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You searched for: “War of 1812” with filters: Author="Madison, James"
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I have recd. with your letter of the 8th. the first Vol: of Genl: Armstrong’s "notices of the War of 1812" and offer my thanks for the politeness to which I owe it.
appointed him collector of the port of Burlington in 1813. After the War of 1812, Van Ness was selected as a member of the boundary commission established by the Treaty of Ghent to negotiate and fix the boundary between the United States and Canada. He was, successively, a member of the Vermont legislature...
). Joseph Gardner Swift (1783–1865), the first graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, was appointed second lieutenant in 1802. A veteran of the War of 1812, he rose to colonel and commander of the Corps of Engineers of the army, holding that position until his resignation from the service in 1818. He was surveyor of the port of New York, 1818–29, and...Encyclopedia of the War of 1812
...(1787–1837), the son of Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee of Revolutionary War fame, and half brother of Robert E. Lee, was a graduate of the College of William and Mary and a veteran of the War of 1812. He wrote a number of books, including two in defense of his father, and pamphlets and newspaper articles in support of Andrew Jackson’s presidential campaign.
Armistead Hoomes (ca. 1786–1827) was a Caroline County, Virginia, planter who served in the state militia as a captain of cavalry during the War of 1812, and in the state Senate, 1815–20.
...born in Stuttgart, Germany, and graduated from the University of Basel in Switzerland. He immigrated to the United States in 1803 and settled in Washington, D.C., where he taught music and languages. Mauro served in the War of 1812, after which he opened a business as an auctioneer. In 1830 he moved to St. Louis,
.... He served as judge of the state superior court for the western circuit of Georgia, 1803–9, and as U.S. senator, 1809–19, where he strongly supported JM and naval operations during the War of 1812. Tait helped secure the admission of Alabama to the Union in 1819, and after moving to the new state, was first federal judge of the district of Alabama, 1820–26 (Charles H. Moffat, “...
The Naval War of 1812: A Documentary History
1795–1801, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1822–29. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, commanding the American troops at the Battle of Queenston in 1812. He was known for his devotion to agricultural, educational, and philanthropic causes in New York, including the founding of the Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute (
...law in Zanesville, and was appointed state marshal by Thomas Jefferson in 1806. He served as a colonel in the Ohio militia, and was later made a brigadier general in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. In 1813 JM appointed him governor of Michigan Territory, a post he held until 1831, when he became secretary of war. He was U.S. minister to France, 1836–42, U.S. senator from...
...Harrison (1773–1841) served in the U.S. Army, 1791–98, as secretary of the Northwest Territory, 1798–1800, and as governor of the Indiana Territory, 1800–1813. During the War of 1812 Harrison was commissioned a brigadier general and given command of the army of the Northwest. He was promoted to major general in March 1813. In October of that year Harrison’s troops secured a victory at the...
LeRoy Opie (d. 1819) was a veteran of the War of 1812 and served as U.S. Army paymaster for North Carolina and Virginia (
...since their boyhood days at Donald Robertson’s school, Taylor found JM’s politics to be insufficiently Republican and opposed his candidacy for president in 1808 as well as the War of 1812. A writer on political and agricultural topics, Taylor served as president of the Virginia Society for Promoting Agriculture and delivered his presidential address in 1818. James Mercer Garnett (1770...
in the War of 1812. JM appointed him a commissioner of the Navy Board in 1815, where he served until late 1822. He resided at Meridian Hill in Washington, D.C. He was commander of the West Indian squadron, 1823–25,
...and emigrated to the United States in 1783. He made a fortune in the fur trade and invested his profits in New York City real estate. He was instrumental in floating the 1814 loan in support of the War of 1812, and after JM’s death, Astor loaned money to Dolley Payne Madison, holding a mortgage on her Washington home. At his death he was deemed the richest man in America (Mattern and...
...John Coffee (1772–1833) was born in North Carolina and moved to Tennessee, where he conducted a series of small businesses and became a friend of Andrew Jackson. He served as commander of cavalry under Jackson in the War of 1812 and afterwards moved to Alabama (Sam B. Smith et al., eds.,
For Joy’s letters to JM and his other political writings during the War of 1812, see
...American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving in the Continental Congress, 1776–78. A lifelong Federalist, Carroll supported the U.S. Constitution, represented Maryland in the U.S. Senate, 1789–92, and opposed the War of 1812.
...he practiced law and launched a political career in which his anti-tariff and nullification views eventually propelled him to the U.S. Senate, 1833–42. His uncle, James Patton Preston (1774–1843), a veteran of the War of 1812 who was severely wounded at the Battle of Chrysler’s Farm, served as governor of Virginia from 1816 to 1819 (
authorizing payments for various types of property lost in the War of 1812 was approved on 3 Mar. 1817 (
: RG 59, War of 1812 Papers, Misc. Letters Received concerning the Release of Prisoners.
U.S. Army in the War of 1812
edition of the above work stating that it had been “prepared and committed to the press” prior to the conclusion of the War of 1812; that it “would have been difficult, even if it were desirable, to withold” it from the public; and that a refutation of the accusations brought against the United States government was “necessary, in peace as much...
For the Prince Regent’s 9 Jan. 1813 statement blaming the United States for causing the War of 1812, see U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
: War of 1812 Collection).
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,Naval War of 1812,
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
: War of 1812 Manuscripts);
59, War of 1812 Papers, Correspondence regarding Passports). In 59, War of 1812 Papers, Correspondence regarding Passports). In a 28 July 1814 letter to Monroe, Attorney General Richard Rush had given his opinion that under “An Act to prohibit the use of licenses or passes granted by the authority of...
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
Naval War of 1812,
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
...five of the wounded were black marines from a corps of at least two hundred escaped slaves trained under Adm. Sir George Cockburn in May 1814 on Tangier Island (Cassell, “Slaves of the Chesapeake Bay Area and the War of 1812,”
Naval War of 1812,U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
Heidler and Heidler, War of 1812
59, War of 1812 Papers, Misc. Letters Received concerning the Release of Prisoners; Clift,
Naval War of 1812,
U.S. Army in the War of 1812,
Naval War of 1812
Naval War of 1812Naval War of 1812
The Naval War of 1812: A Documentary History
Naval War of 1812
59, War of 1812 Papers, Correspondence regarding Passports), conveying JM’s request that Taylor obtain permission from Admiral Sir John Borlase Warren for Lee, “in whose welfare the President takes much interest,” to travel to the West Indies; Lee to...
: RG 59, War of 1812 Papers, Agreements for Exchange of Prisoners of War).
...1779–1820) entered the navy in 1798 as a midshipman. He rose quickly through the ranks and for his efforts in the Tripolitan War was rewarded with a captain’s commission in 1804. Decatur’s major achievement during the War of 1812 was the capture of the
Naval War of 1812
), in which JM recalled his “Talk” to “deputations from a number of tribes to the seat of Govt.” at the commencement of the War of 1812.