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You searched for: “United States; and France” with filters: Recipient="Madison, James"
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, 2:636), stating that he had again raised these questions with the French, had been rebuffed, and had dropped the issue lest it lead to estrangement between the United States and France, and because he did not wish to give Joseph Bonaparte, a supporter of the United States, a reason to withdraw that support. He said he appended a letter showing Joseph’s view of the matter and he rejected...
, 5:118–19; “Statement Showing the Payments of Awards of the Commissioners Appointed under the Conventions between the United States and France …,”
The law which suspended the commercial intercourse between the United States, and France and her dependancies having now expired,
“An act further to suspend the commercial intercourse between the United States and France, and the dependencies thereof,” which extended the law then in force until 3 Mar. 1801, passed the House on 20 Feb. 1800 by a vote of 68 to 28 (
Naval Documents Related to the Quasi-War between the United States and France
...During difficult circumstances, good citizens should not change their leaders, and good leaders should not give up the reins of government. Greatly misses Joel Barlow, who could have been most useful to the United States and France. Tried to do homage to his memory in the society of which DuPont is one of the vice presidents, and where he does his part to admit citizens of the United States...
Gerry referred to the Quasi-War between the United States and France (
That matters remained in this situation until the convention and Treaty were successively made between the United States and France, in the Years   ,Left blank in Tr. The writers referred to article 4 of the Convention of 1800 between the United States and France, and to the Louisiana Purchase Claims Convention of 1803 (see
United States and France
Adams in his address to Congress on 8 Dec. promised that “the course of the transactions in relation to the United States and France, which have come to my knowledge during your recess, will be made the subject of a future communication.” But it was not until 18 Jan. that Elbridge Gerry’s diplomatic correspondence was released to Congress. That same......the United States and France,...
...’s plan for “a fresh attempt at negotiation,” called for a “mutual spirit of conciliation,” and advocated the removal of “inequalities” that might have arisen in relations between the United States and France due to the “operation” of treaties. The House debated it for a week. Robert Goodloe Harper opposed the amendment, arguing that France, once convinced of America’s firm resolve to resist...
“commercial intercourse between the United States and France, and the dependencies thereof.” The House passed the bill on 1 June and the Senate six days later, but with amendments. Agreed to by both Houses, it was sent to President Adams on 13 June (
...s preamble made it clear that the legislation was aimed at the French, who were capturing American ships near the coast in violation of the law of nations and treaties between the United States and France. A motion on 23 May by North Carolina Senator Alexander Martin to have the preamble expunged was defeated by a 7 to 16 vote. An attempt to postpone the bill until word was received of the “...
In July 1798 Rutger Jan Schimmelpenninck, the Dutch minister to France, approached Talleyrand and Elbridge Gerry with an offer by the Batavian Republic to serve as mediator in the dispute between the United States and France. On 23 Aug. William Vans
A bill “to suspend the commercial intercourse between the United States and France” was reported by Samuel Sewall on 30 May. It was debated and passed by the House on 1 June by a vote of 55 to 25; after passage in the Senate, it was signed into law 13 June...
United States; and France [index entry] 
was “positively excluded, by both the letter & spirit of the 4th. & 5th. Arts.” of the Convention of 1800 between the United States and France. For the articles, see
Naval Documents Related to the Quasi-War between the United States and France
...and those in U.S. vessels and that the British legislature was considering a similar law. He urged Talleyrand to examine “the alterations that will be made between the relative situation of Great Britain, the United States and France by the reciprocal repeal of discriminating duties by the two former, while they continue to burthen and impede the activity of commerce between the two...
...in that special case, but in that only. The war with England was declared, without any concert or communication with the French Government; it has produced no connection between the United States and France, or any understanding as to its prosecution, continuance, or termination. The ostensible relation between the two countries, is the true and only one. The United States have just...
...relations between it and the United States, enclosing their correspondence with Cevallos, and suggesting that if the French still refused to change their position he should have Purviance or Erving notify the British of the differences emerging between the United States and France. The other enclosures are copies of Cevallos to Monroe and Pinckney, 24 Feb. 1805 (16 pp.; cover marked “
...enclosing their 8 Mar. reply to him (see n. 1 above), that if Spain would not accede to the U.S. position, it would be because of French support which would disrupt relations between the United States and France; (10) Monroe to Armstrong, 17 Mar. 1805 (5 pp.), enclosing an extract from Cevallos’s 14 Mar. 1805 letter to Pinckney and Monroe (see n. 1 above), repeating many of the...
...I had the honour to receive your letter of the eighteenth of March, by which I am informed that it is the President’s pleasure that I set off for Paris to exchange the Ratifications of the Convention between the United States and France, and to settle the ulterior points connected with that subject.
...me with the brig, it would not have been much worse.” He also said that Francis Sargent had died in the marine hospital at Rochefort on 9 Feb. 1806. Under the terms of the 1831 treaty between the United States and France, $17,049 was awarded in compensation for the
, XI, 51–54), but if the legislators considered other matters pertinent to the proposed consular convention between the United States and France, they may have concluded that the statute of 24 December 1779 “for the protection and encouragement of the commerce of nations acknowledging the independence of the United States of America” covered the subject adequately (
...our commerce, as indicative of an indisposition on her part to perform that duty which was stipulated in her intercourse with the United States by her accredited Minister. And that unless a speedy accommodation of the controversy between the United States and France should take place, that letters of Marque and Reprisal ought to be granted against her cruisers.
...honor to inform You that several American vessels have arrived here within a short time past in consequence of the opening of the intercourse, between the United States and France. The whole of the Convention hath not yet arrived officially to this Government, but only the fourth & Seventeenth Article’s, which have been adopted & promulgated by the Governor General & copies thereof sent...
The Convention of 1800, between the United States and France, existed at the time of my arrestation, and during eleven months after. In it provision is made, that our Citizens shall enjoy in France for their Trade, negotiations & Swan referred to the sixth and eleventh articles of the 30 Sept. 1800 convention between the United States and France (
...said the French commissary at Charleston had informed him of the incident, and that he had already taken steps to obtain satisfaction for the violation of the convention between the United States and France. JM added that the president had weighed the memorialists’ observations about the protection necessary for the port and would “promote such measures as the nature of his functions,...
had most of the cargo thrown overboard and the ship refloated. Under the 1831 treaty between the United States and France, $2,965.50 in damages was awarded (ibid., 59–60).
These expressions which you consider as an explicit and positive acknowledgement of the right of the United States and France to enter into the engagements which they afterwards did, do not in my opinion weaken in any manner the foundation and the force of the representations which I have had the honor to make to you against the sale...