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Results 2201-2250 of 183,496 sorted by date (ascending)
Extract: Huntington Library; Public Record Office, London The circular Letter You show’d me the Draft of, explaining the Particulars of what Assistance was required and expected from the Colonies to the King’s Forces, has not been communicated to the Assembly; Nevertheless, I have now the Pleasure to tell You, that an Act yesterday passed the House, and I believe will receive the Governor’s...
I. Reprinted from Minutes of the Provincial Council of Pennsylvania , VII (Harrisburg, 1851), 249 (cited as Pa. Col. Recs .). II. Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1755–1756 (Philadelphia, 1756), pp. 145–6. III . Pa. Col. Recs ., VII , 250. IV. Votes , 1755–56, pp. 147–9; Pa. Col. Recs .,
Your Letter of the 8th I recd last Night—I am affraid the Draughts from Prince William, Culpeper & Fairfax are not made agreeable to expectation, as I hear many of the Young Men have made their Escape & do not appear at the Musters. Sir, I mention’d in my Letter of the [1]9th Ulto to enlist Servants agreeable to the Act of Parliament; that of Act of Parliamt I wrote from Yr Letter to me, I...
Your Favour of the 29th Augt did not come to my Hands till yesterday: as I did not see the Messenger who brought it, who I understood call’d at my Building on his Way to Fredericksburg, I shall keep this, a Day or two, to see if he will call for an Answer as he returns from thence; if he does not, I shall send it to Mount Vernon, & beg the favr of Yr Brother to convey it by the first Safe Hand...
2205Orders, 14–22 September 1756 (Washington Papers)
George Field, Thomas Nevill, Peter Simmonds, and Thomas Ope, recruited by Captain Mercer, were reviewed, and passed. The men to parade to-morrow morning at beating the long roll, with their arms and ammunition clean and in good order, and to be marched by the Sergeants of the respective companies to the Fort, there to remain until prayers are over. An orderly Drummer to remain at the...
I had your favour at Noon, before Which the Express had set out for Mount Vernon, after giving him half a Dollar for Expences. The uneasiness you Lye under from the Vain Babling of Worthless, Malicious, Envious Sycophants, give me much Concern—Conscious of a Due & Honorable Discharge of Your Duty, (as undoubtedly you Must be) Their Censure, & Scurrility loses it’s force & Venom by Your Silent...
Yours to Mr Kirkpatrick I have just perus’d, of my truth yo. may depend on, & that I wish my Capacity was equal to my inclination of advising you for the best. Know Sir, that ev’ry Gentn in an exalted Station raises envy, & ev’ry person takes the Liberty of judging, or rather determining (witht judging) from Appearances, (or information) without weighing circumstances, or the proper causes, on...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1755–1756 (Philadelphia, 1756), pp. 154–60. Though the chief executive officer in colonial Pennsylvania was commonly called governor and is so designated in these volumes, he was in fact a deputy of the Proprietors in England who were themselves legally the governors of the province. He was obliged by law and by personal bond...
Duplicate: Pierpont Morgan Library I enclose three Bills, viz. A second for £50 Sterling, drawn by Thos. Saul on Wm. Baker. A first — £20 — — Mary Steevens—Alexr. Grant. A first — £30 — — Philip Ludwell Wm. Bowden. When paid, please to Credit my Account with them. I am Yours most affectionately P.S. We agree perfectly well with the Governor, but are very angry with the Proprietors and the...
2210Orders, 23 September 1756 (Washington Papers)
Ensign Price to march the men under his command to-morrow morning, to their respective cantonments. The Quarter-master to provide a lock & key for the Town-house, and secure all the windows above and below with hides; and to employ the Drummers, and those of the Sentry now on guard, are likewise to assist to clean out the house. LB , DLC:GW . See the source line note, Orders, 9–13 Sept. 1756 ....
Under your kind indulgence I came to this place a few days ago, expecting to meet the Executors of my deceased Brother; in order to make a final settlement of his affairs: I was disappointed tho’ in this design, by the Assembly having called away the principal persons concerned; which I was unacquainted with until Jenkins’s return, near about the same time that I got down. I shall remark, in...
John informs me that you told him Miss Nancy West was to be at your House in a day or two; and that you woud, if I sent my Linnen over, give it to Miss Nancy to make: I shall readily embrace the oppertunity of doing this, thô I am at the same time, sorry to give you the trouble of directing about the making. I have sent a piece of Irish Linnen, a piece of Cambrick, and a Shirt to measure by....
2213Orders, 24–28 September 1756 (Washington Papers)
A Sergeant and twelve men, volunteers, to parade immediately, and go 5 or 6 miles up the new road, and return by the old road. After Orders. The eldest Subaltern & 25 men volunteers to march out to morrow morning at revilé beating, up the new road to Hogcreek, and to call at Paris’s Fort for a Guide to shew the tracts and bushes which were seen and cut down this evening by report, and to...
MS not found; reprinted from William S. Perry, ed., Papers Relating to the History of the Church in Pennsylvania, A.D. 1680–1778 (Privately printed, 1871), pp. 560–2. To the Right Honourable and worthy Members of the Society for promoting religious Knowledge and the English Language among the German Emigrants in Pennsylvania, &c. Most Worthy Lords and Gentlemen We have been duly honoured with...
Original not found; facsimile of printed form with MS insertions in blanks: Torrington Library, Torrington, Conn. In Assembly   Septr. 24  175  6 This is to certify, that   Benjamin Franklin  has attended as a Member of Assembly for the   Ci  ty of  Philadelphia.  108  Days, at Six Shillings per Diem , for which there is due to him the Sum of   Thirty two Pounds, Eight Shillings
DS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania Pay to Benjamin Franklin, or Order, the Sum of Two hundred and Ten Pounds, Thirteen Shillings and Ninepence Halfpenny; being the Ballance of his Account for Expences paid by him for Establishing a Post between Winchester and Philadelphia in Pursuance of a Resolve of the House; and for Postage of Letters to the Army under the late General Braddock. £210 13...
I arrived here last night, and find things in the peaceable state I left them on this Quarter; and therefore set out tomorrow for Augusta. As Mr Walker has declined, it is absolutely necessary to have a Commissary immediately appointed, who should have express orders where, and for what number of men, to lay in Provisions; and should be furnished with cash before he sets out, as every thing...
I arrived here last night, and observe your several letters concerning your present situation; and must acknowledge I have the greatest apprehensions of your danger: but as I have frequently expressed them to the Governor, and he has returned me no satisfactory answer—and know the determination of the Assembly & Committee is against improving that Fort: I can not give any orders as to your...
2219Orders, 29–30 September 1756 (Washington Papers)
LB , DLC:GW . GW left Winchester for Augusta County on 29 Sept. 1756 and did not return until 22 October. As was the case during his absence in September, the orders issued at Winchester and entered in GW’s letter book until 10 Oct. were given presumably by the aide-de-camp George Mercer. Mercer left Winchester on 10 Oct. to go to Williamsburg, and no further orders appear in GW’s letter book...
Last Night I recd a Letter dated the 23d from Alexaa not sign’d, but by its purport I believe it from You—Jenkins’s delay prevents laying any Thing before the Assembly as they were prorogued the Morning he arriv’d —I am of Opinion You may enforce the Articles of War the same as in the British Establishmt that with tenderness as the Exigency of Affairs may require; & tho’ no Crimes but Mutiny &...
Tho’ I acknowledge that one ought never to be asham’d to speak the truth; yet I find my self much inclin’d to it, when I’m about to tell you that I have two of your very kind and ingenious Letters by me unanswer’d. I assure you sir, that my neglect arises not from any want of esteem for my Friend, but (to tell another ungratefull truth) from downright dullness; I must wait with patience for...
2222Orders, 1–9 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
The men to parade to-morrow morning as usual, for Divine Service. Lieutenant Baker with his Detachment to march at the Revilé beating to-morrow morning. A Return to be made out of the Virginia Regiment, with every Officer, appointment, and pay, or any other allowances they may have; with the number of men in each company. As it is to be transmitted to The Right Honble the Earl of Loudon; it is...
DS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania The last orders for payments under the £60,000 act of Nov. 27, 1755, were signed by the provincial commissioners July 22, before Franklin’s return from New York. They were unable to issue any more orders until early October, when funds provided by the £30,000 act of September 21 became available. The thirty-eight orders signed between October 4 and...
The Coppy of The Officers (of the Virginia Regimt) Letter. To Lieut. Collo. Adam Stephen Commandr at Fort Cumberland dated October the 6 1756. Sir. To our no small Astonishment We (last night) perus’d a Paper in the Virga Gazette intitled the Centinel No: X. The Contents of Which are so Scandalous and altogether so Unjust, that We think it a Duty incumbent on Us, Who have the least Regard for...
A Return of the Virginia Regiment whereof George Washington Esqr. Commander of all the Virginia Forces is Colonel Winchester October 9th 1756. Field officers and Captains Lieutenants Ensigns Staff officers non Commissioned officers Effective Rank and File Serjeants Drummers Fit for Duty Sick Command Total George Washington Colonel John Mcneil Capt. Lieutenant James Roy James Livingston...
2226Orders, 10 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
LB , DLC:GW .
2227Memorandum, 10 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
N.B. This day Captain Mercer set out for Williamsburgh. Colonel Washington has now been on his journey to Augusta &c. since the 29th September. LB , DLC:GW . Mercer was going down to the general court to give evidence in the case against the counterfeiter James Knap and to testify in James Lemen’s trial. See GW to Dinwiddie, 4 Aug. 1756, n.23 , and Orders, 22, 23 Aug. 1756 .
This day, within five miles of the Carolina line, as I was proceeding to the southermost Fort in Halifax; I met Major Lewis on his return from the Cherokees, with seven men, and three women only of that nation. The causes of this unhappy disappointment, I have desired him to communicate, that your Honor may take measures accordingly. This account is sent by Express, to give the earliest...
I came down here the first of the Court, to consult yr friends on that unlucky 10th Centinel the author of which I think has reason to keep his name concealed for being so general in his reflections on a sett of Gentlemen who deserves better treatment at his hands &c. Was not the paper to go further than our own Colony I am sensible it wou’d not be worth your while giving yr self the lest...
In my last you remember I desired your sincere Opinion of the new Resolution I had taken, but as you have not yet been so kind as to send it, I must beg your patience while I tell you my sincere opinion of it. The Law, I take to be a very difficult and a very extensive Science and to acquire any considerable degree of knowledge in the Theory and of skill in the Practice, a serene head, a large...
Lieutenant Bullet, who commands at this place in the absence of Captain Hogg, tells me, that he applied to you for a few men to join such parties as this Garrison can afford, to range the woods, and assist the inhabitants in securing their Grain, gathering their Corn, &c. and that you have refused to aid him. I conceive if you did so, it must have proceeded from a misapprehension of his...
I look upon myself obliged to give you the reasons that induced me to resolve upon the study and profession of the law, because you were so kind as to advise me to a different profession. When yours came to hand I had thoughts of preaching, but the longer I lived, and the more experience I had of that order of men, and of the real design of their institution, the more objections I found in my...
2233Orders, 23 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
It is Colonel Washington’s positive orders to the Officer of the Day—to Captain Stone, and all overseers of the public works, not to suffer any man to straggle from his work, on any pretence whatever; as they are constantly running about the Streets, when they shou’d be employed. Therefore no man is to be seen in town without a ticket in writing from his overseer, setting forth the reasons of...
Last night I returned from a very long and troublesome jaunt on the Frontiers, as far as Mayo; where affairs seem to be in a dangerous situation: and to add to our misfortunes, I find our neighbourhood here on the wing—you and your Garrison, in great distress & danger. The Enemy ravaging the country about Conogochieg, stony-run, and South-Branch—Loud and general complaints for protection—few...
2235Orders, 24–26 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
The workmen on the Fort are to continue henceforth, ’till retreat beating every night. The Quarter-master is to deliver Blankets for each Sentry that is kept out at night: which are to be given to each relief, and taken care of for that purpose. LB , DLC:GW .
I recd Your Letter from Augusta & observe its Contents —the Behaviour of the Militia is very unaccountable, & am convinc’d they are under no Command; I order’d Part of the Militia to the Frontiers & there to remain till reliev’d by others, which I propos’d shou’d be done in a monthly manner, & so to be continued by a proper Rotation, instead thereof they go & come at their own Pleasure, & many...
2237Orders, 27–28 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
As Colonel Washington is to hold conference with the catawba Indians, betwixt eleven & twelve o’clock —He desires all the Officers in town to attend at that time. and during the time of conference, he orders a Sergeant & Drummer to beat through the Town, ordering all Soldiers & Towns people to use the Indians civilly and kindly; to avoid giving them liquor; and to be cautious what they speak...
I Received a Letter from Capt. Paris Deated the 21t of ⟨thi⟩s Month, he tels me that he Sent for Guns and other Necessarys for the Indians with him. the Indians are highly pleased with the Arms and the Large preparations made for them the wareour proposed sending a Runar to the Nation with one of the guns, and Likewis to Aqueant them what is provided for them. he makes no Dout of a great...
2239Orders, 29–30 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
The Guard to be reduced to a corporal and six men. The men to parade at 12 o’clock to-morrow, on beating the Long Roll, to attend prayers. LB , DLC:GW .
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1756–1757 (Philadelphia, 1757), pp. 23–4. When the newly elected Assembly met to organize on October 14, Governor Denny informed it that “several weighty Affairs” required their immediate attention: viz., an embargo on food, clothing, and warlike stores to possessions of France; provision for transporting and quartering British...
A Council of War, held at Fort Cumberland October 30th 1756. in pursuance of an order received from Colonel George Washington; agreeable to an order from Governor Dinwiddie; to consult whether it is most for the advantage of His Majesty’s Service, to keep or demolish Fort-Cumberland. Present. Lieut. Colo: Adam Stephen, President. Capt. Wm Bronaugh } { Capt. Hen. Woodward Capt. Robt Spotswood...
2242Orders, 31 October 1756 (Washington Papers)
Officers commanding Companies to set about making out their pay-rolls, in order to have them ready; as Captain Mercer is expected in town this night. So soon as the waggons arrive in town they are to be employed on the Fort; as they can not possibly go to-morrow. LB , DLC:GW . Aide-de-camp George Mercer went to Williamsburg on 10 October both to appear at the general court to testify in the...
Yesterday Mr McClanachan, Colo. Stewart, & Captn Brackanridge Came home here from Willg, and they report, that they made enquirie of the Gover: how they were to be paid for their Servts, and that the Govr deny’d he had given any orders to Inlist Servts nor would have any concern in the matter, I can find by them they are design’d to Cause me some Trouble, therefor Shall be much Oblidg’d if...
2244Orders, 1–5 November 1756 (Washington Papers)
Lt Lowry with one Sergeant & 25 men, to parade at 12 o’clock; and march as an Escort for the waggons. The men to be picketted; taking those who are least useful at the works. Detail for the party— The Colonel’s company 4 } Capt. Mercers 11 25 Rank & file Lt Williams’s 10 The Quarter-master to deliver out arms for all the waggoners; taking their receipts for them. LB , DLC:GW . See Orders, 31...
DS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania After the return of the provincial commissioners from the Easton Indian conference they resumed their regular sessions and began again to issue orders for money payments on November 23. By December 28 the end of their available funds was once more in sight and on that day and the next they authorized a few large payments, including one which turned over...
2246Mutiny Act, [4 November 1756] (Franklin Papers)
Reprinted (in part only) from The Statutes at Large of Pennsylvania from 1682 to 1801 , V (Wm. Stanley Ray, State Printer of Pennsylvania, 1898), 266–8. The Mutiny Act passed on April 15, 1756 (see above, VI , 434–7), expired by its own limitation on October 30. Two days before that event Franklin brought in a bill, by leave of the House, to renew the law for a short term. With nearly a...
ALS : Pierpont Morgan Library; also extract: The Royal Society The above is a Copy of my last, and I now send the two second Bills of Steevens and Ludwell. I wrote then in great Hurry, being just setting out for the Frontiers, to visit some of the Forts with the Governor; a long Journey. Since our Return, I have scarce had a Moment’s Time to write to my Friends, the Assembly sitting twice a...
We are inform’d that a vagancy has lately happen’d in your Regiment, by the Resignation of Ensign McCarty, and begs leave to Recommend the Bearer Mr Speake, a young Gentn who has ever since he join’d us, made the study of his Profession the principal object of his care and attention; he has with chearfulness undertaken and with the utmost Spirit and alacrity executed, every kind of Duty that...
2249Orders, 6–9 November 1756 (Washington Papers)
The men to parade to-morrow at 12 o’clock, at long-roll beating, to attend prayers. Lt Williams to take his tour of Duty with the other Officers. To-morrow being the anniversary of His Majestys Birth-day; the men to be drawn up at 12 o’clock, and marched to the Fort, there to fire three vollies, which is to be taken from the cannon—officers to appear in their Regimentals; and the Soldiers to...
In mine from Hallifax I promised your Honour a particular detail of my remarks and observations, upon the situation of our Frontiers, when I arrived at this place. Altho’ I was pretty explicit in my former, I can not avoid recapitulating part of the subject now : as my duty, and its importance for redress, are strong motives. From Fort-Trial, on Smith’s river, I returned to Fort-William, on...