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J. M. thanks Mr. Kane for his friendly communication of the 28th. March. Although in his present condition he cannot enter into an examination of the topics involved in the pamphlet, they suggest their own importance, and will doubtless receive from others the attention they deserve. He begs Mr. Kane to be assured of his respect and good wishes. FC (DLC) .
I hardly know how sufficiently to express the very great delight and instruction I derived from the days your hospitality permitted me to spend under your roof. They will ever be remembered as among the happiest of my life. Mr Van Buren has this moment put into my hands the first volume of Armstrong’s work on the late war. I remember you expressed a curiosity to see it, & I beg leave to...
J. Madison with his respects to Govr. Cass, offers him many thanks for the copy of his late discourse before the American Historical Society at Washington. He has read it with great pleasure, the greater, from its favorable bearing on the literary reputation of our Country—"If History be Philosophy teaching by example," it will itself be instructed by the Philosophy of such discourses. FC (DLC) .
I am about to trouble you in a matter of delicacy and of interest. I do so, not without great reluctance: indeed nothing could impel me to it, but what I consider an imperious duty to a friend, and to truth. Mr. Smith, the competitor of Mr. Slaughter, in the Senatorial Canvass, asserted on thursday last, at a publick meeting, in the upper part of this county, as a gentleman of intelligence and...
Having made a partial collection of the autographs of distinguished individuals, the undersigned would feel extremely gratified, if he could add yours to the number. Also, if it would not be asking too great a favor, the undersigned would feel exceedingly happy, if you would at the same time enclose the autographs of Jay and Hamilton , or whatever other distinguished contemporary and friend of...
I have received, with your letter of the 15th. inst: a copy of your "Election Sermon on the 6th of Jany.," and thank you for the pleasure afforded by the able, and instructive, lessons which it so impressively adapted to the occasion. I cannot conceal from myself that your letter has indulged a partiality, which greatly overrates my public services: I may say nevertheless, that I am among...
The enclosed letter from Col: Ch: Todd was recd. to day. I have an imperfect recollection of the conversation as well as of the subject alluded to. I have however of certain remarks made by you at the time, & repeated frequently since, respecting Genl. Armstrong’s conduct on recieving the resignation of Gen’l Harrison, and as I have an impression on my mind that you noted the circumstances at...
Professor Palfrey of Harvard College being desirous of paying his respects to you on his return to Boston from Louisiana, I take great pleasure in introducing him to your personal acquaintance—His character is no doubt already well known to you. I beg leave to present my respects to Mrs. Madison & to subscribe myself your respectful & obed. Servt. RC (DLC) .
J. Madison, with his best respects to Mr. Leigh, thanks him for the Copy of his interesting letter of March 2d. to the General Assembly; interesting both from the importance of its subject, and the ability with which it is treated. FC (DLC) .
The precise obligation imposed on a representative, by instructions of his constituents, still divides the opinions, of distinguished statesmen. This is the case in Great Britain, where such topics have been most discussed. It is also now the case, more or less < >d was so, at the first Congress under the present Constitution, as appears from the Register of Debates, imperfectly as they were...
I do myself the honour of sending you a pamphlet explanatory of the proceedings of the late commission under the treaty with France, of which I have printed a few copies for distribution. I have no hope that your leisure will permit you to examine it; but I offer it to your acceptance as a testimonial of the profound respect with which I am, Your very obedient and faithful servant, RC (DLC) .
Front March 27 1836. Forwarded for the Lawrville Lyceum at the request in its name, of a Book from my library, and as a token of the respect I feel for an Institute patronizing youthful talent Back to the youth of a free country < >, on a subject particularly adap< > Fragment (NjMoHP) .
I have received Sir, your letter of the 18. of Feby., and in compliance with its request, have addressed to Mr. Denny a Volume, for the LawrenceVille Lyceum. Accept my respects and good wishes. RC (University of Chicago Library); FC (DLC) .
J. M. presents his respects to Mr Denny, and as desired by Mr. V. David commits to his care a Book for Lawrenceville Lyceum. FC (DLC) ; RC (?) owned in November 1970 by Kenneth W. Rendell, Inc., 62 Bristol Road, Somerville, Massachusetts
I have received your letter of the lst. and would gladly furnish the information you wish, but I have no recollection myself, nor can I learn, from those who have long lived on the spot that your Father was ever employed by me in digging a well, nor do I believe there was any even dug within his period. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. Sir, your letter of the 18th. Having declined such interpositions as you request of me, which would have been required even by the numerous applications for them, I can only tender you my respects & good wishes with the expression of my confidence that the recommendation of your highly respectable friends on the spot, who are personally acquainted with you will have more weight in...
I have recd. your letter of the 17th. The best answer I can give, will be found in the enclosed paper containing the last proceedings of the Historical Society in this State. With respect, FC and enclosure (PHi) . Enclosure is William Zollickoffer to Socrates Maupin, 27 Aug. 1837, re proceedings of Virginia Historical Society.
You expressed a wish (page -- vol. III,) to obtain information in relation to the history of the emancipated people of color in Prince Edward; I presume those emancipated by the late Richard Randolph more especially. More than twenty-five years ago, I think, they were liberated, at which time they numbered about one hundred, and were settled upon small parcels of land, of perhaps 10 to...
I have recd. Sir your letter of the 9th. and am sorry that I cannot give you the information it requests; nor can I refer to the source from which it may be most conveniently & successfully sought. I do not possess a Copy of the printed Correspondence between Mr. B* & myself on the subject of his proposed "Codification for the U. S." nor even the original manuscript of my part of it for which...
As a Stranger, I ought not, by the laws of courtesy, to intrude myself on your notice. But in offering for your acceptance a copy of a Discourse delivered before the Government of this State on the day of Annual Election last past, I cherish the hope that you will permit me to accompany it, with an expression of my grateful admiration of the illustrious services, which you have rendered to our...
I desired very much to have had the pleasure of paying my respects to yourself & Mrs. Madison on my way to Washington, but the necessity of my being there with as little delay as possible & the almost impassable state of the roads, (which has compelled me to leave Mrs. Rives behind, to follow me when she can), have deprived me of that satisfaction. It has given me great pleasure to learn that...
Will you do me the favour of informing me whether or not the correspondence between yourself & my illustrious fellow country man Jeremy Bentham on the codification of American laws was ever published. If so when, where, and under what title it was given to the world. An answer will oblige. Your Excellency’s hle Sert. RC (DLC) .
I did not recieve until last evening your letter of the 22d. Feby. communicating the late proceedings of the "American Historical Society of Military & Naval Events", and "asking leave to present my name as an honorary Member". I have too much respect for the object of the society, and for the names composing it, to be insensible to the honor of an association of mine, with them. I must not...
While I feel that, as an utter stranger, I am taking a very great liberty with you when I address you upon a subject in which you cannot be supposed to feel the smallest interest yet am I assured that if it be in your power to serve me you will take pleasure in doing it. The object of this is to learn from you if you can give me any information respecting an individual who was employed by you...
J. Madison with his thanks to Mr Van Buren for the Copy of the Presidents Message of the 22d. reciprocates his congratulations on the event, which terminates the difficulties with France. It is a happy denouement of an embarrassing controversy, apparently working itself into a knot, for which the sword alone might be a match. The following ommitted [None perhaps, rejoice on this occasion, more...
I have recd. Sir your letter of the 16. inst. requesting such information as I might be able to give pertaining to a Biography of your father in Law the late Chief Justice Ellsworth. My acquaintance with him was limited to the periods of our cotemporary services in public life, and to the occasional intercourse, incident to it. As we happened to be thrown but little into the familiar...
J. M. with his respects to Professor Rogers, returns many thanks for the Copy of his Report on the "Geological Reconnaissance of the State of Virginia." Unskilled as he is in the subject; he cannot but regard the Report as an able & instructive commencement of a task, which if duly prosecuted under the auspices it merits, cannot fail to amplify greatly the resources of the state, & to afford...
J. Madison with friendly salutations to Mr Southard thanks him for the copy of his speech on the 25th of Jany. In his present condition he can read but little. He has however borrowed from other claims on his attention, the time required for a perusal of the Speech. Whether regarded as a test of debating powers, or as a material for the political history of our Country, it is a Document, that...
James Madison having reason to believe, that in the Autograph lately furnished to Mr. Freeman, there was a lapsus of attention, in the reference to the year of his age, which instead of 84th. ought to have been 85th. which will soon be completed from the date of his birth in March 1751. Mr. Freeman will be so good as to alter the figure 4 into 5, after which this note may be destroyed. RC...
Your letter introducing the Earl of Selkirk was duly delivered and I soon found that his intelligence, and social merits—justified the reception asked for him. Mrs. Madison and myself cannot forego the occasion to thank you for the kind & friendly terms in which you express your sentiments towards us, & to assure you that there are affectionate reminiscences between the two families which will...
I beg leave to refer you to the foregoing statement of the organization of our Society, and of its objects; and also, respectfully to ask leave to present your name, at our first quarterly meeting, (on the first Monday in March,) as an Honorary Member. Yours, &c. RC and enclosures (DLC) . Enclosures are printed documents from the American Historical Society of Military and Naval Events.
I have received fellow Citizens, your letter inviting me to a public dinner, at Cincinnatti, on the 4th. of March, to celebrate the expiration on the preceding day, of the Charter of the U. S. Bank; and requesting from me, if unable to attend, an appropriate sentiment to be given in my name, by the Company. Retaining as I do, my convict<ion> heretofore officially, and otherwise expressed, that...
I have recd. your letter of the 6th. instant. The number relating to my religion addressed to me from diversified quarters, led me long ago to adopt the general rule of declining correspondences on the subject, the rule itself furnishing a convenient answer. I will not however withhold the expression of my sensibility to the friendly interest you take in my welfare here and hereafter; and your...
In attempting to write the Life of my Father in law, the late Chief Justice Ellsworth, I am under the necessity of resorting for materials to the small remnant yet with us, of that venerable band of Patriots and Statesmen who were colabourers with him in the organization of our Government—For that purpose I take the liberty to address you at this time—And were it not for the great distance...
In acknoledging the receipt of your letter of January 30. and thanking you for your kind wishes, which are sincerely returned, I comply with your request of an autographic line. Being written near the close of my 84th. year, with fingers crippled by Rheumatism, my name is added, as familarly written previous to the causes of the change. RC (owned by H. Spencer Glidden, Andover, Mass.); draft...
J. Madison has duly received the Copy of the President’s Message of the 8th. inst., enclosed by Mr. Van Buren and respectfully thanks him for the interesting communication. FC (DLC) .
Private I have just received your letter of Feby. 4th. The petition to Congress was returned with my signature two days ago. I think the postponement of the public invitation of plans for the Monument was very proper for the reasons you give. I doubt the expediency of the proposed application to the Legislature of Virginia without more knowledge than I have of its dispositions on the subject...
I have received your letter of the 3d. Instant, enclosing a copy of your speech on the right of petition &c; which certainly contains very able and interesting views of the subject. I do not wonder at your difficulty in understanding, the import, of the passage cited from my speech in the first Congress, under the present Constitution, being myself at a loss, for its precise meaning, obscured...
I feel extremely obliged to you for the polite manner in which you have been pleased to notice my letter. I will further add I was induced to address you on the subject as the President of the society, not thinking at the moment I was addressing one of the framers of the Constitution, although a moments reflection would have told me that was the case, which makes your silence on the subject...
Permit a friend & relative, though a stranger, to address you upon a subject deeply interesting to every child of Adam. Before entering upon it, I would remark as a part of my apology that I am by profession a minister of the Gospel of the Presbyterian Church, & a little allied to your family. My mother is a sister to Col. James Madison of Prince Edward now in the legislature, with whom I...
I am requested by the Board of Managers of the Washington National Monument Society to ask the favor of your signature, as President of the Society, to the accompanying memorial to the General Assembly of Virginia, if you should approve it; and to give it such aid as in your judgment may be proper, and as it may be convenient for you to give. Permit me, Sir, to congratulate myself upon the...
I had the honor, yesterday, to receive your favor of the 31st. ulto. enclosing a letter from Mr. McCleland of Balto. communicating his ideas respecting the Washington Monument, and shall lay it before the Board of Managers. At the meeting of the Board on the 3d. instant, a resolution was proposed to advertise for plans & estimates; but as we cannot yet form a correct idea of the amount of the...
I beg leave to present to you the accompanying speech, in which I have endeavored to maintain the right of petition, as it is recognised in the Constitution. It is not probable that I should have troubled the House with my views on the subject, but for my knowledge of the debates of 1790 in reference to a very similar occasion, and the reliance I placed on the opinion which you then expressed,...
The friends of free principles in the first Congressional district of Ohio in manifestation of their Joy for the emanicipation of their country from the thraldom of the United States Bank the charter of which expires on the 3d. March next have resolved to celebrate the following as the first day of the second great era of American Independance—And as well in high admiration of your Character...
Your long intimacy with Mr. Jefferson, your accordance with him in the principles of civil government, your cordial co-operation in carrying those principles into effect, and lastly, the kindness with which you have answered my inquiries and guided my researches, make it peculiarly proper that I should address to you the following pages. In submitting to you the biography of that friend of...
a paper prepared by Mr. Madison a short time before his death, in which he re-examined the question of the power to establish a Bank—written in consequence of its having been represented, that his signature of the Bank bill proceeded from a change of opinion on his part, of the constitutional power of Congress on that subject— Ms (fragment) (ViU) .
I enclose a letter from Mr. McCleland, of whom I have no knowledge, containing a plan for the Washington Monument. I have merely informed him that I should do so—with an intimation to address to you his further communications on the subject. It has I believe been the practice abroad in such cases to invite a competition from men of genius and taste. With my respects and cordial salutations FC...
I have received Sir your letter of Jany 23d. containing a plan for the proposed Washington Monument. When my appointment as President of the Society was made known to me, I intimated that my acceptance of it was merely as an evidence of the interest I felt in the object, and that in my present condition the appointment could be but honorary. This being every day more and more the case I shall...
I have received the copy of your address to the two branches of the Legislature, which I have read with much pleasure. It is what I should have taken for certain it would be, a very able document, and of a character appropriate to the occasion. I am not sure however, that I ought to congratulate you on the event, which led to the address, since it withdraws your services from a wider theatre,...
I return with thanks the papers you kindly favored me with an opportunity of perusing. They are not without interest tho’ superseded by the mass of information now before the public. I am sorry to find from this, that so much uncertainty still clouds the issue of the controversy with France. Should it fail of an amicable adjustment by the parties themselves, it is quite possible that Great...