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J. Madison with his best respects to Col: Coles, requests the favor of him to have the enclosed delivered to his brother, if in the neighbourhood. Should he have left it, and be out of immediate reach, Col C. will be so obliging as to return it to me, with a notice of the most expedient address for a letter to his brother. [printer’s fist] The enclosed letter contains a check on the B. Bank of...
Being a Virginian and having had the pleasure in my Earlier days of often Seeing and hearing you together with the interest which I feel in the present political contest in the South must be my apology for obtruding myself upon you in this manner The good and wise I know may be always safely approached by the humblest of their fellow Citizens when instruction is their object Accompanying this...
Permit me to present you, through my friend Mr. Crabb, of Philadelphia, now on a patriotic pilgrimage to Montpelier, the portrait (lithographed) of that distinguished patriot Amos Kendall—who, for efficient emulation of your brilliant services in support of that Democracy whose applause hath made your name immortal—is now traduced and vilified as much even as you have been by that same spirit,...
I recd. in the due time your letter of Aug. 11. But in my present condition I have been obliged to spare the use of the pen as much as possible, especially when an answer was not pressing, and I could give none that could be of much importance. It may well be supposed that at my age, and after a lapse of nearly 30 years, my memory must be a very fallible resort for information as to...
Unless the day should be unfavorable, Mrs Trist & myself & children will set out to-morrow, to dine at Gordonsville, and reach Montpellier in the evening. Cornelia & Mary, and one of Mr. Randolph’s younger daughters (Cary Ann) will follow the next tuesday; and we propose all to leave you on the ensuing friday evening, so as to be in Washington the next day. I thought, when last with you, that...
On the credit of the inclosed letter of introduction from an ancient colleague of the early services of your great career, permit me to solicit, at your perfect ease and convenience, some attention to events in our history. It is not unknown to you, the deep excitement which in 1806 seized the public mind of Ky. in regard to early Spanish intrigues in 1788, to detach the State from the...
I must apologize for the great delay in acknowledging your letter of Apl. 20th, by referring, (now a common and necessary resort) to the feebleness of age, accompanied by severe & continued inroads on my health. My respect for your object, would make it very agreeable to me, to aid it in the way you mention. But on looking into the parcels of pamphlets I possess, I find none that would supply...
Ever since certain evil minded persons entered the Navy-yard at Charlestown, and beheaded the full-length figure of President Jackson fixed on the stem of the renowned Ship Constitution, riot & midnight misrule had become in a measure epidemic. A Roman Catholic Convent or Nunnery, a spacious establishment, in the neighborhood of Bunker-hill, within cannon-shot of the centre of Boston, was...
J. M. presents his thanks to Professor Dew for the Copy of his Essay on Usury. The subject being very ably handled, will doubtless aid in dissipating the erroneous views of it which have so long prevailed. FC (DLC) .
J. M. with his respects to Mr. Gilpin acknowledges the receipt of his able & eloquent Speech on the 4th. of July. The delay in returning his thanks for it, has an apology in the decrepit state of his health, of which he is obliged in this as in other cases to avail himself. FC (DLC) .
J. Madison with his respects to Mr Southard returns him many thanks for his biographical discourse on Mr Wirt. The character of this meritorious Citizen is a rich theme for eloquent and instructive comments; of which the discourse is a signal & happy illustration. RC (NjP) ; FC (DLC) . In an unknown hand, signed by JM.
I am sensible of the delay in acknowledging your letter of and regret it. But apart from the crippled condition of my health, which almost forbids the use of the pen, I could not forget that I was to speak of occurrences after a lapse of 20 years, & at an age in its 84th year; circumstances so readily and for the most part, justly referred to, as impairing the confidence due to recollections &...
In returning my thanks, which I do most heartily, for your letter of the 29th ulto, I must be permitted to express my regret that it was not quite as full as I could have wished. Perhaps my apprehension of ill consequences from the late usurpations and abuses of power by the President, & the great confidence I have in the soundness & influence of your opinions, may have led me to expect too...
I have been much distress’d to hear, that you have lately been so ill as to be given over by your Physcians, since which, I am happy to learn from an authentic source, that you have got much better, & in a fair way of being restored to your usual state of health. God grant that your health may be renovated, & that you may live for many years, not only on account of yourself, family, & friends,...
It is with a great degree of diffidence that I intrude on your advanced age and retirement with this Epistle. But hope It will a sufficient apology for this intrusion when I say to you that I am but a youth and that my sole object in thus troubling you is to acquire information on a subject of the most vital importance to the safety of our beloved Country. Knowing full well from your venerable...
Suffer me to ask a favour of you (as a Relic and a testimonial of that Regard that a father would have to his son) to write to me, your favour & Letter will be Transfixd with my father’s letters and writings. (Samuel Clark of the Revolutionary War who fought under the Immortal Layfeatte . Layfeatte is no more . the Great & Good Layfayaet is no more!! his last advice to us was, according to the...
In transmitting the enclosed letter for Mrs. Madison, I cannot resist the impulse of my feelings in communicating to you my best wishes for your continued happiness, and for the improvement of your health, and that you may live to see the clouds dissipated that darken our political horison. With my best respects to Mrs. Madison I beg you to receive the assurances of my unabated consideration &...
I have received your two letters of June 4th & 11th. with their enclosures. The letter to your brother records a touching incident in the life of Lafayette, a life which if history does it justice, will fill some of its most conspicuous & interesting pages. Observing that Mr. Adams had been designated by Congress to prepare an Obituary Memoir of the man so much admired and beloved by our...
I inclose a letter for Mr. George Joy of London, which I request the favor of you to have delivered. I am anxious that it should not fail to reach him. In compliance with your letter of—I forwarded to you the autograph lines which were wished. I hope the letter got safely to hand. With cordial salutations FC (DLC) .
It was with much reluctance I gave up the idea of calling to see you on my way to the Mountains, but, I had never been through the Shenandoah Valley, and as we (My Wife, and my eldest Son) took our departure from Baltimore, I went to Harper’s Ferry by the way of the railroad, as far as Fredericktown in Maryland, and then took a Carriage to the Potomac. Following that fine Valley to Staunton,...
Private. A circumstance came to my knowledge the other day, which, as (according to the impressions which prevail here) it may have some connexion with your affairs, I deem it proper to communicate to you. Mr. Eugene Vail some time since rented of the Newells a house (marked V’s house) adjoining the ground in possession of Mr. Cutts. V’s father in law, a wealthy monied man of New York,...
I have received, my dear Sir, your favor of the 17th. The motives to it are as precious to me, as its object is controvertible. You have certainly presented your views of the subject with great skill and great force. But you have not sufficiently adverted to the position I have assumed, and which has been accorded or rather assigned to me by others, of being withdrawn from party agitations, by...
Your favor of the 25th came duly to hand. There was a reason for the application to G going from you which I intended, but forgot at the moment, to state. Of this, however, another time. Every day has been devoted to the examination of Mr. J’s papers: beginning at the beginning, & coming down regularly. I have almost got through, and at every step something occurs to confirm my own opinion, &...
I have recd. yours of the 20th. and inclose a fair copy of so much of Mr. Jefferson’s letter to me as relates to the resolutions of 98-99. The letter is dated Augt. 23d. not 28th but is so identical with the printed letter to Mr. W. C. Nicholas as to prove that one of the dates is erroneous. I return the letter of Mr. W. C. N. which I found in the letter of Mr. J. I find no letter from Mr. J....
The Bearer Mann Butler Esqr has for some time past been engaged in writing the History of Kentucky, & is now on a visit to Virginia & Washington City in quest of papers, & materials, necessary to enable him to complete the object he has in view; which he will cheerfully explain to you. Mr Butler has resided for many years in this State & has ever supported the character of a Gentleman of honor...
Since my return here (last friday) I have been engaged in the examination of Mr. Jefferson’s papers, for materials to put the measures of ’98-’99 in their true light, and thus to vindicate his memory & that of his co-laborers from the deep reproach of having given birth to the doctrine of Nullification as now understood. I have found several precious things, among which is the memorandum of...
I have received, Fellow Citizens, your letter of the 1st Instant inviting me in the name of a large number of Democratic Republicans of your county to a public dinner to be given on the 23d to the Honble John M. Patton, their Representitive in Congress. My continued debility from age and sickness not permitting me to accept the invitation, I can only express my grateful acknowledgements for...
Your favour of the 30th. ulto. with its enclosures would have been received with unmingled pleasure, but for the alloy of its intimations with regard to the state of your health—The partial relief which you have recently enjoyed, I will hope may have been symptomatic of a more general renovation, and reserve for you yet years of comfort and tranquility to witness the continual gigantic growth...
On a recent occasion, when one of the States of the Union promulgated doctrines subversive of the principles of the Constitution, and assumed an attitude which endangered the peace of the Confederation, you stepped forward from your retirement in a manner creditable to your head & heart to correct the aberration, and explain that constitutional Chart of which you had been the chief draftsman....
My eldest son Charles, the bearer of this letter, in coming to visit the Springs of Virginia, is unwilling to pass within any reasonable distance of your house without calling to have the pleasure of paying his respects to you & Mrs. Madison—I understood lately from Governor Coles that your health is much restored. I heartily wish it may be such as to enable you to enjoy your accustomed life,...
We had heard of your indisposition with sympathy & regret, & of your recovery with sincere pleasure. Associations which recall remembrances of passed events for the space of thirty eight years in more happy days, are not easily effaced from the memory, however time rank, & distance, may weaken the impression— Manners & customs are strangely altered in this disfranchised Metropolis of the...
My Son Doctr. Spotswood will leave us today for Philadelphia, he expects to spend a few days with his friends in Orange, by him I have sent you a fair Specimen of the salt made at the furnace of Donally, Noyes & Patrick which Salt is made by Steam Evaporation the furnice is situated immediately on the Banks of the great Kenhawa, It is a building of considerable length well covered in The...
Although your favour of March 28th accompanying the " History of the Bank " has been so long on hand, the continued inroads on my health, have not permitted me even yet to do more than glance at the Contents of the volume. From that I perceive that it comprizes information which must be extensively acceptable; particuarly to those engaged in political & historical researches. I sincerly wish...
I have duly received the Copy of "Swallow Barn" with which you favoured me. The condition of my eyes, and the inroads on my general health, make it so uncertain when I shall be able to avail myself of the pleasure which the 2 volumes promise, that I take the liberty of tendering you my thanks, in advance: well assured by the reputation of the work; and by what I have seen from the same pen...
Your favor of February 8th. was duly received and I regret that it has not been sooner acknowledged. But such was and has since been the decrepit state of my health, that I have been obliged to avoid as much as possible the use of the pen. Being at present partially relieved from a supervening malady under which I have for a considerable time been particularly suffering I avail myself of the...
A large number of the Democratic Republicans of this County, intend giving a public dinner to the Honble Jno. M. Patton their faithful and distinguished Representative, on the 23rd Instant at Madison Cthouse, as a testimonial of their high sense of his talents and approbation of his course during the late eventful Session of Congress. In their name we respectfully solicit the pleasure of your...
Your letter of July 14. fellow Citizens & friends", came duly to hand; but I was at the time and have been since suffering under a new inroad on my health, which has obliged me to suspend as much as possible the attention due to Correspondents. Having at present a partial relief, perhaps a short one, I avail myself of it, to assure you that the very kind interest, the Society takes in my...
I am glad to learn from your letter of the 26th. Inst. that your troublesome complaint is, at the least, mitigated I do not think it would be advisable, in any other manner, than by the Sulphur Water, to attempt to remove the itching, as I should be afraid, that by any sudden repercussion of the irritation it might be transferred to organs of greater consequence. The internal use of the...
The copy of your intended Speech on the "Removal of the Deposits" was received in the due time. But such was and has since been the deterioration of my health, that I could not give it a proper perusal. Being at present somewhat relieved from the supervening malady under which I have been more particularly suffering, I avail myself of this circumstance to thank you for your polite attention. I...
At the suggestion of my friend Mr John Barney, I have taken the liberty to send you a copy of Swallow Barn which will reach you with this letter. In this attempt to make a few pictures of the characteristic scenery of the low country, you may perhaps find some agreeable recollections awakened, and derive an hour’s amusement from that source. I shall feel happy in the belief that I have, even...
I have delayed reporting the state of my health or rather of my malady, continually hoping that a few days wd. permit me to say, that I had been entirely freed from my eruptive complaint. But I am still obliged to state that altho’ the surface of my body & limbs are with trifling exceptions here & there, become clean & smooth, the continuance of the itching seems to give notice that there is a...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr Bonnycastle & encloses the requested introduction to Genl. McComb. Not being personally acquainted with Genl. Gratiot he has left the opportunity of communicating with him to the interposition of Genl. McComb. FC (DLC) .
Professor Bonnycastle is desirous of obtaining your opinion on an improvement he has thought of in canals and on some points connected with our school of Civil engineering. Being a stranger to you he has asked from me a line of introduction I give it with pleasure as due to his personal merits as well as to his high scientific reputation. I offer no apology therefore for the liberty I take...
An improvement in canals having presented itself to me I was desirous of asking the opinion of either Genl Macomb, or Genl Gratiot upon that subject, as well as upon some points connected with our School of Civil Engineering. Expressing to Mr Cabell my reluctance to intrude myself on these Gentlemen, he suggested that it would not be improper to ask the favor of a letter from you. I confess...
I have received Sir your letter of the 10th. Inst. and would gladly furnish any information favourable to a just claim for Public service, but I have no recollection of the circumstance you mention or of any others which could avail yours. There must indeed be a mistake in relation to the person on whom you called with communications from Govr. Jefferson—durring the period you refer to I was...
I have recd. your letter of the 13th. Inst. I can give you no information relating to the family of President Finley except in the case of his son named (I believe) Ebenezar he was a student in Princetown College whilst I was—It is true as stated to you that he had a defect in his mouth—there was such a natural cohesion of his lips that his mouth could never be enlarged beyond a capacity to...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Chapman and has received the excellent Engravings which he kindly forwarded on the 9th. and assures him that Mrs Madison is highly pleased with the likeness as well as the execution of the Engraver, and desires to be included in this offer of acknowledgments. RC (MiU-C) .
The Jefferson democratic Society of the City & County of Philadelphia, at a late Stated meeting, directed the undersigned, their Comme. of Correspondence to inform you of the great concern of the members, during your late indisposition, & their unfeigned pleasure at your recovery. It is not in the spirit of adulation—nor in the hope of reward, nor is it because you have been President of this...
I have long Anxiously sought information relative to the family of the Revd Samuil Findley President of Princetown Collidge and who diparted this life in 1766 his family At that time living in Princetown. I recently saw a publication in A News paper relative to the Revd. Nathan Perkins which stated that he Graduated at Princetown in 1769. I immediately wrote him And yesterday received his...
I am a free man of color, by the name of William Dailey, and respectfully crave permission to address you on a subject deeply interesting to myself. I was in the public service in the War of the Revolution—was charged with dispatches by Governor Jefferson to the Lieutenants of the several Counties of Virginia, and some of those of North Carolina, at the time the enemy made a descent &...