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Results 7051-7080 of 183,496 sorted by date (ascending)
7051[Diary entry: 14 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
14. Warm & sometimes Sultry, with but little wind. In the Afternoon thunder & clouds with Slight Showers.
AD (draft): American Philosophical Society This emotional outpouring cannot be precisely dated. Verner Crane assigns it to January, 1769, because some of the ideas that it contains were elaborated in Franklin’s two letters printed in the Public Advertiser on January 17. Hays, on the other hand, assigns it to c . 1775. But that date is virtually ruled out by the reference to Corsica. In May,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This comes with my unhappy Son. How far he may be an Object of your Regard, is left entirely to your own Discretion. I have Nothing else to say in his Favour, but wish he may Merit some of your Good Will, which is all with our best Regards, from Your most obliged Servant Addressed: For / Benjamin Franklin, Esqr. / Craven-Street / London / per S.F: Parker
7054[Diary entry: 15 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
15. Rid to see Colo. Bassetts Meadow at Root’s.
7055[Diary entry: 15 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
15. Not so warm as yesterday.
7056[Diary entry: 16 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
16. Fishing for Sturgeon from Breakfast to Dinner but catchd none.
7057[Diary entry: 16 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
16. Wind at South but not fresh & tolerable warm, & clear.
7058[Diary entry: 17 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
17. Rid to the Brick House & returnd to Dinner.
7059[Diary entry: 17 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
17. Warm with but little Wind and that Southwardly.
At present the Road from Fort Cumberland to Pittsburg is very thickly Inhabited—so much so at least—as to render the communication easy & convenient for Travellers, & for the transportation of Provisions &ca from the Frontiers of this Colony to the last mentioned Garrison, and to the Settlers that now are, or may hereafter be fixed on the Ohio; but if the People on the other side of the...
I have sent the Boy with Mrs Washingtons things from mrs deavenports and have paid her Charge which is 27/6d. I like wise Saw mr Starke yesterday and he promist me to give his Bond this day for me to Bring to you But when I Came to his house he was gon to Sussex Cort and left a letter which I Send to you with severall other Letters[.] the tobaco in New Kent & King William is inspected and gon...
Printed in The Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser , May 18, 1768. In order to shew my countrymen the sentiments of the North Americans, I request you will publish in your paper the inclosed hand bill, which came over by the last ship from Philadelphia, and there is no doubt but great numbers of them have been dispersed in that and the other provinces. Franklin wrote only the first paragraph,...
7063[Diary entry: 18 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
18. Did the same & got my Chariot & Horses over to Claibornes.
7064[Diary entry: 18 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
18. Ditto——Ditto——Ditto. Note the Horns of this Moon were also up as the two last were tho a little more declining.
Letterbook copy: Georgia Historical Society From the Great opinion the Governor, Council and assembly have entertained of your integrity and abilities they have unanimously concurred in appointing you by an Ordinance agent to transact the affairs of this province in Great Britain, and we have now the pleasure of enclosing you an authentic Copy of the said Ordinance, by which you will see that...
7066[Diary entry: 19 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
19. Went a Shooting, & hair huntg. with the Hounds who started a Fox wch. we catched.
7067[Diary entry: 19 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
19. Warm and but little Wind which was Southwardly. The weather very hazy as it had been for several days with the Sun and Moon remarkably red.
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have wrote to you by Capt. Folkner this is to go by Capt. Storrey by Folkner. I send the watch to be dun what Mrs. Stephenson and you pies all thow I menshoned a Wat[ch?] chaine by Capt. Sparkes I leve it an have no choyce of my one [own] and I know that Salley will be plesed with what is chose for her. This day I deliverd E Browns Close to Mr. Town to...
7069[Diary entry: 20 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
20. Set of from Colo. Bassetts for Nomony. Crossd over to Claibornes—from thence by Frazers Ferry to Hobs hole dining at Webbs Ordinary. Nomini was a Westmoreland County neighborhood clustered around Nomini Creek, which emptied into the Potomac River about 12 miles below GW’s birthplace at Pope’s Creek. From Claiborne’s ferry, GW’s party rode through King William County to cross the Mattaponi...
7070[Diary entry: 20 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
20. Clear, and but little Wind, & that Southwardly.
7071[Diary entry: 21 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
21. Reachd my Brothr. John’s who & his wife were up the Country. Crossd over to Mr. Booths. Bushfield, where John Augustine Washington lived with his wife Hannah and their several children, was on the east bank of the Nomini near the mouth of the creek. “His House,” said young Philip Vickers Fithian who saw it in 1774, “has the most agreeable Situation, of any I have yet seen in Maryland Or...
7072[Diary entry: 21 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
21. Warm, & clear in the Morning. Afternoon lowering, Wind Southwardly.
7073[Diary entry: 22 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
22. Went to Church (nomony) & returnd to Mr. Booths to Dinner who was also from home in Glousester. Mr. Smith the Parson dind with us. Nomini Church was on the east bank of Nomini Creek about 3½ miles upstream from William Booth’s home. Rev. Thomas Smith (1738–1789) was the rector of Cople Parish, which comprised the lower end of Westmoreland County, including both Nomini and Yeocomico...
7074[Diary entry: 22 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
22. Showery all day. Wind pretty fresh from the Southward.
Not many Years ago, were transmitted to the Public, thro’ the Channel of the Boston-Gazette, a few desultory Essays, on the Spirit of the Canon and Feudal Law: in some of which were expressed Apprehensions of the future Mischiefs, that might be caused in America by the Efforts and Exertions of those expiring and detested systems. That those apprehensions were too well founded, Time has,...
7076[Diary entry: 23 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
23. At Mr. Booths all day with Revd. Mr. Smith.
7077[Diary entry: 23 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
23. Wind shifted in the Night to No. Et. Blew and Raind hard all Night & till One or two Oclock this day, when it ceasd. The Afternoon became pleasant.
7078[Diary entry: 23 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
23. My Carpenters & House People went to Work at my Mill repairing the Dams—hightening of them—& opening the Race.
7079[Diary entry: 24 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
24. Came up to Popes Creek & staid there all day. Pope’s Creek was an addition to the Bridges Creek plantation, the original seat of GW’s family in Virginia. In the 1720s GW’s father, Augustine, built a house on the site lying on the west side of Pope’s Creek about three-quarters of a mile from the Potomac River, and it was there that GW was born. On the death of GW’s father, the plantation...
7080[Diary entry: 24 May 1768] (Washington Papers)
24. Morning clear but Cool. Afternoon lowering & very Cool wind No. East.