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Results 1891-1920 of 183,158 sorted by recipient
I find, from a conversation with Mr Monroe, that it is not the intention of government to send dispatches to Spain by the Chippewa, or to employ her, in any other way, as a dispatch vessel. Hence the rumour adverted to in your favor of the 28th ulto. must, it would seem, have originated in some mistake. I ought to have transmitted this information some days earlier, and beg leave to apologize...
The receipt of your favour of 2. December was acknowledged in my last, dated the 9th. of January—Three days afterwards, I received your Letter of 9. and 18. November which had been brought by Mr Tarbel—But it was forwarded, I believe from Manchester, Mr and Mrs Tarbel not having yet arrived in London. We have received no Letters of a later date from Quincy. Our Sons, after a Vacation of seven...
Last week I sent you with a Letter from my wife the Newspaper containing the Account of the Lord Mayor’s day feast at Guildhall, where you will find again some mention made of the American Minister—The singularity of the feast did not however consist in his being there; but in the Circumstance that no other Minister, either home-bred or foreign was present; and in the phenomenon still more...
The religious ceremony of which in my last Letter I gave you an account, began at Midnight and terminated between three and four in the morning.—It was accompanied by a Salute of 21. Guns fired from the Fortress, two or three times, at particular stages of the performance—This was conformable to the customary practice; which always ushers in Easter day at St: Petersburg with an expence of...
It is a sad misfortune to dear Connections when their Friends do not love to write—Some I know have not time, & some have not ability, & some foolishly averse—I have not heard from Mr Fosters family, since Abby’s return from Boston.—I wish I knew how my Son likes his new Boarding place—&c—I hope he has not been confined by Rhumatism this winter—& am very sorry Mrs Smith inherits the infirmity...
Will you permit me at this late period to come before you with my congratulations on the return of your Son and his family to their native country, I have wish’d to do it ever since I heard of their arrival. I am almost ashamed to say, and yet it is the real reason Why I did not, that I feel such a diffidence in writing to you that I cannot conquer, and which induces me forego what I esteem...
Your very interesting Letter of last week in which you mention the departure of your dear Caroline, with so much affectionate regret, is a pleasing evidence of her intrinsick worth.—I hope she has comfortably reached her Home, & is seated by her worthy Partner in their own Mansion, kindly welcomed to the arms of a fond Mother, where she may safely repose without fear of molestation, or dread...
I grieve to be under the necessity of informing you that I am again to be disappointed of passing next Monday with you at Quincy as the expence of a Carriage is double on account of the celebration of Independance . I shall certainly keep this Anniversary in the full conviction that we are too much the creatures of circumstances to enjoy much of th is e boasted blessing or I should not at this...
I thank you for your kind letter of the 4th: instt, which came to hand last evening, accompanied by one from Dr: Tufts, enclosed by William. My letters are left usually at Mr: Wistar’s and Sarah when she gave me those of last evening, say’s “Thomas, I expect I have got a rich treat for thee; from the number of packets addressed to thee, I should judge thee a favorite among thy friends” I...
I received some days since your kind letter of the 11th: of last month, and was delighted to find you had so far recovered as to be able to write—Since then I have been informed by my brother and Mr: Shaw, that your health continued improving and I sincerely pray to the great disposer of Events that it may be entirely restored and long continued, for your own comfort and the happiness of us...
On the 10th: of August 1811. we received your favour of 22. September 1810 to my wife; not quite eleven months after it was written; and the next day we received that of 8 June 1811. which has performed its voyage in a little more than two. Whether the Passage has been short or long the letter always gives pleasure, and always contains some intelligence that is new. You have repeatedly...
The solicitude you express’d to have your little Susan learn dancing has induced me to make some inquiries, and has consequently led me to reflect more on the subject than I ever before had done; the result of those inquiries, and these reflections is, a decided opinion against introducing either music or dancing (as an Art) into this little seminary. My daughter will give you my reasons,...
I have not written you so often as I wish’d to do for these several weeks. I have not been free from company since ordination: our house has been like a Tavern. Last week I receiv’d your kind present by General Lincoln for which I most Sincerely thank you. tis very pretty, & very delicate muslin—mrs Smith sent me the little Gown for a pattern to make it by. I like the Form all but the apron &...
The Opportunities for writing to you are now so frequent, that it is impossible, to avail ourselves of them all—They are indeed principally from Liverpool, through which place, I have for the last two Months and upwards sent Letters or despatches almost every week—There are however occasionally Vessels going from the Port of London, and by one of them I now write—I have determined to forward...
I enclose a letter from my brother, received a day or two ago—You will be gratified by the perusal of its contents. In Wayne’s paper of last night, herewith enclosed, you will find a letter from Mr: Thomas Pinckney on the subject of the letter published in the Aurora, by Tench Coxe, signed John Adams: Mr: P—— is not intemperate in his remarks, but he promises to investigate. If he intend s...
I had the happiness of receiving your excellent letter at Middleton, for which my heart is alive to gratitude. My dear Connexions were thankful for your kind rememberance of them. We returned home last week, & expect to set out for Portsmouth next Mony, when we hope to have the satisfaction of passing some social hours at Your Mansion. Excuse the brevity of this my Dear Friend, as many cares...
I received a few days ago your kind letter of 29 January. After having been so many months without a line from you, it gave me sincere pleasure to see your hand-writing again, though I could not but sympathise with the afflictions under the immediate burden of which it was written—I have cordially and deeply lamented my poor brother, and will obey your injunction respecting his child. I learn...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
This morning I had the satisfaction of receiving your kind letter of the 21st: ulto: which partly relieved me from the anxiety occasioned by the letter of a previous date from my brother, mentioning your illness and confinement—The weather has of late been so remarkably fine and mild in this quarter that I hope its benign influence has been extended to your regions, and has restored you...
O how happy should I be, were I to sit down to write you of my dear sisters better health, but alas I cannot. She fails every day & has now grown so weak that she is not able to writte out or even to come below stairs. She still keeps her usual flow of spirits, & she sits “like patience on a monument, smiling” even tho in the arms of death. How miserable should I be, my aunt, in seeing my dear...
I am sorry that we are again obliged to postpone our visit to you at Quincy, as George is this day breaking out with the meazles—His symptoms however are favourable, and we hope he will have the disorder lightly—I send out by William the two turkies and a fish. There is no Cod at market, for which reason I send a haddock—You will also receive a Rochefort cheese enclosed in a leaden cover—Of...
I live in that retired manner that affords much time for reflection, which must be my apology for addressing you at this time, as memory has been so kind as to present you very frequently of late as one that has ever taken an interesd in my welfare. And I can say that Friendship has indeed been the Wine of life to me. I feel that you are not indefferent to the happiness of me and my dear...
Your letter of 22d Ulto: so marked with sensibility—so tender in expression, towards the offspring of the lovely friend, whose loss you so deeply deplore, excites the deep & ardent gratitude of myself—my brother & my wife.—the late call she had opportunity to make was delightfully satisfactory to her feelings & be will reiterated by me the first moment that can present itself.— Your assurances...
I have a thousand things to tell you and but a few minutes to write. We arrived in this city Fryday Evening about seven O clock—the first week we had most beautiful weather & found the roads most excellent—the President said he never knew them to be so good but the snow made them as bad as they were before good. We had not been in the house but a few minutes before his Excellency the Govenor...
I received yesterday your kind letter of 17th. instant, informing me of the death of my dear and venerable father, and of the hopeless state of health of my dear Mother. I rejoice and am thankful that my father was not left to linger out a painful and solitary existence deprived of the dear partner of all his comforts. which It seems like a special interposition of the all–merciful hand. My...
Your ready reply my dear Madam to my last forbids a delay on my part to cherish a correspondence that has given reciprocal pleasure. When I see the glow of friendship kept alive in the bosom of the few left of my former associates it is a powerful stimulus to take up the pen. It is to me indeed a pleasing occupation when this can be done unincumbered by ceremony. When the mind feels itself at...
Mr Tarbell informs me that he and his Lady have determined to return to the United States, and that they expect to sail next Monday for from Liverpool. I have now barely time to tell you that we are all well, and to send you a Newspaper, and the last number of the Quarterly Review—We have received Letters from my father and brother, and from you, to the 27th. of May—If the intervals between my...
I did not my dear Mrs. Adams, write by yr Son when last in Plymouth, because I wished to retain the very valuable Letters of the American Minister at Petersburg, a little longer in my hand.—I wish’d my Son Winslow and his father to peruse them, which from sickness and other causes they could not do immediately.—I have not communicated them to any eye but those of my Son’s, though I think them...
Your kind favor of the 14th of this month, was very gratifying to me. Nothing can be more interesting then the account which it gives of the Presidents visit to Boston and the vicinity. The letter from Mr Adams which you were so good as to enclose, I have to apologize for not returning sooner. I desire to thank you for the opportunity afforded me of perusing it. There is an impressive wisdom...
After I had closed my last Letter to you dated 1st. October, I received on the same day your favour of the 30th. August, and some day’s afterwards the collection of Pamphlets on the late Trinitarian controversy, they were brought as far as Liverpool by Mr. Cary, who survived the Passage across the Atlantic, but who was not destined to reach London alive. he died at Royston on the road from...