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Results 13751-13800 of 183,496 sorted by date (ascending)
13751[Diary entry: 16 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
16. Rid into the Neck to the Plantations there. In the Aftern. Mr. Robt. Harrison came here.
13752[Diary entry: 16 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
16. Clear and warmer. With but little wind and that East.
The Pall or Black Cloath that was sent down to you on a late Occation Mr Carlyle Informs me was Originally your property, but as we are yet unprovided with one in town we must request the favour of you to send it by the bearer—Our Friend and Accquantance Mr Joseph Wattson Departed this life last night about Eleven oClock of a Bloody Flux, he neglectd himself much in the begining of the...
Printed in The Public Advertiser , September 17, 1773 As I gather from a very sensible Piece, entitled “ Rules and Orders for reducing a great Empire to a SMALL One ,” published in your Paper of Saturday last, that the Inhabitants of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay had all their Arms (which were bought of us with their own Money, and with which they fought so successfully in our glorious...
13755[Diary entry: 17 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
17. At home all day. In the Afternoon Mr. Harrison went away. GW paid Harrison on this day £5 for sundry legal opinions ( General Ledger B General Ledger B, 1772–1793. Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 5, Financial Papers. , folio 93).
13756[Diary entry: 17 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
17. Quite Calm, clear, & warm Morning being foggey.
ALS and LS (copy): Library of Congress The foregoing is Copy of my last since which I have not received any of your Favors; I have lately received a Letter from the Speaker of the House of Deputies of the Colony of Rhode Island desiring I would favor him with G Rome’s original Letter. I have wrote him that it is returned to England. Inclosed you have a Copy of the Speaker’s Letter and should...
13758[Diary entry: 18 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
18. Went to a Barbicue of my own giving at Accotinck. Mr. Robt. Alexander & his Bror. George came home with me.
13759[Diary entry: 18 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
18. Again Foggy; & somewhat Cloudy. Day very close & Warm.
13760[Diary entry: 19 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
19. The two Mr. Alexanders went away after breakfast. My Brother Sam—his Wife & Two children came to Dinner. Samuel Washington’s wife is Anne Steptoe Washington, and the two children are probably Thornton and Ferdinand Washington, although George Steptoe Washington, who was born to Samuel and Anne sometime during the early 1770s, may have been one of them ( WAYLAND [1] John W. Wayland. The...
13761[Diary entry: 19 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
19. Some, but not much, Rain fell in the Night. Day for the most part Cloudy with the wind at East.
13762[Diary entry: 20 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
20. I went up to Court, & returnd in the Afternoon. Colo. Mason, & Mr. Fendal came with me. The Fairfax court met only one day this month, and GW’s name does not appear on the list of attending justices. George Mason, who returned from Alexandria with him, had several cases that were being heard at this meeting (Fairfax County Order Book for 1772–74, 263–68, Vi Microfilm).
13763[Diary entry: 20 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
20. Clear and warm with the Wind Southerly.
Dr Cooper presents his most respectful Comps. to Coll Washington; & returns him his Son in Law, without any vices that he knows of, and with many Virtues, wherewith he is perfectly acquainted. His Assiduity hath been equal to his Rectitude of principle; and it is hoped his Improvements in Learning have not been inferior to either. AL , DLC:GW . John Parke Custis probably delivered Cooper’s...
I have taken the Liberty of addressing a Letter to you, on a Subject extremely agreeable to me, & which, I am sensible, must be particularly so to you. The Conduct of your Son, during his Residence at this Seminary, has been such, as that it would be injustice to deny him the Tribute of Approbation he deserves, & you Sr the Satisfaction which a generous Parent must receive from the Reputation...
In pursuance of a Resolution of this Society, I am to signify to you that you have this Day been duly elected a Member thereof. N.B. Subscriptions are received by frederick bull , Esq; Treasurer to this society , at his House in Leadenhall-Street, No. 96. Printed form on folded sheet approx. 13 by 8 inches ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “John Adams Esqr. Boston”; endorsed on address leaf: “Jan’y...
ALS (draft): American Philosophical Society I duly received your Favour of the 24th past, and some time after, the Parcel containing the Specimens and your valuable Present of Shaftsbury excellently printed for which I hold myself greatly obliged to you. The Specimens I shall distribute by the first Ships among the Printers in America, and I hope to your Advantage. I suppose no Orders will...
13768[Diary entry: 21 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
21. Colo. Mason & Mr. Fendal went away after Breakfast. I contind. at home all day. Mr. Robt. Hooe dind & lodgd here. Robert Townsend Hooe of Charles County, Md., was a partner in an Alexandria firm called Hooe, Stone & Co. until 1773, when it became Jenifer & Hooe. A few years later it became known as Hooe & Harrison ( Pa. Mag. , 61:64). Hooe was a member of the Charles County committee of...
13769[Diary entry: 21 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
21. Also clear and warm—wind in the same place.
Printed in The Public Advertiser , September 22, 1773. When this famous hoax first appeared, Franklin had the pleasure of seeing it taken at face value. Part of the reason, no doubt, was his shrewdness in choosing the fictional author. Frederick II of Prussia had been estranged from Britain by the Peace of Paris, and made no secret of his contempt for the country. He had recently suggested,...
13771[Diary entry: 22 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
22. My Brother and my self rid to my Mill & returnd to Dinner.
13772[Diary entry: 22 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
22d. Warm—Wind blowing pretty fresh from the So. West.
Letter not found: to Richard Thompson, 22 Sept. 1773. On 30 Sept. Thompson wrote : “In Answer to your Favour of the 22d Current.”
ALS : Public Record Office Nothing of Importance has occurr’d here since my last. This serves chiefly to cover a Newspaper, in which I have stated a few of the American Grievances that were omitted in my Receipt for diminishing a great Empire. These odd ways of presenting Matters to the publick View, sometimes occasion them to be more read, more talk’d of, and more attended to. With great...
13775[Diary entry: 23 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
23. At home all day.
13776[Diary entry: 23 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
23. Still Warm & Clear—Wind Blowing very fresh from the So. West.
We wrote you the 30th. July and are now to advise you of the safe arrival of the Virginian Capt. Emmes with 26 hhds. of your Tobacco, but no Letter, and what surprises us still more, is that the Owners of the Prince of Wales have received no Remittance nor even a Line from you, they have therefore demanded and we have this Day paid them Two thousand Nine hundred Pounds the ballance of the...
ALS (letterbook draft): American Philosophical Society At the Request of Dr. Hawkesworth I am to mention to you what occurr’d to me on reading the Copy of Mr. Alcock’s Letter, and in Conversation with the Dr. on your Affairs. There is no Grant of Land as yet to be obtained from those concern’d in the new Colony, their Grant from the Crown not having yet pass’d the Seals. With so many Children...
13779[Diary entry: 24 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
24. Ditto. Ditto.
13780[Diary entry: 24 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
24. Foggy Morning & a little Wind from the East. Forenoon Raining but clear afterwards.
I last Post received yours of the 12 instant wherein you beg to be informed whether I propose granting Patents on the Ohio to such Officers and Soldiers as Claim under His Majesties Proclamation in 8ber 1763. I do not mean to grant any Patents on the Western Waters, as I do not think I am at Present impowered so to do. I did indeed tell a poor old German Lieut. who was with me & inform’d me he...
I was on the point of expostulating with you for you[r] long silence when I receiv’d your[s] of Sept 6 by the hands of our worthy friend mr Ervin. I am surprized & chagrined to find you have not received a letter I wrote about six weeks ago. You may remember you promised to give me you[r] sentiments about my employing my talents provided I explained myself more fully upon that head. Eager to...
13783[Diary entry: 25 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
25. Still at home all day writing.
13784[Diary entry: 25 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
25. Clear with a little Wind from the Eastward—a little in the Night.
Your Letter of the 30th of March to Colo. Fairfax, never came to my hands (as his Attorney in Fact) till the middle of this Month —So much thereof as relates to the mismanagement of his Tobo I shall communicate to his Steward—the other parts respecting his Affairs in England you, doubtless, long before this have had an oppertunity of communicating yourself, as he with his Lady Imbarkd for...
I have heared (the truth of which, if you saw Lord Dunmore in his way to or from Pittsburg, you possibly are better acquainted with than I am) that his Lordship will grant Patents for Lands laying below the Scioto, to the Officers & Soldiers who claim under the Proclamation of October 1763. If so, I think no time shoud be lost in having them surveyed, lest some new revolution should again...
Since writing the enclosed, I have further understood that the Governor, from some displeasure at Capt: Bullet’s conduct, (whether for surveying at all , or for other persons , besides those claiming under the Proclamation; or whether for a speech & engagement wch he entered into with the Indians,) has order’d him in —If the Govrs displeasure proceeded from the last mention’d cause, I should...
Letter not found: to George William Fairfax, 25 Sept. 1773. On 10 Jan. 1774 Fairfax wrote : “Your very Obliging favour of the 15th of October, covering a Copy of one dated 25th of Septr last is just come to me.”
If you propose to go to the Annapolis Races—will accept of a Seat in my Phaeton—&, if the weather permits be here this afternoon I can give you a lift there & shall be glad of your Company. I shall, if I can, take an even start with the Sun tomorrow so as to reach Annapolis in good time. I hope this Letter will find you in better health than when I saw you last. I am with very sincere regard...
Scarce an hour ago, I wrote to you, making an offer of a Seat in my Phaeton; which I hope is unnecessary for me to repeat but if it be more convenient to you to go in a single Chair from Alexandria, than to come here this Evening, my Chair is at your Service, & brought up accordingly. I do not know that I can answer for the wheels. you will examine them, & judge for yourself. I am Yrs...
I received yours of the 12 August and give you this repeated Testimony of my punctuality. I got your letter to Mr Wallace at the same time much worn and abused. I have given it a new coat & shall forward it as soon as a safe Opportunity serves. Since you first hinted to me your suspence as to the settled business of your life, I have partook of your anxiety & [though it] has been often in my...
ALS : American Philosophical Society With this I return you Mr. Winthrop’s letter , according to your desire, thanking you for your endeavours to serve me in America, though I find, as I was apprehensive, that the scheme would not answer. Please to return my thanks to the professor for his candid and judicious remarks on my History of Opticks , which will be much improved by them, if it should...
13793[Diary entry: 26 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
26. I set of for Annapolis Races. Dined at Rollins’s & got into Annapolis between five & Six Oclock. Spent the Evening & lodged at the Governors. Most of the Rollins (Rawlins, Rawlings) families of Maryland lived in the South River and West River neighborhoods of Anne Arundel County, Md. For their presence on GW’s probable route, see COLLES Christopher Colles. A Survey of the Roads of the...
13794[Diary entry: 26 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
26. Clear and very warm with but little Wind.
In my Passage down the ohio in the Fall of the year 1770 I made choice of a piece of Land, being the first bottom on the So. East side the river above Capteening, as also a little above a place where the effects of a hurricane appear among the Trees, & opposite to a Creek on the other side near the upper end of the bottom, call’d Pipe Creek. The next Spring, when Capt: Crawford went down the...
13796[Diary entry: 27 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
27. Dined at the Govrs. and went to the Play in the Evening. Five days of racing began this day with a three-horse sweepstakes. As usual, all races began at 11:00 A.M.
13797[Diary entry: 27 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
27. Clear & very warm with but little Wind and that Southerly.
As neither Mrs Savage nor I have had the honor of hearing from you since your Letter of the 20th of Sepr Seventy two, we begin to apprehend her affairs are not in that prosperous situation we had reason to hope from your favors of that date, from this reflection, and from Mrs Savages anxiety on account of her Circumstances being on so precarious a foundation, Life is almost a burthen to heavy...
If it is not now too late, nor any former claim has been made in behalf of the Heirs of James Towers for a proportion of the Lands granted to the Virginia Troops who first went out with you—I beg this may be noticed as such and that you will be so good as inform me what is necessary to be done on my part to serve his relations—I think Mr Towers was a Lieutenant, whatever his share may...
13800[Diary entry: 28 September 1773] (Washington Papers)
28. Again Dined at the Govrs. and went to the Play & Ball in the Evening. Tuesday’s race was for the Jockey Club purse of 100 guineas, limited to horses of club members. The play was given by the American Company, which played through September in Annapolis. The ball was announced in the newspaper: “Assemblies as usual, on Tuesday and Friday” ( Md. Gaz. , 9 Sept. 1773).