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Results 211-240 of 183,203 sorted by date (ascending)
MS Minute Book, Union Fire Company: Library Company of Philadelphia The Union Fire Company’s Articles of Agreement of January 31, 1743, are substantially the same as those of 1736 (see above, pp. 150–3), and will not be printed here in full. There are, however, three noteworthy differences. Article I increased the required equipment for each member from two leather buckets and four linen bags...
Draft: American Philosophical Society This document obviously belongs to the period of Franklin’s Philadelphia postmastership, 1737–53. The date 1743 is tentatively ascribed on the basis of a marginal note that the John , Captain Mesnard, for New York arrived at Deal on February 10. Stephen Mesnard was captain of the Britannia sailing between New York and England in 1740–41, and of the...
Broadside: Yale University Library A proposal Franklin drafted in 1743 to found an academy in Philadelphia, he wrote in his autobiography, came to nothing and was laid aside. “I succeeded better the next Year, 1744, in proposing and establishing a Philosophical Society.” Franklin did take a leading part in founding this Society, but the implications that it was his idea and that the Society...
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , June 23 and 30, 1743. The first of these pieces, to which Smyth gave the title “Shavers and Trimmers” when he reprinted both ( Writings , ii , 232–6), appeared in the Gazette , June 23, 1743. It was inspired by a barber’s advertising the week before that he intended to give up shaving and trimming to confine himself to wigmaking. The essay is a...
ALS : Columbia University Library Mr. Read has communicated to me part of a Letter from you, recommending a young Man whom you would be glad to see in better Business than that of a Journeyman Printer. I have already three Printing-Houses in three different Colonies, and purpose to set up a fourth if I can meet with a proper Person to manage it, having all Materials ready for that purpose. If...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I took your Admonition very kindly, and was far from being offended at you for it. If I say any thing about it to you, ’tis only to rectify some wrong Opinions you seem to have entertain’d of me, and that I do only because they give you some Uneasiness, which I am unwilling to be the Occasion of. You express yourself as if you thought I was against...
Draft: New-York Historical Society Ever since I had the Pleasure of a Conversation with you tho very short by our accedental Meeting on the Road I have been very desirous to engage you in a Correspondence. You was pleas’d to take some notice of a Method of Printing which I mentioned to you at that time and to think it practicable. I have no further concern for it than as it may be usefull to...
ALS : New-York Historical Society; also transcript: Library of Congress I received the Favour of yours, with the Proposal for a new Method of Printing, which I am much pleased with: and since you express some Confidence in my Opinion, I shall consider it very attentively and particularly, and in a Post or two send you some Observations on every Article. My long Absence from home in the Summer,...
AD : American Philosophical Society Mr Benjamin Franklin to Alexr Annand Dr To James and William Franklins Schooling from Decr 12th 1738 [to] Decr 1739 £6 00 0 To Wms Do from Decr 12th 1739 to Decr 1743 12 00 0 To firing £1 2 s. 01 02 0 To Ovids Epistles 3 s. 00
MS not found; reprinted from Jared Sparks, ed., A Collection of the Familiar Letters and Miscellaneous Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Boston, 1833), p. 10. If you still continue your inclination to send Benny, you may do it by the first vessel to New York. Write a line by him, directed to Mr. James Parker, Printer, on Hunter’s Key, New York. I am confident he will be kindly used there, and I...
221Poor Richard, 1744 (Franklin Papers)
Poor Richard, 1744. An Almanack For the Year of Christ 1744 ,... By Richard Saunders, Philom. Philadelphia: Printed and sold by B. Franklin. (Yale University Library) This is the Twelfth Year that I have in this Way laboured for the Benefit—of Whom?—of the Publick, if you’ll be so good-natured as to believe it; if not, e’en take the naked Truth, ’twas for the Benefit of my own dear self; not...
Printed in A Pocket Almanack For the Year 1744. Fitted to the Use of Pennsylvania, and the neighbouring Provinces .... By R. Saunders, Phil. Philadelphia: Printed and sold by B. Franklin. (Yale University Library) The 1741 issue of A Pocket Almanack had proved so successful that Franklin continued for some years to publish it. Only about two inches by four in size, it sometimes appeared in red...
223Extracts from the Gazette, 1744 (Franklin Papers)
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , January 3 to December 25, 1744. Wednesday last a Fire broke out in the Roof of a House in Second Street near the Church, but there being sufficient Help at hand, it was presently extinguished. Axes were observ’d to be of great Use; for when Holes were made in the Shingling, the Water from Engines and Buckets readily enter’d, and did ten times the Service...
Transcript: Harvard College Library (Sparks); another transcript: American Philosophical Society I have this day read over my version of Cicero’s Cato Major in thy Print, with my Notes on it, and cannot but applaud thy care but wish thou hadst not begun in pa: 49 with Greek Letter, since thou hadst not enough of the same character to go on with it, for to this alone I must impute the failure....
M.T. Cicero’s Cato Major, or His Discourse of Old-Age: With Explanatory Notes. Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by B. Franklin, MDCCXLIV . (Yale University Library) Franklin’s edition of James Logan’s translation of Cicero’s Cato Major is one of the best known issues of his press, and many have considered it also the handsomest. “I translated that piece,” Logan told a friend, “in the Winter of...
ALS : New-York Historical Society; also transcript: Library of Congress Happening to be in this City about some particular Affairs, I have the Pleasure of receiving yours of the 28th past, here. And can now acquaint you, that the Society, as far as relates to Philadelphia, is actually formed, and has had several Meetings to mutual Satisfaction; assoon as I get home, I shall send you a short...
Copy: Land Office, Department of Internal Affairs, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Know all Men by these Presents, That We Benjamin Franklin Deputy-Postmaster of the City of Philada. in the Province of Pennsilvania, and Robert Grace of the same Place Merchant are Held and firmly Bound unto the Honourable Elliott Benger, Esqr; Sole Deputy-Postmaster General of all his Majesty’s Dominions in...
ALS : Yale University Library; also duplicate: University of Pennsylvania Library I receiv’d your Favour per Mr. Hall, who arriv’d here about two Weeks since, and from the short Acquaintance I have had with him, I am persuaded he will answer perfectly the Character you had given of him. I make no doubt but his Voyage, tho’ it has been expensive, will prove advantageous to him: I have already...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library The above is a Copy of my last (via Corke). This encloses Bills for Twenty Pounds Thirteen Shillings Sterling, for which when receiv’d please to give my Account Credit, and send me by the first Ship a Fount of about 300 lb. weight of good new English Letter, which I shall want to compleat a little Printing house for our common Friend Mr. Hall. I send...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I apprehend I am too busy in prescribing, and meddling in the Dr’s Sphere, when any of you complain of Ails in your Letters: But as I always employ a Physician my self when any Disorder arises in my Family and submit implicitly to his Orders in every Thing, so I hope you consider my Advice, when I give any, only as a Mark of my good Will, and put no more of...
ALS : Yale University Library Dr. Mitchel, a Gentleman from Virginia, came to Town this Morning with Mr. Bertram, and we have been together all Day, which has hindred my Writing to you as I intended. We are to go to Mr. Logan’s tomorrow, when I shall have an Opportunity of knowing his Sentiments of your Piece on Fluxions. I am Sir Your most humble Servant Addressed: To  The Honbl Cadwalr...
Draft: Yale University Library I have Yours of the 13th and am glad to find by it that you have an opportunity of conversing with a Gentleman who I believe is both willing and Capable of promoting your Philosophical Design. You’l perceive by what you receive on these Sheets that I have open’d to my self a large Prospect either into Nature or into Fairyland and I have in my Imaginations made...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wrote to you per Capt. Evans, and enclos’d you Bills for £20.13.0 Sterlg. of which I now send you the Seconds. I sent you also a Box containing 300 Books I had printed, and by this Ship I send you 200 Copies of our late Indian Treaty which I hope will come to hand and sell with you. I will take Books of you in Exchange for as much of them as you can [get]...
ALS : New-York Historical Society I communicated your Piece on Fluxions to Mr. Logan, and being at his House a few Days after, he told me, he had read it cursorily, that he thought you had not fully hit the Matter, and ( I think ) that Berkley’s Objections were well founded: but said he would read it over more attentively. Since that, he tells me there are several Mistakes in it, two of which...
ALS : Chicago Historical Society I have wrote to you by several Opportunities to acknowledge the Receipt of yours per Mr. Hall with the Things you sent me. I have also remitted you Bills for £20.13.0. Sterl. of which you have the fourths enclos’d. I desired you to send me a Fount of about 300 wt. English and the best Newspapers and Pamphlets constantly. I hope some of my Letters have come to...
An Account Of the New Invented Pennsylvanian Fire-Places: ... Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by B. Franklin. 1744. (Yale University Library) According to his autobiography, Franklin invented the Pennsylvania fireplace in 1742, but the winter of 1739–40 is a more likely date. Writing of it in the summer or fall of 1744, he says that he and his family and friends have enjoyed its warmth “for...
Draft: New-York Historical Society The season of the year advancing in which our Correspondence from this place with New York becomes more uncertain and my eldest son going now to New York where he proposes to stay 8 or 10 days I hope you’l excuse my interrupting you in your Business which I know allows you little time for trifles or amusements. In your last you gave me hopes that you would...
238Poor Richard, 1745 (Franklin Papers)
Poor Richard, 1745. An Almanack For the Year of Christ 1745 , … By Richard Saunders, Philom. Philadelphia: Printed and sold by B. Franklin. (American Antiquarian Society) For the Benefit of the Publick, and my own Profit, I have performed this my thirteenth annual Labour, which I hope will be as acceptable as the former. The rising and setting of the Planets, and their Conjunctions with the...
Draft: American Philosophical Society This MS in BF ’s autograph was dated “ circa 1745” in I. Minis Hays, Calendar of the Papers of Benjamin Franklin (Phila., 1908), III , 435. Van Doren accepted this in Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiographical Writings (N.Y., 1945), p. 48. There is no reason for changing it except, perhaps, that BF has suggested alternative words in pencil, which he used more...
240Extracts from the Gazette, 1745 (Franklin Papers)
Printed in The Pennsylvania Gazette , January 1 to December 31, 1745. [ Advertisement ] Lost on Friday, the 21st of December, 1744, betwixt Frankfort and Philadelphia, a Fowling-Piece, mounted with Brass, Dutch Make, a black Barrel, with a pretty wide Bore. Whoever has found it, and will return it to the Printer hereof, shall be sufficiently rewarded. [January 1] After a long Dearth of News,...