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Results 4551-4600 of 183,496 sorted by author
The plan of operation in the naval service projected in your second favor of the third of June I like very well.—We must open the intercourse with St Domingo on the best terms we can provided the accounts from Steevens and Maitland will admit of it. I will not dissappoint those islandlers if I can help it. My greatest fears are that Maitland & Toussaint will not agree. The Constitution will...
You are uneasy that I dont write enough. I understand you. You want me to unravel to you all the Mysteries of the Poli ti cks of Europe, and all the Intrigues of Courts. This would make Madam a Lady of Consequence no doubt and enable her to shine in a Circle of Politicians of Either sex.—But in the first Place I dont understand them—in the next if I did I would give the English Leave to laugh...
I Suffer So much Uneasiness, on Account of the State of Things here, that I cannot fail to communicate my Anxieties, so to some one in Congress, which you may We are very much Straightened for Funds, and you send Us no supplies, and yet you draw upon Us, from America from the West Indies, and from many other Quarters. We are continually exposed to the Insolen Reproaches, and the Insolence of...
I have this Morning, filed in order your Letters and have now in one bundle before me from N o. 6 to N o. 23 inclusively and will take care they shall not be again Seperated. The Western Posts are all delivered, and the Commissions in a good Way.— M r King and M r Gore in England and I hope M r Pinkney in France, will be your Friends bothe Personally and Politically. You are destined to...
I received but last night your favor of the 4th. The papers containing applications & recommendations for the collectorship of the port of Louisville in Kentucky I have read & agree with you that Mr James McConnel appears to be the person most suitable to receive the appointment to succeed Col. Richard Taylor resigned & you may send him a commission accordingly. I return all these papers &...
4556January 16. Sunday. (Adams Papers)
Reposed and wrote. Among other letters written this day JA addressed a very long one to Pres. Huntington devoted mainly to the geography, commerce, and governmental administration of the maritime provinces of Galicia and Biscay ( PCC , No. 84, I; copied from LbC , Adams Papers , into JA ’s Autobiography under its date ).
What apology can I offer, for the liberty I take of introducing to you the Revnd Henry Colman of Hingham? My apology is ready without ceremony. Mr Colman wishes to see, the great and good men and things in New York & Philadelphia, and as a man of Science, letters, and virtue, he is worthy to see them. Any notice you may take of him, will be gratefully acknowledged, by your humble Servant with...
Amsterdam, January 1st, 1781—wrote to Congress: “The mail from London arrived this morning, brought us for a new year’s entertainment, the following MANIFESTO. George R. Through the whole course of our reign, our conduct towards the States General of the United Provinces, has been that of a sincere friend and faithful ally. Had they adhered to those wise principles which used to govern the...
There is now an Harmony so entire between France America and Holland, that I think Affairs must come to a good Conclusion, if they do not it will I am perswaded be our Fault. But I am determined it shall not be mine, and I dont believe it will be Mr Jays. Spain is now inclined to make a Treaty with us, as I am informed, and the Comte d’Aranda is authorised to treat with him at Paris, this...
I received, this day with great Pleasure your Favour of the Twelfth and fourteenth Instant —and was the more gratified with it, because it was dated from Watertown, where I wish my excellent Friend very constantly to reside, for the good of the Public and where consequently I wish you to be, because his Happiness will be promoted by it. The Graces and the Muses, will always inhabit with such...
In your favour of Oct r. 29, you inform me that The Marquis has observed in Germany, that the Lies which are Spread to our disadvantage, must be injurious to our national honour, if We neglect to contradict them.— —When I came first to Europe, now approaching to Eight years ago, my Indignation was roused, at the Shame less Falshoods which were continually propagated, and I took a great deal of...
I have received this evening your favor of the 26 Nov. with the pamphlet inclosed. I have run it over in more haste, than it was written in, but am so far possessed of its purport, as to be better pleased that it was written in 20 hours, than if it had been the elaborate production of a week; because it shews the first impressions of the writer, upon reading the pamphlet it is an answer. This...
I am greatly obliged to you for your letter of the 9 th It has entirely convinced me that the Mecklengburg Resolutions are a fiction, when I first read them in the Essex Register, I was struct with astonishment—It appeared to me utterly incredible that they should be genuine; but there were so many circumstances calculated to impose the public; that I thought it my duty to take measures for...
As you was so well acquainted with the philosophers of France I presume the name and character of Mademoiselle De Lespinasse is not unknown to you. I have almost put out my eyes by reading two volumes of her letters which as they were printed in 1809 I presume you have read long ago. I confess I have never read any thing with more ennui, disgust and loathing. The eternal repitition of mon dieu...
The Revd. Mr Edward Everett, though in early youth is desirous of Seeing the oldest Patriot and Statesman in America; and to gratify him I give him a Letter to you. As I cannot Say enough of him, I have a great mind to Say nothing at all; but I will Say, he has given to the World proofs of Genius Learning and Industry, which might be compared to a Pascal at his Age. Mr Colman has a Letter,...
The Day before Yesterday, M r Bingham arrived and delivered me the Extracts, for which I am obliged to you, they coincide with many other Letters and much other Evidence. There is no Commission or Instruction, in Europe, to negotiate any Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain. There is only a general Instruction to “meet the Advances and encourage the Disposition of the Commercial Powers of...
The Alteration of Post Days or some other Cause has disappointed me of a Letter from you this Week, which is the first time I have failled of a Letter on Monday for several months. The Weather has been very hot and dry here. Yesterday however We had a Light shower: but to day it is very hot again. The House is slow upon the Ways and means the essential Measure which remains— But I think We...
4568Septr. 24th. 1760. (Adams Papers)
If I am the Proprietor of an House, and I lease it to any Man, and bind my self to keep it in Repair, it is reasonable and it is Law, that I should have a Rent. So if I am the owner of a ship, and I let it out on a Voyage to the Wist Indies or to Europe it is reasonable, and the maritime Law has made provision that I should have freight. For the sum of Money, that an House or a Ship would...
Though you may think the inclosed Letter from Mr Sears to Mr Marston, out of date; I inclose it to shew you the importance of the Object in View. The little Town of Chatham, is but one among many in Massachusetts Rhode Island Connecticut and New York who have used the Fisheries to advantage. I conjecture the difficulties you have had to encounter. The Fisheries in their utmost extent,...
I am greatly pleased with your letter of the 30 Aug. Every part of it shows a sound understanding & a manly honest heart. Your conduct at the meetings was wise as well as generous. Never mind majorities. Weigh well & judge right & never fear being in a minority. You are right to mix with your fellow citizens at their invitation to their consultations. Although Horatius has sacrificed to the...
45711779. Feb. 2. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Last Tuesday, I dined in Company with the Abbe Raynal, and Mr. Gebelin, and asked them to dine with me, on the then next Sunday. Accordingly the day before Yesterday, they both came. M. Raynal is the most eloquent Man, I ever heard speak in French. His Voice is sharp and clear but pleasant. He talks a great deal, and is very entertaining. M. Gebelin is much less addicted to talking. He is...
Accept my Thanks for your Inaugural Oration. It would have been a great pleasure to me, to have heard it: but at my Age, all Such pleasures are forbidden me. The Edinbourgh Reviewers have Said, that, “if the whole of American Litterature were annihilated with the exception perhaps of something of Franklin, the World would loose nothing of the Usefull or agreable.”! These Gentlemen have merited...
Politicks are forbidden fruit to me, at present, and what other Subject can I choose for a Letter? Shall I tell you what Books I read? or how many times a Week I go into the Woods? These Informations would not be interesting to you. I Suppose I may hint at a Question of Law without giving offence to the Powers that be, or the Powers that once were, but be not . A great noise has been made...
I have received your Letter, and very Sorry you have found So little Success in your affair for the Massachusetts. You have this Consolation, however that you have had as good Luck as any one else. The Series of Events for the last twelve months, which the English represent so favourable to them, and so unfortunate for Us, Seems to have extinguished the little Remains of Credit that We had...
The Favour you granted me on aug. 12 was unluckily packeted with a number of Letters and carried to Leicester, but a certain kind Gentleman has just brought it to hand. I will not lessen the pleasure it gave by a Description. But one detestable quality that usually attends your Letters, I find has stain’d it. I think Phylosophers call it, brevity. But, on second reflection I am not surpriz’d....
I have this morning rec d your kind Letters of 10 & 11 th. of May.— You mention Land bought by D r Phipps which you had mentioned to me: but I have not rec d any Letter from you which hinted at any Land— By this I fear I lost a Letter last monday by some fault in the Post.— however I want no more land at present. A Pew I should like to have, and a double one too if possible.— I shall leave you...
I have recd. your Number 2. June 30th. Number 3 and your June 8th. without number. I am Sorry you did not number this. See with what punctuality your Father numbers all his Letters, and consider the great Advantage of this practice, both to yourself and your Correspondent. Your June 8th is the production of an attentive mind, awake to the novel Sceens and great Objects around you. The Monument...
45781775 Septr. 18. Monday. (Adams Papers)
This Morning John McPherson Esq. came to my Lodging, and requested to speak with me in Private. He is the Owner of a very handsome Country Seat, about five Miles out of this City: is the Father of Mr. McPherson, an Aid de Camp to General Schuyler. He has been a Captain of a Privateer, and made a Fortune in that Way the last War. Is reputed to be well skilled in naval Affairs.—He proposes great...
I am sorry to find by your late Letter what indeed I expected to hear, that my Farm wants manure. I fear by your Expressions that your Crop of Hay falls short. But, there has been an Error in our Husbandry in which We have been very inconsiderate and extravagant, that is in pasturing the Mowing Ground. This will ruin any Farm. The true Maxim of profitable Husbandry is to contrive every Means...
As the best speech in favor of a naval Arm of defence, next to that of Mr Loyd, that was ever made in Congress, at least the best that I have ever read was made by yourself I beg leave to present to you, a first essay towards an history of the rise and progress of an American maritime military power. As I consider a naval power essential, to the preservation of our liberties and independence...
I was last Evening, favoured with your Letter from Vigan of the fourteenth of November, and am very much obliged to you, for writing to me, upon this occasion, a Letter, which notwithstanding your modest and amiable Apologies does the highest Honour, to the Taste and mental Accomplishments of the Writer, and to the Virtues of a Daughter worthy of my excellent friend President Laurens. Believe...
I have been as Civil to Mr Lane who brought me your letter of 26. As I could. He dined with me and I was much pleased with him— I am sincerely grieved at your long continued indisposition, What can I do to restore your health—If you come to the Convention, as I hope you will; That I think will Cure you—For wrangling and Contention exhilarates the Spirits and Animates the Body—You will have...
Amsterdam, 28 Sept. 1780. Dupl ( PCC , No. 84, II, f. 273–276). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:72. Received by Congress on 29 Jan. 1781, this letter contained the statements exchanged by Baron Willem van Wassenaer-Starrenburg and Catherine II, when...
I received yesterday your favor of the 27th of March for which I thank you. The strain of Joy at a late event, and of Panegyrick on the subject of it, serve, among some other Instances to Convince me, that old friendships, when they are well preserved become very strong. The friends of my youth are generally gone The friends of my early political life are chiefly departed—Of the few that...
In the present violent heat of the Weather, and feverish state of my own health, I cannot pretend to sit long at my Pen, and must pray you to accept of a few short hints only. To talk, in a general stile, of Confidence in the French Court & ca. is to use a general language, which may mean almost any thing, or almost nothing.— To a certain degree, and as far as the Treaties and Engagements...
45861772 Decr. 29 [i.e. 28?]. (Adams Papers)
Spent the last Sunday Evening with Dr. Cooper at his House with Justice Quincy and Mr. Wm. Cooper. We were very social and we chatted at large upon Caesar, Cromwell &c. Yesterday Parson Howard and his Lady, lately Mrs. Mayhew, drank Tea with Mrs. Adams. Heard many Anecdotes from a young Gentleman in my Office of Admirall Montagu’s Manners. A Coachman, a Jack Tar before the Mast, would be...
4587[Tuesday Feb. 27. 1776.] (Adams Papers)
On Tuesday Feb. 27. 1776. The order of the day was renewed, but nothing done.
Inclos’d is an answer to the address from the Inhabitants of Hamilton County, which you will forward if you please.— I am Sir— / Your obt. huml. Servt MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The inclosed letter from Mr Taylor one of the Senators from Virginia, as it contains Information which may become useful to the Agriculture of the Northern Parts of America I request the favour of you to communicate it to the American Accademy of Arts and Sciences. I am Sir with great / and Sincere Esteem, your most / obedient Servant MBAt : American Academy of Arts and Letters Collection.
The Charters were quoted or alluded to by Mr Otis frequently in the whole course of his Argument: but he made them, also a more distinct and more Solemn head of his discourse. And here, these Charters ought to be copied verbatim. But an immense Verbiage renders it impossible. Bishop Butler, some where complains of this enormous abuse of Words in publick Transactions and John Reed and...
I rec d , last Week, at Amsterdam, your Favour of Dec r. 27. and Sympathize, most Sincerely with you, in your Affliction but I Still hope, M rs Ridley will recover. As an Article in our Confederation, Stipulates, that “no State Shall confer any Title of Nobility” and as the Genius of our Governments is averse to all Such Distinctions, I am no Friend to the Errand of Major L’Enfant. I wonder,...
My Letters to you are an odd Mixture. They would appear to a Stranger, like the Dish which is sometimes called Omnium Gatherum. This is the first Time, I believe that these two Words were ever put together in Writing. The litteral Interpretation of them, I take to be “A Collection of all Things.” But as I said before, the Words having never before been written, it is not possible to be very...
4593Avril Vingt Neuf. Mercredi. (Adams Papers)
J’ai bien dormi, le derniere Soir. J’avois diné chez Le Marrechal De Maillebois avec Baucoup du Monde. Apres diner, went to the Accademy of Sciences and heard Mr. D’Alembert pronounce Eulogies upon divers Members deceased. On this occasion occurred the famous encounter—and embrace—between Voltaire and Franklin, described more fully in JA ’s Autobiography under this date . Voltaire, who was 84,...
4594March 18 [i.e. 19?]. Monday (Adams Papers)
This whole Day is dedicated to walking, riding, talk, &c. No Reading to day. Twas Avarice, not Compassion that induced to pass the last Court. He was afraid that Pen would be provoked to appeal both to the Superior Court if he put both in suit, and so keep him out of his Money for 6 or 8 months. 6 months without Interest. Tis fear of loosing the Interest upon Interest that induces him to pass...
I continue to live over again. De Grimm. Tome 3d Derncire Parte, page 304, has entertained me with the following Anecdote, “Mr Beaumarchais, has obtained finally, a reparation for his little retreat to Saint Lazere. In the first place, more than a Million has been paid to him, on his Accounts with the Government. In the Second he has received from Monsieur De Callone a Letter, infinitely...
45961775. Fryday. Septr. 22. (Adams Papers)
Mr. Gordon spent the Evening here.
Were I to follow, the feelings of my heart I Should write you every day. But you remember Dr Winships “too serious an Affair.” I cannot write a line, without fear of hurting you, or your Occupations: for every Letter is opened. I have resigned the Chair of the A. of A: & Sciences, and that of Agricultural Society and am consequently an entire Freman. From the latter I have recd a civil Letter:...
Inclosed is a recommendation from Gen. Thayer one of our Massachusetts Senators of Mr. Augustus Hunt, to be an officer. By his personal appearance he will make a very handsome & a well made stout lieutenant, you may put him on the list accordingly, if you please. &c I am &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Dr. Leonard will have the honour to inclose this Letter, which is merely to inform you that he came over in the Same ship with me, and that from all I have Seen or heard of him, he is a very honest and inoffensive Man. By his own Account he has had great Experience in various Manufactures, and has been totally ruined, for a Suspicion that he meditated Sending to America Maps and Plans of...
An Address has been transmitted to me from the youth of Richmond, Subscribed by J. H. Fouchee as Chairman and Geo Poindexter as Secretary. There is very visible in it, the gallant Spirit of youth, unenervated by Effeminacy, and worthy as far as Ennergy and decision will go, worthy of the best of Causes. If there are Indications of Prejudices and Misinformation, they are the more to be...