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Results 1921-1950 of 183,496 sorted by date (descending)
I send you by this mail some of my recent lucubrations, of which I request your acceptance. I flatter myself into the hope that some of the facts & reasonings on them, will fully establish the soundness of the Hamiltonian System of policy, of which I have been the unceasing advocate for nine years. Until it is fully adopted by this Country, we shall never enjoy the high degree of prosperity...
Taking the white sheet in which the papers were wrapped, for a mere envelope; I did not notice your "iterum", until I came to put away my letters, after my last to you was despatched. The extract you desire, is now enclosed. Mr Gilmer’s information leaves it uncertain whether the contract be in this county, or with his uncle, in Liberty. To the latter, I shall write by the first mail. In the...
J. Madison has received the copy of the "Observations on the proposed amendment of Mr. Foot", with which Mr. Van Buren has favored him. Tho’ not according with some of the views applied to the occasion, he is fully sensible of the ability and advantage with which all of them are presented. J. M begs Mr. Van Buren to be assured of his great esteem, and to accept a return of his best wishes, in...
It is much to be regretted that most subscribers to newspapers are negligent in remitting the small sums which, although comparatively nothing to individual subscribers, form, when multiplied by thousands, as in my case, an amount of great moment. Struggling under many difficulties, I have been compelled to contract heavy debts, under the hope that those who have taken my paper will furnish...
Wishing a safe & early conveyance for a letter to Mr. Maury our Consul at Liverpool, I take the liberty of enclosing it with a request that you will be so good as to forward it by the 1st. vessel bound thither from Philada. & under the care of a friendly passenger, if there be such an one. Pardon this trouble & be assured my dear Sir of the continuance of my cordial esteem & of all my best...
My search among the papers here, has proved equally ineffectual. I shall see Mr Gilmer to-day, however; and, ascertaining from him where his late uncle’s papers are, obtain that in question with as little delay as possible. I was sorry to learn, on further enquiry, that the report concerning Mr Wirtembaker is unfounded: he certainly remains, I am told, during the next session. Perhaps,...
I have searched the papers here in vain, for the power of attorney; and it will be impossible to return to Monticello and get back, in time for to-day’s post. You may expect to hear from me again, by the next. Meanwhile, with thanks for the English papers, accept my affectionate salutations RC ( ViHi : Nicholas P. Trist Album Book). Docketed by James Madison.
Do me the favor to have the enclosed handed to Genl. Cocke, if he should be at your Court on Monday: if not, to let it go on to him by the mail. I take this occasion to thank you for the statement sent me for the gentleman in Kentucky. It came in good time, and ought not to have been allowed to interfere with any of your official attentions. With great esteem & friendly respects RC ( ViU ).
Your favor of Jany 29-30. with the interesting Gazettes then & afterwards kindly sent, have been duly recd. Your friend Mr Hagarty has not yet afforded me an opportunity for the welcome I shall feel a pleasure in giving him, over my threshold. Your advice to the Tobacco Planters is very good but it will not be followed for 3 reasons: 1. because good advice it apt to be disregarded. 2. because...
I have recd. your two letters of Mar. 30. and Apl. 1. the letter inclosing a copy of the contract with Mr. Long; to which I must ask the favor of you to add a copy of the power of attorney to Mr. Gilmer to enter into such engagements. I ought to have done this in the first instance. I feel the greater regret in imposing the trouble, now that I learn the new calls on your time in which it will...
I recd. by the last mail your letter of the 2d. inst. on the subject of the negroes of Mrs. Smith & her son, under sentence of death for the assault which proved mortal to one of mine. My inadequate knowledge of the circumstances on which the degree of their guilt, and their title to clemency may depend, makes it proper for me to leave with those best acquainted with the whole case, the...
I recd. yesterday yours of the 29th. ult: inclosing your correspondence with Docr. Jones. It is quite probable, not withstanding his dissatisfaction at what has passed, that he may still look forward to the chance of having the way opened for him to the vacant Chair in the University, by some intermediate proceeding of the Visitors. Should this not be done, he seems to have shut himself out...
Mr. Gallatin forwarded to me, by the last Liverpool Packet, your letters to Mr. Brown and to the Messrs. Baring. They have been sent as respectively addressed, and I now enclose three papers, which will make you acquainted with the present state of the funds of the Virginia University in Europe; viz. 1. a general account current between the University and the Ministers in London, who have...
I have duly recd. your letter of Mar. 30. No apology was necessary for the enquiry it makes. I regret only that I am unable to furnish the information wanted. In the year 1772. I was in a distant State, where I recd. a part of my Education, and if the Expedition under Capt. Wilder for the discovery of a N. W. passage came at any time to my knowledge, it has [ ] entirely out of my recollection:...
You have obliged us very much by your favor of the 29th. ult. It gave us the first knowledge of the accident to Payne. Altho’ it guards us against unfavorable reports, it leaves us very anxious to learn that the progress of his recovery corresponds with your anticipations. We ask the favor of you also to let us know from whom the medical aid was obtained, and whether he has yet been able to...
The subject of my communication, will plead my apology for this intrusion upon your retirement. The whole of your public life is as strongly marked with mercy as with intelligence, for no one I beleive, was ever recommended to your clemency, to whom your heart did not cheerfully extend pardon. The conviction that prejudicd and malicd, which too often sway weak minds has no place in your bosom...
(promissory note) $1200 Sixty days after date I promise to pay to the order of Richard Smith Cashier of the office of Discount and Deposit Washington, at said office, the sum of Twelve hundred Dollars, for value received— Ms (NN) .
A steady rain all day yesterday prevented my going to the University then. The hour at which the mail closes just allows me time to send you a copy of the Contract with Mr Long —which I have selected, thinking it might be the one you have occasion for—The others are in substance the same. If copies of them are wanted, please drop me a line to that effect. Affectionately, Your very devoted...
Before committing myself as I did in my letter of the 29 of January, I ought to have been better informed than I now find I had been, when I wrote it. And must correct as soon as I can a mis-statement, lest you, under the sanction of perhaps, the oldest Tobacco merchant in Europe , should quote him: therefore, instead of "for the purpose of imparting flavor to their flavorless Trash" be so...
By the kindness of the Vice President, I am enabled to foward a set of the Fredoniad as the work relates to the valued services rendered this Country in her days of Trial, I have fowarded the 4 Vls for your inspection, we are trusting to the merits of the work, and a liberal public, to assist in paying the printer—Such Gentlemen as I foward the work too If they think the work honourable to the...
After apologizing for the liberty I take as a stranger in addressing you will you permit me to ask you if you are acquainted with the fact of a Brig called the Diligence, Capt Wilder, having been sent from Virginia in 1772 by a number of gentlemen, for the purpose of discovering a North West passage ? If so would you have the goodness by an early mail to inform me of any particulars with which...
J Madison presents his best respects to Mr. McDuffie and returns his thanks for the copy of the "Report on the state of the Public Finances" politely sent him. A perusal of the Report has left him under a just impression of the marked ability with which it is drawn up. He must be permitted at the same time to say, that the Theoretic views taken of some branches of the subject discussed,...
I have to acknowledge your two favors of the 8th & 27th instant. The last came to hand yesterday evening, too late to be answered effectually (the papers being at the University) by this morning’s mail; and you will, in consequence, not receive the copy you desire, till wednesday: a delay from which I hope no inconvenience will result. For the account of the London University, which is an...
Yours of the 9 Inst. inclosing Mr. Lawrences letter reached me in due course of Mail. Whatever we may have thought of Doctor Jones’ claims upon us he has taken a course which has left us entirely at liberty in future, by writing in answer to the letter referr’d to in yours, that he considers himself put out of nomination by our determination to deferr the appointment. His letter, with a copy...
You will doubtless be surprised to find that I am here. It was my intention to have remained in Illinois until next winter, but circumstances, which I will explain when I have the pleasure of seeing you, induced me very suddenly to change my determination, and to come on by the most direct route to this place. I shall remain here and in NewYork until some time about the first of May, when I...
I had the pleasure to receive yours of the 20th. by yesday’s mail. The letter from the governor, communicating our reappointment as Visitors of the University, and requiring a meeting of the board on the first Monday in next month, I had receiv’d, as I had one, from Mr Cabell, apprizing me, that it was a mere measure of form, in complyance with the law, & there would be no necessity for the...
I owe & offer you many thanks for your favour, in procuring & forwarding the reprinted portion of the Legislative Journals. They were duly recd. thro’ that of General Dade. Unluckily the volume does not reach the dates I wished to see, being limited to the year 1780. I have requested Col. Peyton to procure the Journals for 1784-5-6-7: if they should be merely struck off, and can be had from...
I am sorry to take up my pen, when the only object is to impose a tax on yours. Be so good as to let me have, from the University papers left by Mr. Jefferson, a copy of the contract made by Mr. Gilmer, with the Professors, engaged in England. Affectionate salutations. RC ( DLC : Nicholas P. Trist Papers).
I duly received your letter of the 18th. Inst. with the Morning Chronicles for which you will be pleased to accept our united Thanks. It was my duty to have forwarded you the accompanying letter at the commencement of the Session. I was not clearly, however, aware of my Duty and now, that I have been informed of it, hasten to supply the defect. You will be kind enough to do with it as you...
Previous to the receipt of yours of the 8th. inst: I had recd. a letter from Mr. Lawrence our Chargè d’Affaires in London, from which it appeared that the enquiries instituted by Mr. Gallatin for a Professor of Nat: Philos:, were continued by him, but without such an assurance of success as I conceived ought to arrest the pursuit of a satisfactory appointment here; against which it was...