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Results 211-240 of 183,203 sorted by author
Notwithstanding my confinement I think I have not omitted writing you by every post. I have recoverd Health and strength beyond expectation; and never was so well in so short a time before. Could I see my Friend in reality as I often do in immagination I think I should feel a happiness beyond expression; I had pleasd myself with the Idea of presenting him a fine son or daughter upon his...
I write you a few lines my dear Lucy to thank you for your kind Letter, and to inform you that I am a Grandmamma ! my Grandson be sure is a fine Boy, & I already feel as fond of him as if he was my own son, nay I can hardly persuade myself that he is not, especially as I have been sick for six weeks, I cannot however Nurse him so well as his mamma, who is already so fond of him, that I...
Your favour of April 6th reachd me to day per favour Mr. Williams, and is the only one I have had the pleasure of receiving since the arrival of the Marquiss. I wish you would be so particular in yours as to notice any you may receive from me, for to this day I am at a loss to know whether you have yet received a line. Mrs. D an a told me that Mr. D—a had mentiond hearing twice from her. I...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of Several Letters from You Since Your arrival in London, the first Nov br 24 th Jan ry 6 th Feb ry 23, and Yesterday I received Yours of March 20th, for all of which, accept my Thanks, and believe that they are to me a most Valuable Deposit. The desire You express, that no warmer encomium may be bestowed upon You; than a bare approbation, may restrain my pen,...
I must write you a few lines by this opportunity, altho tis a long time since I had the pleasure of hearing from you by your own Hands. You used to be fond of writing and have been very good since your absence. Letters are always valuable from those we Love, if they con­ tain nothing but an account of their Health. I cannot but reflect with thankfullness to the Great Preserver of my dear...
I return you, with thank’s the Letter You was so good as to communicate, and the Specimin’s of Poetry, which do great honour to the memory of the unfortunate youth; who is the subject of them. at the same time they bear a pleasing testimony to the Talants and abilities of the Authoressess. The Eligy of the Lady of Seventy, I think bears away the palm. I have a Mischievious inclination to...
I hope you have had no occasion either from Enemies or the Dangers of the Sea to repent your second voyage to France. If I had thought your reluctance arose from proper deliberation, or that you was capable of judgeing what was most for your own benifit, I should not have urged you to have accompanied your Father and Brother when you appeared so averse to the voyage. You however readily...
I last Evening received Yours of March the 15 and 17th together with the Money you remitted. it was very fortunate in its arrival, for in half an hour after, I had two fine cows offerd me which I immediatly purchasd tho I gave 40 dollors for them. The sheep Lambd so early, and my cows came in so early that we have expended more english Hay than I could wish, and they Rob’d my Horses to feed...
This is Election Day, but the news of the day I am not able to inform you of as I have Heard nothing from Town. The House is not so unwealdy a Body this year as the last. Very few Towns have sent more than one, and those are many of them new Members. Whether they have changd for the better time will discover. I recollect a remark of a writer upon Goverment, who says that a single assembly is...
I am determined not to neglect my pen for so long an interval as I did before your last Letters; for then I always go to it with reluctance. Mr. Appleton came here this Day week; from London, and as he thinks he shall return before Captain Young sails, I am induced to proceed to the fulfilment of my promise, and attempt a Description of the French Theater. I have from time, to time, survey’d...
We Reachd this place last evening and put up at a mr Avery’s private Lodgings, where we are very well accommodated. I am delighted with the veiw I have had of this state, the River is in full sight from the House & the fields yet retain their verdure, Lands I am told are valued here at a hundred pounds pr acre, and it is not unusuall to let the Farms upon this River at four pounds pr Annum pr...
I fear to look back to the Date of my last Letter to You, least it should accuse me of omission. There have been but very few opportunities this Severe Winter, of writing to You Rude Boreas laid an embargo, and our harbours have been frozen for six weeks, so that not a vessel could go out, or come in. for about a Week we have had a Thaw. I have received within a fortnight your Letters of...
I arrived here this day week, but have been so constantly occupied in seeing company that I have not had time to write a single Line. I received your Letter which I suppose had been on to Philadelphia, on fryday last, in the full Faith that mr Peabody & you would comply with our request. I took the Children, and brought them with me. John is somewhat indisposed with a return of his Ague— I...
It is a very pleasent morning Sir, and I have risen a little after five, that I might have the pleasure of writing you before Captain Bigolew Sails, so Sir I have seated myself at a desk near the window of the Chamber in which you used to lodge, from whence you know the square has a beautifull appearence, delightfully green it is, but the weather continues so cold that we still keep fires. As...
If I was certain I should welcome you to your native Land in the course of the summer, I should not regret Mr. Smiths going abroad without me. Should it be otherways, should you still be detained abroad—I must submit, satisfied that you judge best, and that you would not subject me to so heavy a dissapointment, or yourself to so severe a mortification as I flatter myself it would be, but for...
Why my good Man, thou hast the curiosity of a Girl. Who could have believed that only a slight hint would have set thy imagination a gig in such a manner. And a fine encouragement I have to unravel the Mistery as thou callest it. Nothing less truly than to be told Something to my disadvantage. What an excellent reward that will be? In what Court of justice did’st thou learn that equity? I...
Captain Beal who is always attentive to the post office for me in your absence, brought Me on the Evening of the Seventh your Letter written at Stratford Nov br 27 th , which is the only line which has yet reachd me; I fear you sufferd from the cold on the journey, for it has been unusually so, for the Season. the continuence of it, has frozen the Ground very deep. I fear we shall not be able...
I have been prevented writing you for more than a Week past by a Whitlow upon the fore finger of my right Hand. Tis now so tender that I can manage a pen but poorly. I hope you have received several Letters from me in this fortnight past. I wrote by Mr. Linch Lynch , and by Dr. Frankling the latter of whom I had the pleasure of dining with, and of admiring him whose character from my Infancy I...
Tis ten days I believe since I wrote you a Line, yet not ten minuts passes without thinking of you. Tis four Months wanting 3 days since we parted, every day of the time I have mournd the absence of my Friend, and felt a vacancy in my Heart which nothing, nothing can supply. In vain the Spring Blooms or the Birds sing, their Musick has not its formour melody, nor the Spring its usual...
Mrs Smith appeard so anxious and unhappy tho She Said nothing, that seeing it, I advised her to follow you, & sent Michial to Town hoping she would overtake you tomorrow. she appeard so rejoiced at the proposal, that in half an hour, she was gone. I hope She will overtake you by tomorrow night. I slept well last night & tho I feel very low spirited, I shall strive to be [co]ntent. I will...
Not since the 5th of Sepbr. have I had one line from you which makes me very uneasy. Are you all this time confering with his Lordship, is there no communication? or are the post Riders all dismissd. Let the cause be which it will, not hearing from you has given me much uneasiness. We seem to be kept in a total Ignorance of affairs at York. I hope you at Congress are more inlightned. Who fell,...
I have not had the pleasure of receiving a Line from you for some time. I laughd at my Friend not long since when he sent a Letter to you the contents of which he appeard to be very private about. I told him I knew it was the Farm he had written about, and that he would not tell me because he knew I was averse to encumbering ourselves as we grew older with more cares. it is not my wish to add...
I received Your kind Letter of Sep br 5 and was very happy to learn from it, that You enjoyed So large a portion of Health. long may the blessing be continued to You and to Your Family. My own Health has been very infirm through the Summer, nor does it Seem much mended by the appraching fall. I thank you my Dear Madam for your kind wishes. The Event You notice expected Event You mention in...
I hope long before this time you have arrived Safe at Berlin. The first intelligence which I received of your having left England, was under the Copenhagen head soon after. Letters were received from mr Murrey of the 9 th of November, in which he mentions your writing to him from Hamburgh. I immediatly informed my dear Louissa’s Parents and received a Letter from mrs jhonson this last week; in...
I wrote you some days ago, and mr Gardner comeing in just as I had closed my Letter I inquired of him, if he knew of any opportunity of sending to Boston, he replied, that a vessel belonging to Newyork had taken freight for Boston and would Sail that day. I gave him the Letter to you, the only one I had written which he promised to put into the bag; and which I hope has reachd you. I expected...
I set myself down to write with a Heart depressed with the Melancholy Scenes arround me. My Letter will be only a Bill of Mortality, tho thanks be to that Being who restraineth the pestilence, that it has not yet proved mortal to any of our family, tho we live in daily Expectation that Patty will not continue many hours. A general putrefaction seems to have taken place, and we can not bear the...
Your favour of july 20th repeated to me the melancholy tidings of my dear Aunts Death. The first information which we received of it, was by a Letter from Mr W. Smith by way of Liverpool in a very short passage, upon the receipt of which I immediately wrote you. No person my dear sir can more sincerely sympathize with you than your afflicted Neice, the kindness with which my dear Aunt always...
Your favour of the 5th instant is just come to hand. I should like very well to see the Speach you mention and the reply, but would not desire it till you have full Licence to communicate it.—I wish I could give you such intelligence from Rhode Island as I hoped to, but not withstanding we have men of Sence and Letters, many of them there, we do not get Authentick intelligence. Tis a week...
I received yours of the 12 th. I wish congress may rise by the time you mention. a Gentleman reported here yesterday that he had heard that mr Langdon had said he was determind to oppose the Treaty in every article. people are very anxious— the col had letters from Halifax which informs him, that without Libeling the vessel, they proceed to unload her & will not permit the Captain nor a single...
Your Letter by way of Bilboa dated February 25, did not reach me until the 2d. of this Month, yet it was 2 Months later date than any I have received from my Friends, and I feel myself much obliged to you for your information. We had heard by way of New York of the resignation of your Governour, and we have had many conjectures, who amongst all the Canditates will succeed him. We rather thing...