before the Bark can be given with...
I ought to have written ere this to you, my valluable Friend, to have expressed the heart felt gratification I have derived from reading your sympathetic letters. They have proved a balm to my wounded bosom. But many calls & duties devoled up-on me of late unknown before, & I have hetherto written only on business. Your claims are first on the list of friendship, yes my Friend every tribute...
Has not this long term of rainy weather made you sick? it has almost every body arround us—& I sensibly feel it effects—Poor Norton had a very billious turn, which confined him to his bed a week, & to the House a fortnight—But means have been mercifully blessed for his recovery, though he looks very feeble, & thin of flesh, & more like his Mother than ever—Abby, was taken in the same manner a...
I have your favor of the 23d: inst. before me. The Country looks so pleasant and inviting in the vicinity of this City, that I have no difficulty in conceiving the beauties of Quincy farm, at this moment. I have lately passed some days, at different intervals, in the Country, and found much benefit from the change of air. As to the accident, which befel me, I should scarcely have thought it...
Blessed are the Peace-makers!—In that glorious band of righteous do I class my friend Mrs. Adams. Your long silence, my dear Madam, has not been mis-construed.—I concluded you was waiting for the arrangement you proposed, when I received your very agreeable visit.—I think I did not mis-apprehend the message you then delivered from Mr. Adams, which you promised with his love to me, with a...
Your Favours of May the 28h. & June the 6th. came safe to Hand in the Latter 200 Dr. and a Minute of the Sums transmitted to me, which I find to agree with the Credits I have given, it gives me Satisfaction, that in all the Transactions of Business for Quincy’s Estate as well as the Management of Yours I do not recollect an Instance wherein I have faild of giving Credit for Monies received tho...
Mr Gallatin and Mr Bayard have been here a complete Month. They had arrived at Reval, a Port just at the entrance of the Gulph of Finland, about 250 miles from this place, at the date of my last Letter—The next day I was informed of their arrival; and the day following they reached this City—They are accompanied by a Son of Mr Dallas of Philadelphia, Mr: Milligan of Delaware, Mr. Todd, Mrs:...
I was honored with your note, & have attended to it as I hope is in accordance to your will on the subject. I have suffered several times by such mistakes as are noticed in my printed reply; & the opportunity to vindicate myself was so happily presented that justice seemed to require that I should not pass it over. I disavow all connection with the party business of the past or present—&...
I presume, it is not abusing your kindness, in addressing you with a few lines, to assure you of mÿ Sincerest thanks for the unexpected gift of Quincÿ Adam’s Lectures—which you have bestowed on me. What enhances the value of this present, is that Seems to have been a mark of filial affection of a beloved Son, now endorsed to me bÿ your own hand. It is mÿ misfortune—Madam! that I can onlÿ...
Rejoice with me, that I have this Day finished my Ceremonies with the two Houses. Their Answers to the Speech have been civil and I have given them civil Replies. My St. Anthonys fire attacked me again after I had been here a few days—But it has given me no Pain and is better—almost gone off. It must be the Air or Water of this place that gives it me. The H. of R. will dispute about the Alien...
By the last Letters I have received from my wife I expect she will reach Boston by the last of this week, or the beginning of the next—The House in which Mr: Ware lives will not be vacant untill after Commencement, and Mr: Pearson, proposing to sell his declines letting it—He is indeed in Treaty now, for the sale of it. I have therefore concluded to go into my House at Quincy again for the...
With a great deal of snow upon the Ground it is now plentifully snowing. There must be an unusual Quantity upon the Earth. I suppose you have it very deep. Our Men and Teams must have had a terrible Jobb to get the Lumber home: but I hope it is all compleated e’er this. To Day at two Dr. Ewing & Mr. Snowden are to dine with me and tomorrow at four about 30 Senators and Reps...I have not had as...
The receipt of all your Letters to that of 30. June has been acknowledged. To answer them, I must have time to think—a privilege which I so seldom enjoy that I cannot even anticipate when I may be indulged with it—Mr Tuckerman brought your last Letter—I saw him and his Lady once. But they were only three or four days in London, and are gone upon a tour into the Country. Mr Tuckerman says his...
Your kind letter dated this day week, has just come to hand. I rejoice to hear of your arrival once more at the farm house & that you have so far recovered from the unlucky accident, which befel you, as to be able to walk about. The return of my father was announced in the newspapers & with the addition of a line, signifying that “his worth would make him welcome there.” It is a source of...
In conversation with the President, as he passed to the seat of Government, I mentioned to him my fears respecting the continuation of the new levies raised during the subsisting difference with France, And my desire, that my son Charles Hunt a Leut: in the 14 Regimt. should be transposed to one of the former, or first raised Regiments to ensure his continuance in the Army, which appears to be...
The unexpected and exquisite gratification I received from the polite Letter, with which you honoured me, convinced me more than ever of the truth, that in pleasure, as well as in the pain it is often difficult to ascertain the point, at which it can not bear a farther increase. I am entirelÿ at a loss, Madam! how to address you with empty hands, more So, as you Shower Such–a–profusion of...
I acknowledge with Pleasure your Letter of the 7th Inst: thinking it uncertain whether you may not have left Philadelphia before this reaches that City I shall desire The President to open it provided you should have entered on your Journey northward unaccompanied by him I am induced to do this least the Appointments should be made out before I could make known my Wishes to him. They are to...
After many expecting, anxious hours for my dear Nephew, I am made happy by seeing his safe arrival announced in the Newspaper—The fibres of my heart cannot remain untouched, while my Sisters must be filled with joy, & gratitude— I claim a share, & feel that I am a maternal Participant—I know that you long to clasp your Son in your fond arms—When he reaches Peace-field you will think the order...
To Correct an error has been Considerd as proof of a Candid Mind—Will you then permit me my much respected friend to express to you,— And by thus doing obtain your forgiveness ,—if I have in the least wounded your feelings by any expressions derogatory to that respect & esteem at all times due to one so much my Superior, and to whom I Consider myself under great Obligations.—I know the...
We embarked at Providence on Tuesday morning, as I wrote you we purposed to do; and after a tolerably pleasant passage of three days and Nights arrived here the day before yesterday about noon; much to the satisfaction of my Sister and her children, who have thus reached the end of their Journey. But we for our part have accomplished not more than one half of ours; and we have taken Seats in...
Altho’ I did not Accept of your kind invitation for yesterday, it was then my intention to have been with you to day but alas we know not what a day will bring forth My good Brother is unexpectedly remov’d from Office and it has thrown us all into such Consternation that with my present feelings I could not partake of that pleasure—which I have ever receivd & had anticipated the ensuing...
The roads have been so bad & the weather such that I had almost despaired of ever hearing again from Quincy—I am very happy to hear that you and the President are well again—I left last week a letter & a number of papers at Connors for Mrs Black to take to Quincy. I hope you have received them. I send by Richard to days & yesterdays papers, with a number of papers & a letter from Wheaton,...
I find in your letter of 5. Jany: last that you make mention of others which you had written in Septr: Octr: and Novr: preceding—Of those, when the original of the enclosed was written, I had received only the last—that of 17 Novr:—But on the twelfth of this Month I received your’s of September 24. 1811—and last Monday that of 17. Feby: 1812—N:2. Your letter of October is yet to come; unless...
I trust this letter will find you not in a sick chamber where your kind favor of the 10th instant was written, but out again, restored to your usual health, witnessing the return of spring and awake to its enjoyments. The kind expressions of your letter are not more flattering than endearing. Those little children of whom you so kindly inquire, will, I doubt not, at one day look over it with...
Your favour of 26. November, is yet the latest that I have received from you—But since my last to you, and since mine of the 3d. instant to my father, I have received one from him, more earnestly calling upon me, to ask my recall from this Mission, and return home—I have in my last Letters both to him and you, expressed my sentiments and intentions on this subject, and have alledged such...
I have now to acknowledge the receipt of your number 6. dated 22. February, brought by the Henry Captain Harris; a vessel of which we had heard nearly a Month since, and which has at length arrived after a passage from Boston of 100 days.—The arrivals from America now crowd upon one another in multitudes which I am afraid will prove not very profitable to many of the adventurers.—From Quincy...
Your last kind Letters of the 20 of May reached London only two days since and according to your request I hasten to answer it—I wrote you some time since that I had performed my journey in safety and passed two delightful Months in Paris which I quitted with the greatest regret since which the fate of that unfortunate Country has been decided and it is doomed to return to that state of...
I have received your kind letter dated Feby. 11th. and feel the warmest gratitude for your tender sympathy with me in my affliction. I am sure there is nothing so consoling to a heart wounded by grief, as the thought that others sympathize with us in our sorrows. You, my dear Aunt, knew my mother, and you knew how dearly and how deservedly she was loved by her family, her connexions and all...
We arrived on the 10th. I, much oppressed by one of my great Colds, which is now going off.—I could obtain only one little Room and one little bedroom but We can make a shift. I came here more loaded with Sorrow than with Rheum. Sally opened her Mind to me for the first time. I pitied her, I grieved, I mourned but could do no more. a Madman possessed of the Devil can alone express or...
You never received a Letter from Berlin but with Pleasure: and this I dare say will not be the first. From Austins in a lowry Morning We proceeded to Hartford and dined at Bulls. A polite Invitation from the County Court to dine with them was declined, and We came on immediately to Squire Rileys. The Coachman thought it would be too hard upon the Horses to go to Wallingford. I have now read...
Since I wrote you last, 1. February I have had no opportunity of putting a Letter even on its way, to reach you, when it should please Heaven. The ordinary intercourse between this Country and England by the way of Gothenburg has been suspended from the 24th: of December untill this day, by the freezing of the Harbours, and there are now 22 Mails due, from London—The same Cause has prevented...
If you can send in the Carriage, on Saturday, my wife and Caroline will go out to Quincy with me, and stay there untill Tuesday Morning—They intend to go to Plymouth with me—And the stage will take us up at Quincy Tuesday morning, on the way—I shall pay due respect to your sage counsels about dress—Though I hope you do not mean to insist that I should ride in the Stage, in breeches and silk...
Your favour of 21. June, without a number, was forwarded to me from Copenhagen by Mr. Erving, who recovered it from the Radius, which on her passage to this place, was taken by a french privateer, and is still detained in Denmark—Like almost all the letters which we have received this year it brought tidings of sickness and affliction among our friends—In the sorrow which they have so often...
I have the happiness to inform my invaluable friend mrs. Adams of the safe arrival of her precious little ward The had a long passage of 12 days but the Nurse nor Children were not sick and Naby was only one day very sick. The babe did not appear fatigued with the voyage but is very much tanned which I think must conceal some of her beauty. She is very lively and is grown very fond to have me...
From Lovejoys at Stratford We put off Mr. Shaw with a part of the Baggage by the Stage for East Chester. Mrs Smith and the fair Caroline came with me to Norwalk to dinner at Gregories, where We were very comfortable. We rode in gentle snow & rain all day and Arrived at Webbs at Night, where We put up till Monday. My Horses want a day of rest. From Quincy to Stanford, within 22 miles of East...
Your letters, dear Madam, are always welcome, and your requests are commands to me. I only regret that I can do so little towards obeying them. but eight and twenty years since I left France would, in the ordinary course of mortality, have swept off seven eighths of my acquaintances, and when to this lapse of time are added the knife of the Guillotine & scythe of constant and sanguinary wars,...
As another Year is closing upon time, and joining “the years beyond the flood,” I cannot employ its last moments more satisfactorily to myself, or more consistently with the duties at all times incumbent upon me, than in renewing to my dear and honoured Parents the testimonies of my gratitude, duty and affection—In repeating the assurance of my ardent desire to return to them, to my long...
I am now come home for the holidays and I hope to receive a great many letters but too I must mind to write to you as many times as you do to me There has been a latin play acted at Ealing called the Andrian one of Terences it was acted three times this year that is to say three times running as to the Actors I can not tell, I suppose you will soon hear Who they are; all I know is that George...
The President yesterday received a letter from Mr Adams, in which he mentions his acceptance of his late appointment, and that he expected to embark in the course of the present month. The letter is dated on the 19th of April. In the possible event of this information not having reached you by the same vessel, I hasten to communicate it, offering my renewed congratulations to yourself and Mr...