Thomas Jefferson Papers
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Memorandum Books, 1793

1793.

Jan. 3. Lodged in bank of U. S. a quarter year’s salary 875.D.
4. Recd. from bank by Petit 125.D.
£  s 
Pd. Petit for  1675 ℔ hay 4– 16–  0 = 12. 8
furniture 16– 10½ = 2. 25
dress  9–  9 = 1. 3
table exp. Dec. 16—31 (42 @ .88)  13– 17–  4½ = 36. 98
his wages 18.5 20–  0–  0 = 53. 33
5.
Pd. servts. wages. towit John 7.D. Robert 7.D. Joseph 7.D. James 7.D. Brown 5.D }  = 33D.
Pd. John 21. bush. oats @ 2/10 = 7.94.
Pd. Fenno for 6. months gazette endg. Sep. 4. 1.5 D.
Pd. do. for his 3d. vol. 4.D.
Gave Mr. Rittenhouse order on bank for 102.67. for Equatorial.
6. Gave Maria .5—do. to pay for shoes 1.D.
7. Pd. Robertson for shoeing horses 4.
Gave the following orders on the bank of the U. S. to wit
£ D.
Thos. Lieper half year’s rent due this day 125– 0–0 = 333. 33
Thos. Carstairs for carpenter’s work 4– 8–6 = 11. 80
James Starr & son, shoemaker’s bill = 36. 40
Henry Ingle, Cabinet work 9– 15–2 = 26. 02
Wm. Whiteside.20 china £10–10 tea 22/6 11– 12–6 = 31.
Pd. J. Barclay for 1. doz. bott. claret 7.D.
Gave printer’s boy .25.
8. Recd. from bank by Petit 20.D.
Pd. Freneau one year’s gazette, 2 copies 6. Dol.
Pd. J. Barclay freight of a pipe of Lisbon ante July 25. 1791. from Lisbon 4.D.
9. Pd. for a ticket to see Blanchard’s baloon21 5.D.
10. Gave the following orders on the bank of the U. S. viz.
 
D.
Pepper H. account for beer. £6– 7–6 = 17.
May, Adam. baker’s account 9– 7–9 = 25. 03
Herbst & Lex. groceries to Jan. 8.   38–14–4 = 103. 25
14. Pd. for map 4.33.
15. Gave Stoneburner ord. on bank for 21.16 D. for 2675 ℔ hay.
17. Recd. from bank by Petit 75.D.
£ s d D.
Pd. Petit furniture 1– 0– 0 = 2 .67
dress 4– 9 = .63
packg. 6– 0 = .8
tab. exp. Jan. 1.—12   11– 2– = 29 .65  (24 @ 1.235)
33 .75
Maria for a comb 1.25—for her washing woman 5.D.
18. Pd. Anthony22 for setting lens 8.
Pd. last year’s subscription to Phil. society 2.D.
19. Pd. to correct error for hay (ante 15) 2.D.
22. Pd. Young for Asylum 2.67.
23. Pd. for 21. bush. oats @ 2/9 = 7.7.
24. Pd. for 2 cords ash & oak 48/ portage 8/ cordage 8d. cutting 5/6 = 8.29.
Pd. Petit on acct. 1.71.
25. Recd. from bank by Petit 40.D.
Pd. Matthew Carey for Museum 1.2.
Pd. John Carey for lottery in books 15.D.
Pd. for 2. lantherns 3.6.
27. Pd. for ribbon .25.
28. Pd. Petit on acct. 5.D.

Jan.

30.
£  s d D.
Petit’s accts. Jan. 13—26.  table expences 25– 10– = 68. 1
contingencies 12– = 1. 68
26– 3– 5 = 69. 78  (64 @ 1.09)
 by cash ante Jan.  24    1.71      
 by do. ante 28 5. 6. 71
 balance 63. 07
 pd. this day 15.
 leaves balance due 48. 07
31. Pd. portage of a book .26.
Feb. 1. Sold my horse Brimmer to Saml. Clarkson23 for 120.D.
 
2. Pd. for a book .6.
3. Pd. Maria balance .26.
Recd. from Saml. Clarkson 120.D. for the horse.
4.
Pd. Petit  the balance ante 48.07
his wages of last month  18.5
66.57
Pd. servts. wages to wit John 7.D. Robert 7.D. Joseph 7.D. James 7.D. Brown 5.D. }  33 D.
7. John for straw 1.D.
Pd. for a lens .5.
11. Pd. for another do. .25.
15. Pd. Petit on acct. 10.D.
Gave Maria for shoes & ribbon 1.4 for herself .5.
Gave in charity .25.
Pd. for 600. ℔ hay 3.5.
19. Borrowed of Mr. Taylor 200.D.
Maria for clothes 10.D.
Pd. Petit on acct. 10.D. also pd. him by Maria .87.
20. Pd. for needles & thread .125.
Pd. her his acct. in full 22.1.
Pd. Mrs. Fullarton 6. months board of Maria 80.D.
21. Gave in charity .5.
Pd. for a cord of oak 23/6 cordg. &c. 6/7 = 4.01.
22. Pd. Petit on acct. 5.D.
24. Gave Maria .5 do. for shoes 1.
26. Pd. Petit on acct. 10.D.
Pd. Stine for oats 4.25.
27. Pd. Petit for wood 3.95 + on acct. 1.05.
28. Maria for clothes 9/4.
Mar. 1. Pd. servts. wages viz. John 7. Robert 7. Joseph 7. James 7. Brown 5. = 33.D.
Paid Petit on account 10. Doll.
Pd. John 450. ℔ hay 3.5 + 25 bundles of straw = 375 ℔ 1.D.
2. Borrowed of Mr. Taylor 100.D.
Pd. Elder24 taylor’s acct. 12.2.
Pd. Petit his wages 18.5.
3. Maria .5.
6. Petit 10.D.
7. John 500. ℔ hay 3.33.
 
9. Gave a boy .125.
Accepted my sister Carr’s Excha. on me for £10–5 Virga. paiable Apr. 4. drawn in favr. Wm. Austin, assd. to Lott & Higba.
11. Petit on acct. 10.D.
Parker a year’s subscription to Columbian Magazine25 endg. Jan 1. 94. 1.22.
Mar. 12. Petit on acct. 10.D.
14. John 500. ℔ hay 3.33.
15. ¾ cord hiccory 24/ cordg. &c. 5/5 = 3.93.
Petit on acct. 10.D.
16. Pd. Sharpless the sadler 19/2.
17. Maria .5 do. shoes .4.
19. John 550. ℔ hay 25/.
20. Petit 2.D. bricklayer 1.33.
23. Maria .625.
24. Petit 2.D.
25. 12 ℔ clover seed 2.D.
26. John 600 ℔ hay 26/.
Petit 1.1.
27. Borrowed of Mr. Taylor 50.D.
Petit 10.D. pasteboard 7d.
Richardson26 for a lens 2.D.
29. Mr. Elouis27 for 20. lessons drawing for Maria 9.89.
Maria .5.
30. Petit 5.D.
Portage of 12. loads of furniture28 to warehouse 8.
Apr. 2. Books 3/.
 
3. Petit 10.D.
Pd. Erringer29 3. pr. stockings 3.
4. Lodged in bank US. a quarter’s salary 875.D.
5. Pd. Lott & Higba by ord. on bk. US. the 34.16 ante Mar. 9.
Lent J. W. Eppes ord. on bk. 80.D.30
Received from bank by Petit 100.D.
Pd. Petit 5.D.
6. Pd. Trumble31 for 12. chairs 20.D. + paintg. 6. do. 1.4 = 21.4.
Pd. portage  7. loads of books into the country 7.D.
8. loads of furniture to waterside 16/10.
Pd. servts. wages towit Joseph 7.D. Robert 7.D. James 7.D. Brown 5.D. John 7.D. }  33.D.
Pd. John for Robertson shoeing horses 12/.
7. Gave Maria 1.29.
Pd. her for Cenas in full 8.66.
8. Pd. setting up iron back & sides 1.5.
Pd. portage of looking glasses to water side 2.D.
9. Recd. from bank 100.D.
Pd. Joseph on his discharge 3.D.
Pd. Petit on acct. 45.D.
Pd. portage  2 loads of books to country 2.
Pd. do. furniture to water side 2.
Pd. small exp. 1/5.
Pd. subscription to Blanchard for baloon 20.D.
Moved into country.32
11. Pd. for pamphlets .55.
13. Recd. from bank by Petit 60.D.
Pd. washing to Mar. 1. 20.D.
 
Pd. farmer  for ploughg. & sowing 7.D.
for 13. loads of furniture brought out 12.
Pd. Petit on acct. 21.D.
Portage of wine 1.D.
Apr. 14. Gave Maria to pay for coat 4.D—for Moller 1.5—herself .25.
15.
Pd.  Stine’s acct. 11.78. }  15.
do. in part for more oats 3.22 
17.
Pd. Petit  5.D.
Do. 5.D.
20.
Recd. from bank a post-note for Richd. Curson 12.D.
21. Inclosd. do. to Curson to pay freight of 3. pipes Termo wine.33
22. Gave Maria 1.D.
23. Recd. from bank by Petit 30.D.
Pd. Petit 18.D.
24. Pd. barber .125.
26. Pd. portage of necessary .5.
27.
Pd.  R. Leslie for great clock34 113.80
cleaning small do. 1.50
by order on bank 115.30
28. Pd. ¼ of my subscription for Michaud’s journey35 to Pacific sea 12.5.
29. Recd. from bank by Petit 25.D.
30. Pd. Petit 15.D.
Pd. Fisher36 mending thermometer 3.D.
May 1. Maria for clothes 2.D.
3. Gave horseler .25.
 
4. Recd. from bank by Petit 70.D.
Pd. Erringer for 3. pr. stockings 3.D.
John Golden comes into my service as coachmn. @ 9.D.
Pd. John Riddle 8.D. He leaves my service.
Pd. servts. wages. towit Robert 8.D.
5. James 8. John the scullion 5.D.
Petit 18.5 for wages & 11.5 on account.
Maria .31.
6. Do. for musick .81.
9. Barber .19.
10. Gave note to bank of U. S. for £67–19–7 + the disct. say 183.1 D. payable @ 60 Days. which pd. to Lieper in full of rent.
13. Gave Maria to pay her Mantua maker 43/3—herself .5.
Pd. 5.D. to Petit.
Recd. from bank by Crosby 50.D.
£  s
Pd.  Joseph Perkins37 for a rifle 4– 10 } which I had given to Baptist DeCoin a Kaskaskia Indian for his son.40
Wm. Wood for cloth &c. 2– 5 –8
Benj. Scull38 for a hat 1– 2 –6
Michl. Roberts39 for powder flask  5 –7½
8– 3 –9½ = 21.84
Pd. Dunlap vol. his gazette for 1792 11.D.
14. Recd. from G. Wythe Hoops’s note on J. Barclay for 64.D. to pay for the Chancery seal41 I had made for him. Lodged it in bank for collection.
16. Pd. John Golden his wages 4.D. & discharged him.
Pd. him also for a pr. leather breeches 5.D.
17. Pd. Petit half a cord of wood 2.D.
Pd. Robinson shoeing horses 22/—horseler at Eagle42 .25.
 
Thomas Lapseley43 comes into my service @ 8.D. the month.
Pd. Petit on acct. 3.5.
18. Recd. from bank by Petit 35.D.
Pd. Petit on acct. 18.D.
May 19. Borrowed of Petit .25—pd. pontage at Gray’s .25.
Pd. Maria for Godfrey Welzell 6.67—for herself .4.
Jan. Feb. Mar.
27. 3  1. 3 .  8 . 17 .  15. 2 .  22. 3 .   1. 4 .  8. 2 .  15. 2 .  22. 2 .
28. 8 .   2. 4 . 9 . 1 . 16. 5 . 23. 7 .  2. 1 . 9. 2 . 16. 2 . 23. 3 .
29. 4  3. 3 . 10 . 8 . 17. 1 . 24. 3 .  3. 3 . 10. 5 . 17. 4 . 24. 2 .
30. 1  4. 1 . 11 . 1 . 18. 2 . 25. 1 .  4. 3 . 11. 4 . 18. 1 . 25. 4 .
31. 2  5. 8 . 12 . 1 . 19. 2 . 26. 8 .  5. 2 . 12. 2 . 19. 1 . 26. 2 .
 6. 1 . 13 . 8 . 20. 3 . 27. 8 .  6. 5 . 13. 8 . 20. 1 . 27. 3 .
 7. 4 . 14 . 2 . 21. 3 . 28. 1 .  7. 2 14. 3 . 21. 1 . 28. 2 .
29. 2 .
30. 3 .
31. 3 .
18 . 24 38 18 31 . 20 26 12 27 44  =  214
 Apr. May. June
 1. 8 . 11. 1 . 21 . 2 .  1. 2 . 11. 2 . 21. 1 . 1. 2 . 11. 1 . 21. 1
 2. 2 . 12. 0 . 22 . 1 .  2. 1 . 12. 2 . 22. 0 . 2. 2 . 12. 2 . 22. 1
 3. 3 . 13. 1 . 23 . 1 .  3. 1 . 13. 1 . 23. 0 . 3. 1 . 13. 0 . 23. 1
 4. 2 14. 2 . 24 . 2 .  4. 0 . 14. 0 . 24. 1 . 4. 1 . 14. 1 . 24. 1
 5. 2 . 15. 1 . 25 . 1 .  5. 2 . 15. 2 . 25. 0 . 5. 6 . 15. 2 . 25. 1
 6. 1 . 16. 1 . 26 . 1 .  6. 1 . 16. 1 . 26. 2 . 6. 1 . 16. 1 . 26. 1
 7. 3 . 17. 2 . 27 . 2 .  7. 0 . 17. 0 . 27. 1 . 7. 0 . 17. 0 . 27. 1
 8. 0 18. 1 . 28 . 2 .  8. 2 . 18. 2 . 28. 0 . 8. 0 . 18. 1 . 28. 1
 9. 0 19. 1 . 29 . 1 .  9. 1 . 19. 2 . 29. 0 . 9. 2 . 19. 0 . 29. 2
10. 1 . 20. 2 . 30 1 . 10. 1 . 20. 1 . 30 1 . 10 2 . 20. 1 30. 2
22 12 14 11 13 31. 0 . 17 9 12 =  116
6
23. Recd. from bank by Crosby 25.D.
Pd. Stine 13.64 pd. for 3. ℔ shot 2/.
24. Pd. Maria for Gist 10.95—for cloaths 2.5—for Manteau makr. 1.24 pd. do. for herself .31 = 15.
Pd. Petit 1.D. borrd. of do. .1 pd. pontage at Gray’s .1.
25. Pd. Petit 5.D.
28. Recd. from bank by Crosby 20.D.
Pd. Petit 10.D.—gave boatmen of L’Embuscade45 2.D.
 
30. Gave note to bank of N. A. for 300.D. paiable @ 60. days, endorsed by J. Bringhurst.
Endorsed a note for 1000.D. payable at bank of U. S. in 60. days for E. Randolph as his security.
31. Pd. Petit 1.D.
June 1. Pd. do. 5.D.
3. Pd. Maria for muslin .19 for herself .81 = 1.D.
Recd. from J. Bringhurst 100.D. of the above 300.
Pd.  Petit on acct. 1.5—his wages 18.5 D. = 20.
James 8.D. Cuffy for ½ month 3.D.
Repd. Petit the .25 + .1 ante 19. & 24. = .35.
4. Pd. Petit 25.D.
Pd. Weaver on acct. of milk, vegetables, portage, work 9.25.
6. Pd. Robert his wages 8.D. Thomas do. 4.D.
8. Pd. Petit 5.D.
10. Gave Maria to pay Folwell46 drawg. master 4.D.
Gave do. for herself .38 + .62 = 1.D.
11. Pd. for a tin butter cooler .2 pd. Petit 2.D.
12. Pd. Billy part of washing account 10.D. charity .66.
Recd. from Bringhurst in part of the note of May 30 120.D.
Recd. also from do. in part of do. a bank post note for 53.28.
13. Inclosed the sd. bank post note to Adam Lindsay Norfolk for candles.
Pd.  Dunwoody tavern bill 3– 7 –1 = 8.95
Bryning. smith’s do. 3– 12 –7½ = 9.68
Douglass47 for iron back &c.  3– 4 –3 = 8.57
Guest. long lawn 9 = 1.20
Maria for clothes 10 –6 = 1.40   29.8
June 14. Petit on acct. 10.D.

15.
    £  s    d
Do. for  Stock for glazing 0– 10 –7½ = 1. 42
Johnson. plaistering 1– 10 = 4.
Whitesides. china 2– 7 = 6. 27
Barclay. claret 2– 14 = 7. 20
himself on acct. 6. 11
25.
 
17. Pd. seeing Blanchard’s parachute48 1.D.
Pd. Crosby small exp. 2.D.
18. Pd. Samuel Biddle49 his expences from & to Elkton 5.D.
19. Petit on acct. 10.D. charity 1.D.
20. Feedg. horses &c. at falls of Schuylkill .75.
21. Horseler at Eagle .25.
22. Petit 10.D.
25. Pontage to W. Hamilton’s .12.
26. Petit 4.D. Maria .75.
28. Pd. Parish for a hat 4.D.
Inclosed Greenleaf for vol. of newspapers50 6.16 gloves .5.
Petit 5.D.
July 1. Maria .5.
Recd. of J. Bringhurst 23.47 being balance of the 296.75 for 300.D. ante May 30.
Charity .25.
2. Pd. for tin .125.
Recd. a quarter’s salary 875.D. & depositd. in bank US.
Recd. from bank by Mr. Taylor 100.D.
Pd. servts. wages. to wit Petit 18.5 Thomas 8. Robert 8. James 8. Cuffy 6. = 48.5.
3.
Pd. Petit  for Gardener balance washg. to June 1. 10.D.
for Chiles & Swaine 7.9.
for Deschamps for 300 ℔ hay 2.4.
 
Gave orders on bank of the U. S. to following person.
Billington. taylor    23. 3
Carstairs. carpenter. 65. 49
West John for plank 43. 14
Ingles Henry. cabinetmaker 22. 5
Patton Robert51 book binder 26. 37
Reynolds James. framg. lookg. glasses 99. 53
280. 33
6. Gave orders on do. to following persons.
 £
Herbst & Lex grocer’s acct. to June 29. 26–1–3½  = 69.50
Adam May. baker’s acct. in full 10–5–3 = 27.37
Henry Pepper. brewer’s do. Jan. 5. to June 26.  10–7–6 = 27.67
Henry Sheaff wine £12. vinegar 9/4½ 12–9–4½ = 33.25
157.79
Pd. Jacob Stine for 35½ bush. oats £5–9 = 14.53.
Pd. to bank in discharge of my note to Lieper for 183.10 ante May 10. by an order on itself.
Pd. Weaver his acct. portage, vegetables milk &c. 4.65.
Gave Maria .5.
8. Pd. Petit 10.D. do. 5.D.
July Aug. Sep.
 1. 1 11 1. 21. 0.  1. 0 11. 2. 21. 1  1 2 11 3
 2. 1 12 1. 22. 1.  2. 0 12. 1 22. 1  2 2 12 3
 3. 2 13 2. 23. 1  3. 2 13. 1 23. 1  3 3 13 3
 4. 0 14 2. 24. 1  4. 2 14. 6 24. 2  4 3 14
 5. 1 15 1 25. 0  5. 1 15. 1 25. 2  5 3 15
 6. 2 16 1 26. 1  6. 1 16. 1 26. 0  6 3 16
 7. 2 17 2 27. 2  7. 2 17. 2 27. 1  7 2 17
 8. 1 18 0 28. 2  8. 0 18. 2 28. 2  8 3 18
 9. 1 19 1. 29. 0  9. 6 19. 1 29. 1  9 3 19
10 2 20. 2. 30. 1 10. 2 20. 0 30. 6 10 3 20.
31. 1 31. 2
July 9. Pd. pontage at Grey’s .09.
10. Pd. Petit on acct. 5.D.
11. Pd. Mclaughlin & Taggert for coffee by order on the bank 25.97.
13. Recd. from bank by Petit 30.D.
Pd. Petit 10.D.
15. Pd. Fenno a half year’s gazette 1.5.
 
16. Gave Maria to pay Guenin 12.D.
Pd. Petit on acct. 5.D.
18. Pd. portage of 2. boxes of china from Mr. Dowse52 .45.
19. Recd. from the bank by Crosby 20.D.
Pd. Petit on acct. 10.D. pd. for gloves .5.
20. Pd. for wood 1.75.
22. Gave Maria to pay Elouise 10/—herself 3/1½.
Pd. poor tax 10/2.
23. Pd. Petit on account 5.D.
25. Thomas for oil .5 Maria .25.
26. Recd. from the bank U. S. by Crosby 25.D. horseler .125.
Petit on acct. 10.D.
27. Pd. Thomas 3. bushels of rye 17/.
29. 53 Maria .25.
* 30. Signed a note for 600.D. paiable at bank of N. A. in 60. days. Indorsed by J. Bringhurst. Note he is to take up my note of 300.D. ante May 30. and to draw the balance & pay to me.
Petit on acct. 7.D.
Aug. 1. Recd. from bank US. by Crosby 40.D.
2. Pd. for wood 2.D.
Petit on acct. 10.D.
3. Servts. wages. to wit Thomas 8.D. Robert 8. James 8. Cuffy 6. = 30.
* Gave in the note of 600.D. this day, changg. it’s date accordingly.
4. Maria .5.
5. Recd. of J. Bringhurst 35.D. in part of the 600. ante.
Pd. Petit wages 18.5 D.
Pd. Weaver his acct. portage 9/6 mowing 12/3 milk & vegetab. 47/11 = £3–19–8.54
9. Recd. from J. Bringhurst 65.D. on acct. of the 600. ante.
Pd. Whitesides & Collier for linen for Maria 21.67.
 
Pd. Barnes55 for ½ ℔ Imperial tea 1.5.
Pd. Trumble chairs 5.D.
10. Gave Petit to pay for 4. doz. towels 12.
Pd. do. on acct. 8.D.
Gave Maria for stockgs. 4.4.
Pd. Voight for mending & cleaning watch 4.67.
Pd. for wood 2.D.
11. Gave Maria .5.
13. Petit 5.D.
Aug. 14. Maria for handkerchiefs 24/.
16. Recd. of John Bringhurst 40.D. on acct. of the 600.
Pd. Peter Gordon shoemaker for J. W. Eppes £3–13–6 = 9.8.
Pd. Petit for 3. iron stoves 2.11.
Pd. do. on acct. 10.D.
18. Pd. for wood 2.D.
19. Pd. Billy Gardner 6. months washing (endg. Aug. 6.) for Maria 12.D.
20. Gave horsler .25.
Petit 4.D.
21. Recd. of Bringhurst 40.D.
22. Pd. Jones56 the smith 6/6.
23. Petit on acct. 5.D.
Pd. Spurck in part for clock 15.D.
24. Pd. Billy Gardner for J. Madison 34.70.
27. Pd. for a book 1.5—Maria .5.
Petit 6.
29. Maria for makg. linen 3.73.
Pd. County & town tax 26/6 = 3.53.
Recd. of Bringhurst 30.D.
Pd. Petit 10.D.
30. Pd. Thomas his wages of the month 8.D.
Recd. of Bringhurst 10.D.
31. Pd. Petit 3.D. pd. Thos. for expences to Georgetown57 13.D.
Pd. for wood 1.75.
Sep. 1. Pd. a messenger to town .25 gave Maria .5.
2. Petit 3.D. pd. a yd. catgut .25.
 
4. Pd. to Petit by Bringhurst 10.D.
5. Recd. of J. Bringhurst 40.D.
Pd. Robertson the smith 42/.
Pd. servants wages. Robert 8.D. James 8. Cuffy 6.
7. Gave Maria .5.
Pd. Petit 5. pd. for wood 2.D.
8. Recd. back from Thos. surplus of expences .47.
<Recd. a horse from TMRandolph junr.>
10. Pd. portage 1.D.
Pd. for 3. bushels rye & pontage 16/9.
Endorsed a note of 200.D. to bk. US. for George Taylor @ 60. days.
13. Gave my note for 100.D. paiable in 60. days to John Ross.
Gave him order for 215.D. on Mr. Bankson58 in 21. days.
Recd. from him in return an order for 315.D. on bank Pensva.
Pd. washing 1.20.
14. Recd. by Crosby from bank of Pensva. 315.D.
Pd. Mrs. Gardner a quarter’s washing 20.D.
Pd. Fenno for gazette & advertising 3.15.
Pd. for hay 13/6.
D.
Gave Mr. Bankson order on the treasury for  875.
Gave do. order on J. Bringhurst 48.
Note this balances the note of 600.D. and my gun sold for 24 D.
See memm.59 to Mr. Bankson how to dispose of the money.
Sep. 16. Pd. G. Gray for butter & oats 6.40.
Pd. Jones the smith 3.D.
17. Pd. Weaver in full for cream, herbs, portage 15.18.
Pd. Maria’s maid 3.D.
Pd. James 8.D. Robert 10.D. Cuffy 6.D. Thomas 12 D.
Petit 40.D. pd. do. for porter 1.1 do. for Grey for beer 1.
Set out for Monticello.60
Gray’s pontage .16—Spuryear’s61 dinner &c. 1.97. 2. 13
 
18. Newport. lodging &c. 3.
Elkton. messenger & barber .8 breakft. &c. 1.97.

19.
Susquehanna.  ferrge. &c.   1.7.
lodgg. &c. 4.325.
Bushtown breakft. &c. 1.2.
Webster’s oats  .45.
7. 47
20.
Baltimore.  barber, <powder,> pomatum .75.
Starck’s62 lodging &c. 6.13.
6. 725
Elkridge ferrge. .31.
Spuryear’s breakft. &c. 1.51.
Vanhorn’s oats .4. 8. 35
21.
Georgetown.  expences of Thomas & Jupiter 4.47.
dinner, lodgg. &c. 4.5 ferrge. 1.06.
Alexandria.  toll .18—toothbrushes, powder, barber 2.12.
gloves for Maria .31 smith 1.
recd. from Col. Fitzgerald for horse 18.33.
messenger to Georgetown 2.
breakft. dinner &c. 4.5 a guide .1.
15. 4663
22. Mount Vernon. servts. 1.5.
Colchester.  mending wheel 1. dinner &c. 2.33.
ferrge. .69.
23.
Dumfries.  barber .2 lodgg. &c. 4.29.
servts. .125.
10. 01
Shoemake’s. breakft. &c. 1.29. 1. 415
24. Adams’s mill. oats .125.
Orange C. H. dinner &c. 1.97. 2. 095
25. Mr. Madison’s. servt. .25. . 25
Cash on hand.  gold      105.34
silver 41.26
146.60
53. 905
 
26. Gave J. Garld. Jefferson 40.D.
27. Mrs. Randolph for small exp. 8.D.
Oct. 3. Gave in Charity 4.D. paid for lime .2.
12. Recd. of Bowling Clarke £55–5–6 = 184.26.
13. Pd. Wm. Reynolds for butter 1.
14. Accepted my sister Carr’s order in favr. of Myers for £55–18–2 payable in Richmd. Nov. 30 = 186.36.
19. Pd. Wm. Reynolds for butter, eggs &c. 3/9 + 2/3 on acct.
20. Recd. of Joseph Price for smith’s work 3.
22. Sent by T. Shackleford to Fitch for 6. chairs 3.D.
I have agreed with Watson64 to come & work for me at 120.D. a year, 500 ℔ pork & corn.
24. Gave J. Garld. Jefferson the balance of his year’s allowance 51.66.
25. Gave Maria 3.
Put into hands of TMRandolph junr. 20.D. to pay expences of removing my furniture from Rocket’s65 to Belvedere.
Left Monticello.
Oct. 25. Pd. oats at Gordons66 .4.
26. Do. at Wright’s .3.
27. Dinner lodging &c. at Gatewood’s67 2.1.
Fredsbg. barber .25 ferrge. &c. Chatham68 .25 servt. .1.
Gave Bob for his expences 3.
Pd. Benson breakft. lodgg. &c. 7.57.
Pd. for 2 passages in the stage to Alexandria 6. servt. .1.
28. Ferrge. at Falmouth .1.
Stafford C. H. breakfast .5.
Colchester. dinner &c. 1.1.
 
29.
Alexandria.  barber .25—lodgg. at Wise’s .7.
2 seats in stage to Baltimore 7.66.
servt. .2.
Georgetown ferrge. .2.
Bladensbg. breakfast .62.
Spuryear’s dinner 1.43 servt. .2.
30.
Baltimore  barber .2 servt. .2.
lodging at Storck’s 3.66.
Bush. dinner 1.91.
31.
Susqueha.  ferrge. and ferrymen .5.
Rogers’s supper & lodging 1.43 servt. .125.
Elkton breakfast .73.
Nov. 1. Brandywine. dinner & lodging at Stewart’s 1.5.
Chester. breakfast .69 servt. .25 barber .25.
Germantown. pd. Hartman Elliot for bringing me from Baltimore 6 days coming & going 30.D. ferriages 3.18 = 33.18.
(All the preceding travelling expences amount to 77.65.
4. Pd. James wages 8.D. washing .5 servt. .125.
5. Pd. for inkpot .18.
12. Gave the cook at Bockius’s69 .5.
Pd. Bockius’s bill 11. days entt. 29.61.
13. Pd. Gilliams70 drawing a tooth 4.66.
14. Pd. Franks71 the barber 1.125 washing 1.
Pd. Bockius’s second bill 12.03. Note 3.33 was for board of Lapseley the office keeper.
15. Pd. barber .25 James hhd. exp. 3. table 1.33 slippers 1.25.
16. Pd. for shoebrushes .31 cutting wood .2.
17. Pd. barber .125.
 
18. Pd. for mending lock .2.
Gave my note to bank of US. for 875.D. @ 60. days.
19. Have credit at bank for do. 865.82.
Inclosed to John Ross ord. on bank for 100.D. for note Sep. 13.
20. Pd. Dr. Shippen his acct. in full by ord. on bank for 63.67.
Inclosed to Mr. Taylor ord. on bank for 20.D. in a bank bill to be sent to Jacob Hollingsworth to buy clover seed.72
Pd. James for hhd. exp. 1.D.
Pd. Gilliams dentist 2.33.
21. Inclosed to Jacob Hollingsworth the bank bill for 20.D.
22. Gave Philip Freneau order on bank for 18.75 to wit.
for  myself to Oct. 26. 93. 6.
James Madison 4. 5
Ambrose Madison 6.
for  cash I recd. for Jos. Jones   2. 25
18. 75
Gave order on bank for 186.36 to be remitted to Myers in a post bill to pay the order of Mrs. Carr ante Oct. 14.
Gave order on bank US. for 40.D. in a post bill to be remitted to A. Stewart to buy sheep.73
Patrick Kennon remitted to me an order of Charles Smith & co. on Elliston & Perot for 109.83 due to Wm. Short for which I am to credit W. S.
He inclosed me W. Short’s certificates of stock in his hands, to be transferred from the office in N. Y. to that in Philada. in W. S.’s own name, so these certificates will not enter into acct. between W. S. & myself.
They are  2800 . 6 percents
2356 . 3. percents
2150 . deferred
7306
Indorsed Smith & co.’s bill for 109.83 to bank of US. to be collected & entered to my credit.
Pd. Meng for horsehire 1.33.
Pd. do. for ½ cord hiccory 2.83 of which charge half for the office.
 
23. Pd. Ingles in full by ord. on bank 67.03 pd. washg. 1.5.
Pd. for cord of wood 5.33 cutting .6 (half to office.
Pd. Peter Didier for 7. pr. stockgs. 59/ overpd. do. on acct. 11/.
Pd. James hhd. exp. 11/2 + 3/10 = 2.
24. Inclosed to Myers the bank post note for 186.36 D. on acct. of my assumpsit to him for Mrs. Carr.
Inclosed to A. Stewart a bank post note for 40.D. to buy sheep.
25. James for hhd. exp. 5.
Gave Mrs. Fullarton ord. on bank for 66.67 in full.
Recd. from bank by Crosby 50.D.
Pd. Campbell74 for books 4.D. pd. for lenses 1.5 barber .375.
Pd. Wirtz groceries in full 4.48.
29. Pd. for horse to Phila. .67 washing .75.
30. Pd. Wirtz ½ ℔ coffee .09.
Recd. for wood remaining 4.D.
Pd. Weiss75 for 15 days board of Thomas Lapsely office keeper 5.D.
Pd. James hhd. xp. 7/2 + 4d = 1.D.
Pd. Dr. Logan for a plough76 8.D.
Pd.  Crosby for pomatum &c. 2.22.
do. waggonage Germ. T. .5.
Pd. coachee from Germ. Town 2.33.
Recd. from J. Bringhurst part of note of Aug. 3. 23.D. (or of 48.D.)
Delivered do. 2 peices of New York gold to be changed.
Dec. 6. Pd. T. Lapseley wages as office keeper 6.13.
Pd. Richardson for spectacles 7.8.
Pd. Blame acct. for porter 2.17.
Dec. 7. Paid coach-hire .25.
10. Pd. for shaving brush .125—salve .125.
 
11. Accepted Fenwick & Mason’s bill for wine77 205.42 D. @ 30. days sight to Joseph Anthony & son.
Gave charity .125.
12. Gave order on bank US. for 62.8 to John Vaughan for his bill for £13–13 sterl. on Byrd, Savage & Byrd paiable to T. Pinckney, and inclosed it to T. Pinckney to pay for threshing model.78
13. Pd. tinman .187.
14. Recd. from bank by Crosby 50.D.
Pd. Bryning in full 9.97.
Pd. Stine’s acct. for oats by order on bank for 22.69.
Pd. Freneau for advertising79 J. Nicholas’s land 2.D.
16. Pd. for 1. cord wood 5.D. cartg. & wharfage .8 cutting .8 = 6.6.
Pd. Carstairs by ord. on bank his acct. 27.D.
17. Pd. Price80 the watchmaker .36.
Pd. Delany duties on Maccaroni .7.
Pd. Aitken for books 6.D.
19. Pd. Weaver carting 13 loads of furniture to the city 13.D.
Pd. for a cheese 16½ ℔ 4.125.
20. Pd. for book .81 4 ℔ lucerne seed 10/ other seed 2/6 = 1.67.
24. Pd. Peter Dedier for stockings 4.26.
Pd. for violin strings 2.06.
 
26. Pd. for books 2. for pencils .26.
27.
Pd.  Crosby for wood 2.56 for package & drayage of goods 4.75 } 20.81
for Vanuxem for freight & storage of Maccaroni 3.5
for Odier81 for 1. doz. bottles of oil 10.
Recd. by Crosby from Bringhurst balance of note of Aug. 3. 25.D.
Recd. from do. in part for gold of Nov. 30. 8.D.
28. Pd. Crosby package & drayage 3/1½.
Pd. for a book 2.D.
30. Pd. Sellers82 for wire netting for doors 38/10.
Pd. for mendg. locket 1.5.
Gave Betty Whitesides ord. on bank for china & tea 43.67.
Recd. from the bank by Crosby 50.D.
Pd. Voight mendg. watches 1.D.
31. My balance remaining in the bank of US. is 112.37.

20 William Whiteside was a tea merchant at 78 North Second Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

21TJ was present at the first successful manned balloon ascent in America. On 9 Jan. 1793 the celebrated French aeronaut Jean Pierre Blanchard (1750-1809) rose from the courtyard of the Walnut Street Prison in a hydrogen balloon and, after a forty-six minute flight, descended in Deptford Township, Gloucester County, N.J. As Blanchard’s expenses exceeded the proceeds of his adventure, a fund, to which TJ contributed $20, was established to remunerate him (Jackson, Encyclopedia of Philadelphia, i, 217-19 description begins Joseph Jackson, Encyclopedia of Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pa., 1930-1933, 4 vols. description ends ; TJ to MJR, 14 Jan. 1793; Maria Jefferson to TMR, 13 Jan. 1793, DLC; Sowerby, No. 1134 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

22 Joseph Anthony, Jr. (1762-1814), was a silversmith and jeweller at 94 Market Street (Harrold E. Gillingham, “Old Business Cards of Philadelphia,” PMHB , liii [1929], 210-12; Prime, Arts & Crafts, p. 85-7 description begins The Arts & Crafts in Philadelphia, Maryland and South Carolina, ed. Alfred Coxe Prime, New York, 1969, 2 vols. description ends ).

23 Samuel Clarkson was a merchant at 42 Union Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ; TJ to Clarkson, 2 Feb. 1793).

24 David Elder was a tailor at 24 South Fourth Street (Phila. Dir. 1791 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

25 John Parker, printer at 259 North Second Street, published only one number (Jan. 1793) of the Columbian Museum (Brown, Philadelphia Book Trade, p. 92 description begins H. Glenn Brown and Maude O. Brown, A Directory of the Book-Arts and Book Trade in Philadelphia to 1820, New York, 1950 description ends ; Mott, American Magazines, i, 31 description begins Frank L. Mott, A History of American Magazines, 1741-1850, New York, 1930, 2 vols. description ends ).

26 William Richardson made and sold mathematical and optical instruments at 75 South Second Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

27French miniature and portrait painter Jean Pierre Henri Elouis (c. 1755-1840) conducted a drawing school for young ladies at his residence, at this time located at 201 Arch Street (Prime, Arts & Crafts, p. 8-9 description begins The Arts & Crafts in Philadelphia, Maryland and South Carolina, ed. Alfred Coxe Prime, New York, 1969, 2 vols. description ends ).

28This was about half of the “superfluous furniture” which TJ did not need for his planned removal to a small house in the country and therefore was shipping to Monticello. On 9 Dec. 1792, acting on his determination to retire at the end of Washington’s first presidential term, TJ had given Thomas Leiper three month’s notice on his Market Street residence. He sold the furniture he considered unsuitable for Monticello and was packing the rest when, early in Feb. 1793, the complex pressures of politics and personal honor obliged him to defer the ardently desired return to private life (TJ to MJR, 26 Jan., 12 May 1793; TJ to Leiper, 9 Dec. 1792; TJ to Washington, 7 Feb. 1793). The contents of fifty-one boxes of furnishings sent to Monticello are itemized in TJ’s copy of Adrien Petit’s list, c. 12 May 1793, ViU.

29A Jacob Eninger is listed as a stocking weaver at 227 North Third Street in the city directory (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

30JWE was returning to Virginia (TJ to Francis Eppes, 7 Apr. 1793).

31 Francis Trumble (1716-1798), at the corner of Second and Shippen streets, was a leading Philadelphia craftsman who specialized in making and painting Windsor chairs (Hornor, Philadelphia Furniture, p. 73, 207, 237, 297 description begins William M. Hornor, A History of Philadelphia Furniture, Philadelphia, 1935 description ends ; Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

32The incoming tenant of 274 Market Street, Supreme Court Justice James Wilson (1742-1798), had allowed TJ to remain there a month beyond the expiration of his lease. For his temporary establishment in Philadelphia, TJ chose a three-room house surrounded by plane trees on the east bank of the Schuylkill River near Gray’s Ferry. Then about three miles from the city, it occupied a site within the block formed by present Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Reed, and Dickinson streets. For the five months that he remained in this country cottage, leased from 1 Apr. from Moses Cox, TJ paid $100 (TJ to Thomas Leiper, 11 Apr. 1793; TJ to Francis Eppes, 7 Apr. 1793; TJ to MJR, 7 July 1793; Jackson, Encyclopedia of Philadelphia, iii, 788-90, with illustration description begins Joseph Jackson, Encyclopedia of Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pa., 1930-1933, 4 vols. description ends ; TJ to Cox, 7, 12 Mch., 17 Sep. 1793).

33The three pipes of Termo wine of 1788 cost $255 and were sent to Monticello (TJ to John Bulkeley, 11 Oct. 1792; Bulkeley & Son to TJ, 7 Jan. 1793; James Brown to TJ, 10 Apr. 1793).

34This double-faced seven-day clock now hangs over the entrance to the Monticello house. Designed according to TJ’s specifications by Robert Leslie, it was made by Leslie’s apprentice Peter Spurck. TJ apparently had it temporarily installed in his house at Gray’s Ferry (Silvio A. Bedini, “Thomas Jefferson Clock Designer,” Procs. Amer. Phil. Soc., cviii [1964], 165-170; TJ to Moses Cox, 17 Sep. 1793).

35In 1792 French botanist André Michaux (1746-1802) had approached the American Philosophical Society with a plan for an expedition to the Pacific Ocean. TJ, pre-eminent in his interest in the Trans-Mississippi West and its exploration, drafted Michaux’s instructions and led the effort to finance the journey. Michaux was to receive one-fourth of the subscription money before his departure and the remainder on presentation of proof of reaching the Pacific. By the time Michaux left Philadelphia in July, the intervention of French minister Edmond Genet had displaced the scientific objectives of the Philosophical Society. When Genet’s political schemes miscarried, Michaux turned back, arriving in Philadelphia in mid-December (Malone, Jefferson, iii, 104-9 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends ; Jackson, Jefferson and the Stony Mountains, p. 74-8 description begins Donald Jackson, Thomas Jefferson and the Stony Mountains, Chicago, 1981 description ends ; Jackson, Letters of Lewis and Clark, ii, 667-72 description begins Donald Jackson, ed., Letters of the Lewis and Clark Expedition with Related Documents 1783-1854, 2d ed., Urbana, Ill., 1978, 2 vols. description ends ).

36 Martin Fisher was a “thermometer maker” at 76 Sassafras Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ; Dunlap’s American Daily Advertiser, 16 Dec. 1791).

37 Joseph Perkins was a Philadelphia gunsmith at 93 and 95 South Water Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

38 Benjamin Scull was a hatter at 181 Market Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

39 Michael Roberts was a merchant at 92 Market Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

40The son of Kaskaskia chief Jean Baptiste Ducoigne had been named for TJ when Ducoigne and his family had called at Monticello in the last days of TJ’s governorship in 1781. Ducoigne had been in Philadelphia from Dec. 1792 to May 1793 as part of a delegation representing seven Indian tribes. When the delegates formally met with President Washington in Feb. 1793, TJ was present and recorded the conversations (Papers, vi, 63-4 description begins Julian P. Boyd and others, eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Princeton, N.J., 1950- description ends ; Jackson, Jefferson and the Stony Mountains, p. 18-20, 71-4 description begins Donald Jackson, Thomas Jefferson and the Stony Mountains, Chicago, 1981 description ends ).

41The seal was for the Virginia High Court of Chancery, of which George Wythe was the chancellor (Hening, Statutes, xiii, 147 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ; TJ to Wythe, 14 Mch. 1791, 27 Apr. 1793).

42 John Dunwoody kept a tavern at the “Sign of the Spread Eagle” at 285 Market Street (W. A. Newman Dorland, “The Second Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry,” PMHB, xlvi [1922], 360).

43 Thomas Lapseley came into TJ’s service as coachman and in the fall was an office keeper at the Department of State.

44Correctly twenty-six. This chart and that at 8 July evidently record the number of persons who took the main meal at TJ’s house each day.

45TJ evidently boarded the French frigate Embuscade, which had arrived in Philadelphia on 2 May with a British prize, a merchant ship taken in American waters. The new French minister Edmond Charles Genet followed on 16 May. For TJ’s response to the difficult Citizen Genet and the delicate issue of neutrality raised by the capture of the Grange, see Malone, Jefferson, iii, 81-4, 90-113 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends .

46 Samuel Folwell (c. 1768-1813), who painted miniatures, operated a drawing school for young ladies at 51 South Third Street. The fee for instruction three half-days per week was eight dollars per quarter (Prime, Arts & Crafts, p. 9-12, 49-50 description begins The Arts & Crafts in Philadelphia, Maryland and South Carolina, ed. Alfred Coxe Prime, New York, 1969, 2 vols. description ends ).

47 Andrew Douglas was an ironmonger at 56 and 75 North Third Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

48On this date J. P. Blanchard repeated, with some variations, an experiment he had made on 5 June. From Blanchard’s rotunda behind Gov. Thomas Mifflin’s house on Market Street between Eighth and Ninth streets, several animals ascended in a hot air balloon and descended by parachute, coming to rest a few blocks away at the Friends’ Burial Ground at Fourth and Arch streets (Philadelphia General Advertiser, 17 and 19 June 1793; Jackson, Encyclopedia of Philadelphia, i, 219 description begins Joseph Jackson, Encyclopedia of Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pa., 1930-1933, 4 vols. description ends ).

49 Samuel Biddle of Elkton, Md., had come to Philadelphia to discuss with TJ his forthcoming position as overseer at Monticello. One of the first objects of TJ’s retirement from public life was the restoration of his long-neglected farmlands. He spent much of the summer immersed in the writings of Arthur Young and absorbing the advice of such practical farmers as George Washington and George Logan. To carry out his plans for crop rotation and other soil-improving practices, TJ sought overseers in Cecil County, Md., an area noted for good wheat-growing and grazing farms of the type TJ wished to have in Albemarle County. Perhaps his main objective in hiring farm managers from outside Virginia was to place the management of his slaves “on a rational and humane plan.” Through Jacob Hollingsworth of Elkton, TJ hired Eli Alexander and Biddle, who was overseer at Monticello from Sep. 1793 until Nov. 1794 at a salary of $120 per year (TJ to TMR, 18 Feb. 1793; Betts, Garden Book, p. 182-4, 190-204 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s Garden Book, ed. Edwin M. Betts, Philadelphia, 1944 description ends ).

50TJ, “making a collection of the best gazettes which have been published at the seats of the present general government,” had ordered a set of Thomas Greenleaf’s New-York Journal for the years 1789 and 1790 (Sowerby, No. 541 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ; Brigham, History, i, 656-8 description begins Clarence S. Brigham, A History and Bibliography of American Newspapers, 1690-1820, Worcester, Mass., 1920, 2 vols. description ends ).

51 Robert Patton was a bookbinder and stationer at 9 North Second Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

52On the Isle of Wight in 1789 TJ had asked Massachusetts shipmaster Edward Dowse to procure him a full set of Canton table china. TJ no longer needed it and the boxes were returned unopened to Dowse for resale (TJ to Dowse, 1 Apr. 1790, 26 July 1793; Dowse to TJ, 4 Mch., 29 Aug. 1793).

53On 29 July TJ was a pallbearer at the funeral of Mary Long (Mrs. Tobias) Lear, who according to TJ, had died of “a mortification of the bowels” brought on “by eating green plumbs and apples.” The procession moved from President Washington’s house at 190 Market Street to Christ Church cemetery at the corner of Arch and Fifth streets (Lear to TJ, 29 July 1793; TJ to MJR, 4 Aug. 1793; Stephen Decatur, Jr., Private Affairs of George Washington [Boston, 1933], p. 128-9; Pennsylvania Journal, 31 July 1793).

54Correctly £3–9–8.

55 John Barnes, listed in the directories as a grocer and tea merchant at 19 South Third Street, later became TJ’s financial agent (MB 23 Apr. 1795; Phila. Dir. 1793, 1794 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

56 David Jones was a blacksmith at 2 Coxe’s Alley (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

57 Thomas Lapseley was sent to Georgetown to exchange TJ’s riding horse Tarquin for a carriage horse TMR had purchased for TJ (TJ to MJR, 18 Aug. 1793).

58 Benjamin Bankson had been a clerk in the Department of State since June 1793 (Papers, xvii, 358 description begins Julian P. Boyd and others, eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Princeton, N.J., 1950- description ends ).

59“Memorandums for Mr. Bankson,” undated, is in DLC, at 15 Sep. 1793.

60TJ had planned to leave Philadelphia permanently at the end of September, but had been persuaded by the President to return to office until the end of the year after a visit to Virginia. By mid-September there was little point in keeping to his original departure date. The yellow fever epidemic, which in three months accounted for over 4,000 deaths, had driven off much of the population of Philadelphia, bringing business and government activity to a standstill and reducing TJ’s staff to one clerk, Benjamin Bankson (Malone, Jefferson, iii, 132-3, 140-1 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends ).

61TJ dined with John Spurrier, “an old English farmer” from Hertfordshire who kept the Queen of France tavern about six miles northeast of Wilmington, near present Claymont in New Castle County, Del. Spurrier published an agricultural work, The Practical Farmer, in 1793 and dedicated it to TJ (TJ to John Taylor, 29 Dec. 1794; TJ to Spurrier, 18 June 1793; Philadelphia General Advertiser, 2 July 1792; Traveller’s Directory, “Road from Philadelphia to Washington,” map 4 description begins S. S. Moore and T. W. Jones, The Traveller’s Directory, or a Pocket Companion: Shewing the Course of the Main Roads from Philadelphia to Washington, Philadelphia, 1802 description ends ; W.P.A. Writers’ Project, Delaware: A Guide to the First State [New York, 1938], p. 323-4; Sowerby, No. 702 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ). For an account of the public indignation over Spurrier’s tavern sign, which represented a decapitated female, see La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Travels, iii, 488-89 description begins Duc de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Travels through the United States . . . in the Years 1795, 1796, and 1797, London, 1799, 4 vols. description ends ; Spurrier was obliged to change the name of the inn, first to the Silent Woman and finally to the Practical Farmer, to satisfy the offended citizens.

62 Jacob Starck kept the Indian Queen tavern on the corner of Hanover and Baltimore streets, Baltimore. From 1796 it was kept by William Evans (J. Thomas Scharf, History of Baltimore City and County [1881, repr. Baltimore, 1971], p. 514).

63This figure does not include the cost of Maria’s gloves and Thomas and Jupiter’s expenses at Suter’s tavern for the horse exchange in early September.

64 David Watson’s first duties on his return to fulltime employment at Monticello—making wheels for TJ’s phaeton and various plantation vehicles—are outlined in TJ’s “Memorandums with respect to Watson,” ca. 25 Oct. 1793, DLC.

65The furniture TJ had shipped from Philadelphia was moved from Rocketts landing on Gillies Creek in Richmond to Daniel L. Hylton’s Belvidere (Ward and Greer, Richmond during Revolution, p. 4-5, 130).

66 Nathaniel Gordon (1763-1820) kept a “good tavern” at his residence about twenty miles northeast of Monticello at a crossroads which is now Gordonsville, Orange County (TJ to MJR, 3 June 1802; William Thomas, Gordonsville, Virginia [Verona, Va., 1971], p. 3-11).

67 Henry Gatewood kept a Spotsylvania County ordinary (Spotsylvania County Court Order Book 1795-1798, p. 212, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Spotsylvania, Va.).

68TJ “passed the day” at Chatham, William Fitzhugh’s home just outside Fredericksburg near Falmouth, Stafford County (TJ to Mann Page, 8 Dec. 1793; Waterman, Mansions of Virginia, p. 360-3, 415 description begins Thomas Tileston Waterman, The Mansions of Virginia, 1706-1776, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1946 description ends ).

69When TJ and James Hemings arrived in Germantown, the temporary seat of government, they found the town overflowing with refugees from the yellow fever epidemic. TJ had to be content with a bed in the corner of the public room of Bockius’ King of Prussia tavern at present 5516-20 Germantown Avenue. About 14 Nov. he moved to other quarters, not certainly identified but said by one chronicler to be in the house owned by Philadelphia mayor Matthew Clarkson at present 5275-77 Germantown Avenue. On 1 Dec. he returned to Philadelphia, taking rooms in the house of merchant Joseph Mussi at the corner of Seventh and Market streets. He lived in this apartment, decorated in the Italian style, and had the services of Mussi’s Italian cook until he left the city on 4 Jan. 1794 (Charles F. Jenkins, Jefferson’s Germantown Letters [Philadelphia, 1906], p. xiv-xv; Mussi to TJ, 28 Nov. 1793; TJ to MJR, 1 Dec. 1793; MB 4 Jan. 1794).

70TJ had not gone into Philadelphia by 17 Nov., so Lewis Gilliams, a dentist normally located in the city at 32 South Third Street, must have been in Germantown (TJ to Maria Jefferson, 17 Nov. 1793; Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ). TJ may have used “drawing” in the sense of promoting suppuration, as from an abscessed tooth.

71 Adam Franks was a hairdresser normally located at 8 North Eighth Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

72Two bushels of red clover seed for Monticello (TJ to Jacob Hollingsworth, 21 Nov. 1793; Hollingsworth to TJ, 24 Dec. 1793).

73After reading letters of English agriculturalist Arthur Young which had been passed on to him by George Washington, TJ determined to “push the number of sheep” at Monticello. The sheep procured in Augusta County by Archibald Stuart were brought to Monticello in early 1794 by Samuel Biddle (TJ to Washington, 28 June 1793; TJ to Stuart, 24 Nov. 1793, 26 Jan. 1794).

74 Robert Campbell was a bookseller and stationer at 54 South Second Street (Brown, Philadelphia Book Trade, p. 27 description begins H. Glenn Brown and Maude O. Brown, A Directory of the Book-Arts and Book Trade in Philadelphia to 1820, New York, 1950 description ends ).

75 George Weiss kept a tavern at 372 North Third Street (Phila. Dir. 1791 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

76This “short and light” plough bought from Dr. George Logan (1753-1821) was the model for all ploughs subsequently made at Monticello, and the type to which TJ attached his own moldboard of least resistance. In this year of preparation for a return to agricultural occupations, TJ often sought the advice of Logan, whom he considered “the best farmer in Pensylva. both in theory and practice.” Logan lived near Germantown at Stenton, at present Eighteenth and Courtland streets, Philadelphia (TJ to James Madison, 25 Mch., 16 Apr. 1810; TJ to TMR, 28 July 1793; Eberlein and Hubbard, Philadelphia, p. 183-96 description begins Harold Donaldson Eberlein and Cortlandt Van Dyke Hubbard, Portrait of a Colonial City: Philadelphia, 1670-1838, Philadelphia, 1939 description ends ).

77In response to TJ’s request in 1792 for the best red vin ordinaire for Monticello, Fenwick, Mason & Co. in Bordeaux had shipped 504 bottles of 1788 Médoc costing 1,008 livres (TJ to Joseph Fenwick, 10 Oct. 1792; Fenwick, Mason & Co. to TJ, 16 May 1793; TJ to Archibald Campbell, 18 Aug. 1793).

78In the 1780s Andrew Meikle in Scotland developed the drum and beater type of threshing machine which, with its modifications, has been the standard ever since. In 1792 TJ had asked Thomas Pinckney in London to have a model made of a machine of this type, about which he had read in Arthur Young’s Annals. The model, which was for a treble-geared machine to be powered by four horses, arrived in Virginia at the end of 1793. TJ did not have a machine based on it constructed until 1796, before which time all his wheat was threshed by horses on temporary treading floors in the open field. Although not the first in his area to have a threshing machine (William D. Meriwether at Clover Fields had one), TJ was characteristically progressive in his adoption and adaptation of an invention which did not come into general use outside Scotland until well into the nineteenth century. He eventually had three threshing machines at Monticello: two were portable and driven by horses and one was stationary and driven by water (Betts, Farm Book, p. 68-77 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s Farm Book, ed. Edwin M. Betts, Princeton, N.J., 1953 description ends ; Arthur Young, Annals of Agriculture [London, 1791], xv, 481-92; MB 5 Jan. 1796).

79The advertisement, which appeared in Philip Freneau’s National Gazette from 8 June to 27 July 1793, was for the sale of land in Amherst County, Va., belonging to John Nicholas, Sr. (John Nicholas, Jr., to TJ, [24-31] May 1793; TJ to Nicholas, 8 June 1793).

80 Isaac Price (d. 1798) was a watchmaker at 79 Market Street (Phila. Dir. 1793 description begins Philadelphia Directory, issued annually with varying imprints description ends ).

81 James Odier was associated with Bosquet & Brothers, merchants at 117 Front Street between Walnut and Spruce streets (Abraham Ritter, Philadelphia and Her Merchants [Philadelphia, 1860], p. 180).

82 Nathan Sellers, who had invented a method of drawing and annealing wire, sold woven wire products at the corner of Market and Sixth streets (Jackson, Market Street, p. 164-8 description begins Joseph Jackson, America’s Most Historic Highway, Market Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia, 1926 description ends ). TJ used screen doors at Monticello and there were screen doors on the President’s House in Washington when he occupied it (Nichols, No. 147, p. 111-12 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s Architectural Drawings, ed. Frederick D. Nichols, 4th ed., Charlottesville, Va., 1978 description ends ).

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