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The Times Are much Altered Since your Administration, Thousands are released from hard Taxes, And the Union at large are eased of many thousands of Dollars, by your Justice, may you long live to Administer Justice to all your fellow Citizens— But there is one thing more in Justice you Ought To Do, humanity Calls loudly on you & the rest of the Rulers to do (And that is the FREEDOM of the...
Letter not found : from Abraham Ackerman, 5 Oct. 1779. On 9 Oct., GW wrote Ackerman: “I have received Your Letter of the 5th Instant.”
an unfurtuanate Man addresses You with these Lines though Scarsly worthy of Your Notice on account of its Iregular stile & Compossure—But would most Humbly begg pardon for the Intrussion & wish You to exuse me for attempting to trouble You with so lenghty a Scrawlling & so poorly Connected & spelled Sir I embarked in the Earliest Day of the American Revolution went with the faithful Genl....
[Philadelphia] Gazette of the United States , June 4, 1792. Part of the column devoted to correspondence in the June 4, 1792, issue of the Gazette of the United States is attributed to H by Philip Marsh (“Further Attributions to Hamilton’s Pen,” The New-York Historical Society Quarterly , XL [October, 1956], 353–54). No other evidence, however, of H’s authorship has been found.
I have the opertunity of Informing you that I have had the misfortune to loose my Schooner which was Captured By the British on the 26 of Sept Last Being loaded and Bound for Baltimore and sir I hav Bin on Board the British with A civil othority and they informd me that she Dradg her anchors and went on Shore in lin haven Bay in A gaile of wind and that the Virginiaans Stript hir and Cut Away...
The Students of Dickinson–College, assembled again after the usual vacation, embrace the earliest opportunity of making a public and explicit declaration of their sentiments and resolutions, at this important crisis. Believing that unanimity is of infinite importance to the Citizens of these States, and that the most unequivocal proofs of such unanimity should be now given by the Citizens at...
I take the liberty to inclose to your Excellency, a letter, which was entrusted to my care by Sir Edward Newenham of Dublin, who desired me to deliver it in person, an honour which I should certainly have done myself, had I not been detained in this part of the Country by business, & by the contagious fever, which, I am extremely sorry to find, prevails at Philadelphia. As I am thus under a...
I had the honour of receiving your favour in course of post, and as I did not know of any person going to Philadelphia, with whom I could entrust your model, I delivered it to Mr. Remsen, informing of the precautions necessary to be observed in forwarding it, and I hope that before this time you have received it in perfect safety. The greatest care was taken, on board the Ship, to put it into...
I have the honour to inform you, that I have just arrived here in the Ship Amsterdam Packet, after a passage of 68 days from London. Mr. Pinckney did me the honour to entrust to my care several packets addressed to you, two of which you will receive by this post, and I also send by the Coach two parcels of Newspapers, from Mr. Pinckney, and one, of which I wish to request his Excellency the...
Although I have Suffered, (by the hand of lawless power,) Injurys in my person, my reputation and my property; Injurys to me irreparable though unmerited; Yet as an American firmly and unaltrably attached to my Country; and capable of distinguishing in my Judgment and resentments betwixt its Government, & those who may for a time be entrusted to Administer it: I shall always feel it my duty,...
The Petition of John Adams, humbly Sheweth, That your petitioner hath been convicted at the Circuit Court of the United States for the district of Pennsylvania, of smuggling a small quantity of Coffee, for which Offence he hath agreeably to Law been sentenced to pay a fine of four hundred Dollars, all which will more fully appear to your Excellency, by the Certified transcripts from the...
It gives me uneasiness while I am obliged to intrude, more especially, where objects of greater moment requires your Excellencys Attention. Since ordered by your Excellency’s Command to this Place in Febry 1779, I have at all times made it my study to descharge my duty to the Utmost of my abillity. The Post being a thuroughfare, the Interest in a great measure mutual, laid me under the...
Please allow me to tell you how honored I am to bear your name, and how much more so I would be, had I the honor of being descended from your family. All that one reads or hears about the sublimity of your enlightenment leads one to form such wishes. How happy I would be, sir, if the similarity of our names could make you take an interest in me! I dare flatter myself that under your...
Je vous prie de me permmettre De vous temoigner combien je Suis flattè D’avoir L’honneur de porter votre nom, Et je le Serois bien davantage, si j’avois celuy D’Etre issus de votre famille tout çe qu’on lit Et ceque L’on Entend Dire de la Sublimité de vos lumieres, Est certainement bien fait pour former de pareils Desirs. Que je serois heureux, monsieur, si la Similitude de nom pouvoit vous...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Permettez qu’au lieu de me reclamer de quelquun pour vous prier d’une grace, j’aie l’honneur de vous presenter une piece de vers à laquelle les sentimens que vous avez inspirés ont donné sujet. Ce moien de recommandation ne sera gueres puissant aupres de vous, Monsieur, J’en conviens, vous êtes trop accoutumé aux éloges et trop sûr de les obtenir. Cependant...
I am favoured with yours and have given particular Attention to the Contents, it gives me some relief, when you say you are not, nor has been prejudiced with me. Concious I am, that to my knowledge I never did any thing to merite it. If I have not been so fortunate for some time past as I had a reasonable prosspect of my endeavours has in no respect been the Less I am Subjected to good & bad...
I am favoured with yours, as Also for Mr Young which I have delivered him; he seems Satissfyed with your proposal and senceable that he will save more than he Could in Such a place as Bladensburgh from the Wages he had there, And now waits upon you himself —I have Dropt two lines to the Doctr desereing to let me know if there was any particular reason for his leaveing his Employ when I receive...
I had the pleasure of writeing you the 20th Instant, Incloseing a letter from Mr Lund Washington which he was desireous should be forwarded you by first Opertunity, I then informed you we had not found out the person you depended on for transacting your Bussiness in regard to the Land purchased from Messrs Dow & Makian , but have now the pleasure to Inform you that in Two Hours after the...
Inclosed I have the Honour to transmit you a Copy of a New Work , of which I am the proprietor, and of which I have already lodged a Copy in the Office of the Clerk of the District Court agreeable to Law. I am Sir, with due Respect, Your Most Obedient And Most Hble Servt., RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by Remsen as received 16 Aug. 1791 but not recorded in SJL . The enclosed new work was a...
The Pall or Black Cloath that was sent down to you on a late Occation Mr Carlyle Informs me was Originally your property, but as we are yet unprovided with one in town we must request the favour of you to send it by the bearer—Our Friend and Accquantance Mr Joseph Wattson Departed this life last night about Eleven oClock of a Bloody Flux, he neglectd himself much in the begining of the...
Our Rum Petition and also one for the Inspection of herrings was forwarded to you yesterday by Post and hope it will be in time. along with each there is a little Memorandum for your peruseall, As the greatest difficulty seems to Arise in raiseing a Sum equivolent to that now raised on Rum imported I am in great hopes that will in some measure be Obviated when the Mode now proposed is duely...
I am favoured with yours and Observe the Contents I am very senceable of the dissadvantages a person must Labour under who wants experimental knowledge in any undertakeing whatever & more especially in the plan that you have to execute at present. And that James Clievland is by farr a properer person for such Bussiness, but what Induced me to think of recomending Mr Young, was you mentioning...
The many Obligations I have been, and Still think my[self] under to you Oblidges me by this Opertunity to truble you with a few lines And for a Moment Interupt from Matters of Much greater Consequence. Mr Lund Washington and I have Settled all the Acctts that Subsisted between you & I, and has received the Ball[anc]e in full for which I have his receipt. I cannot help Observeing to you, that...
Im favoured with yours and Observe the Contents your Orders by the Adventure shall be pointedly and particularly taken notice of —I was this Morning a good deal Alarmed when we began to Overhaul your Herrings the first 3 or 4 Barrels we opned were in exceeding Bad Order On the top they were laid in promisscously without either form of packing or Salt and most of those they were filled up with...
In regard to your Design of importing Palantines into Virginia I beleve it would be attended with some difficulty from severall Circumstances, they are in generall much prejudiced against comeing into Virginia or Maryland as in either they are not allowed the same liberty of Concience in enjoying their own Religion, this Naturealy Inclines them more to Pensilvania, as well as the Number of...
Letter not found: from Robert Adam, 28 July 1774. The letter is described in the Parke-Bernet catalog no. 63, entry 380, 16–17 Nov. 1938: “Introducing a gentleman who wanted to establish a general post office through America, and about a dispute with Colonel Fairfax.” The dispute with George William Fairfax was undoubtedly over the sale of the bloomery. See Samuel Athawes to GW, 8 April 1774 ,...
Whilst all Denomination’s of People bless the happy occasion of your Excellency’s return to enjoy private and domestic felecity, Permit us Sir, (the Members of Lodge No. 39 lately establish’d in Alexandria) to assure Your Excellency that We as a Mystical Body rejoice in having a Brother so near us, Whose pre’eminent Benevolence has secured the Happiness of Millions, and that We shall esteem...
With this you will receive three petitions to be laid before your honorable House respecting the duty on Rum, an inlargement of our Town, draining the Marsh lots &c. the other is relative to the Herring fishery which you well know, is become very considerable and therefore worthy of Attention. Perhaps it may be only necessary to say something respecting the inlargement of our Town & the other...
The bearer hereof Mr Young is a young man that came a perfet Stranger to me about three years ago enquireing for employmt as an Assistant or Clerk And from his appearance then I thought there was something promiseing in his looks or that bid fair for doing well haveing at that time no occation for any person my self I recomended him to Doctr Ross who I had heard say wanted such a person, he...
We take the liberty to enclose you a copy of a letter, received from our friends Messrs. Ruys & Zimmerman at Amsterdam, respecting our Ship James Adams, Captain Bangs, which vessel left our capes the 8th. November last, bound for Amsterdam, with a cargo of colonial produce, all american property, accompanied with the proper and usual Certificates of neutrality, as well as those of importation...
The inclosed Copies of a Correspondence , are most respectfully submitted by Your most obedient & very humble Servants RC ( DLC : Rare Book and Special Collections Division); at foot of text: “The President of the United States.” Enclosure: see below. Abijah Adams (1754–1816) of Boston, worked for his younger brother Thomas Adams as clerk and bookkeeper for the Boston Independent Chronicle ,...
I have lived to see the close of the third year of our seperation. This is a Melancholy Anniversary to me; and many tender Scenes arise in my Mind upon the recollecttion. I feel unable to sustain even the Idea, that it will be half that period e’er we meet again. Life is too short to have the dearest of its enjoyments curtaild. The Social feelings grow Callous by disuse and lose that pliancy...
A private opportunity offering by way of Hamburgh to write to you, I eagerly embrace it, and hope it may reach you safely notwithstanding the various Chances it may run. your arrival at Berlin was made known to us from your Letters to the secretary of state of Nov’ br the 10th and 17 th . no private Letter has yet been received, nor the publick Letter which you mention having written from...
Yes I have been Sick confined to my chamber with a slow fever. I have been unhappy through anxiety for my dear Boy, and still am apprehensive of our terrible coast should he come upon it, besides the tormenting cruizers infest our Bay with impuinity and take every thing. You have heard I suppose that the passengers all left the Ship and went to Bilboa upon Gillions abusive treatment of them....
I received your Letter of Jan’ry 23 d and was gratified to find your Hand writing improving. I know you are attentive to what is passing in the political World, indeed who can be an indifferent Spectator, in Times so critical, so allarming and so big with Concequences as the present? I send you a late publication under the signature of scipio, [ “ ]Reflections on Monroe’s view of the conduct...
Tho I have already acknowledged all your Letters, I will not let captain Scoet sail without a few lines from me, I had not time to write you by Barnard, but Cushing had Letters for you I write now to inform you, that the more quarrelsome and turbulent you grow, the more anxious I am to be with you, not that I think it pleasent fishing in troubled waters, but because immagination paints higher...
I have but little news to write you. Every thing of that kind you will learn by a more accurate hand than mine; things remain much in the same situation here that they were when you went away, there has been no Desent upon the sea coast. Guards are regularily kept, and people seem more settled, and are returning to their husbandry.—I feel somewhat lonesome. Mr. Thaxter is gone home, Mr. Rice...
At length the mistery is unravelld, and by a mere accident I have come to the knowledge of what you have more than once hinted at. A Letter of Mrs. Shippen addressed to Mrs. A. but without any christian Name or place of abode, was put into my Hands Supposed for me, I opened and read it half through before I discoverd the mistake. Ought Eve to have laid it by then when so honestly come at? But...
The President received yesterday your obliging favour of May 29 th : accompanied by two of your Fast Sermons. permit me sir to be the organ of his acknowledgment to you for them; A Friend had Sent him one a week before; which he read with pleasure and Satisfaction. It is indeed, a consolatary reflection amidst the weight of cares which press upon him from every quarter and the dangers which...
I have not any Letter from you of a later date than the 9th; you was then unwell. I have one from william of the 12th. as he does not mention your being still indisposed I hope it was only occasiond by the Thaw, and the close air of the Theatre. I have myself been confined for a week, but got down stairs yesterday, and hope I have parted with some of my bad humours , by the application of...
I received your two kind favours last Evening of march 2 d & 8 th . the seasons I belive have been very near alike both here and with you. we have had several days of warm & muggy weather, the Ground thawing the slug & miller very industerous, and as the Scripture assures us that tis Lawfull to do good upon the Sabbeth, my people are employd in Annoying these destructive Enemies, who make not...
I received Yesterday Yours of May 28 th I inclose you the account of Money sent you, including what is now in this Letter. if I should not remit you any more untill I come; I will then Settle the remainder. I do not expect to leave here untill the first of July. I shall rejoice if it may be then. I have wanted the P——t to get you to draw for 2000 dollors which I think might be spaird, and to...
Two days only are wanting to campleat six years since my dearest Friend first crost the Atlantick. But three months of the Six Years have been Spent in America. The airy delusive phantom Hope, how has she eluded my prospects. And my expectations of your return from month to month, have vanished “like the baseless Fabrick of a vision.” You invite me to you, you call me to follow you, the most...
As I did not write you by the last conveyance I will not omit the present. I supposed your sister had got a Letter for You, but I found afterwards that she did not send it, because she could not please herself. This Week I received your trunk which Mr. Dana brought with him. You cannot conceive the pleasure I took in looking it over. The Books it is true were in a language that I understand...
It was not till last Evening that I received Your Letters of Febry 2 d 4 & 7 th . the post did not get in which was Due on twesday till Saturday. I do not know how to pass a week without hearing from You. I received newspapers to the Tenth. in those I have an account of the Declaration. it was a Solemn Scene to You, and an affecting one. You will find by my Letter of the 8 th that I was with...
The Weather has been & held so uncommonly cold ever since you left Me, that I had no expectation of getting a line from you untill you reachd N york, but that line I have not yet received, and by this Time I presume you have reachd the city of Sedition, the Hot bed of France; I wrote you this Day week, and inclosed to you our Sons Letters. Gen ll Lincoln & mrs Lincoln Dined with Me yesterday...
Mr. Cranch informs me that Hones will go to Town tomorrow, and that I may not miss one opportunity, have now taken my pen to thank you for yours by Tom, and also for that which I have just now received by Mr. Ayres. You seem in high Spirits at which you know I rejoice. Your minute description of the persons you have seen, are very entertaining to me. I cannot consent you should omit writing,...
I Congratulate you my dear son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing, as your Father can inform you, and to the very low state of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of Welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
As your good Lady had promised me the favour of a visit before your return to your Native Town, give me leave sir to request a compliance with the promise and that you would do me the Honour of accompanying her here. I wish sir to be informed by you with regard to the situation of my absent Friend and what congress propose to do with him. The publication of a report of a committe of Congress...
Mr. Lorthorp call’d here this Evening and brought me yours of the 1 of October a day which will ever be rememberd by me, for it was the most distressing one I ever experienced. That morning I rose and went into my Mothers room, not apprehending her so near her Exit, went to her Bed with a cup of tea in my hand, raised her head to give it to her, she swallowed a few drops, gaspd and fell back...