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You searched for: “United States; and France” with filters: Recipient="Madison, James"
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, XI, 51–54), but if the legislators considered other matters pertinent to the proposed consular convention between the United States and France, they may have concluded that the statute of 24 December 1779 “for the protection and encouragement of the commerce of nations acknowledging the independence of the United States of America” covered the subject adequately (
...’s plan for “a fresh attempt at negotiation,” called for a “mutual spirit of conciliation,” and advocated the removal of “inequalities” that might have arisen in relations between the United States and France due to the “operation” of treaties. The House debated it for a week. Robert Goodloe Harper opposed the amendment, arguing that France, once convinced of America’s firm resolve to resist...
...s preamble made it clear that the legislation was aimed at the French, who were capturing American ships near the coast in violation of the law of nations and treaties between the United States and France. A motion on 23 May by North Carolina Senator Alexander Martin to have the preamble expunged was defeated by a 7 to 16 vote. An attempt to postpone the bill until word was received of the “...
A bill “to suspend the commercial intercourse between the United States and France” was reported by Samuel Sewall on 30 May. It was debated and passed by the House on 1 June by a vote of 55 to 25; after passage in the Senate, it was signed into law 13 June...
“commercial intercourse between the United States and France, and the dependencies thereof.” The House passed the bill on 1 June and the Senate six days later, but with amendments. Agreed to by both Houses, it was sent to President Adams on 13 June (
United States and France
Adams in his address to Congress on 8 Dec. promised that “the course of the transactions in relation to the United States and France, which have come to my knowledge during your recess, will be made the subject of a future communication.” But it was not until 18 Jan. that Elbridge Gerry’s diplomatic correspondence was released to Congress. That same......the United States and France,...
In July 1798 Rutger Jan Schimmelpenninck, the Dutch minister to France, approached Talleyrand and Elbridge Gerry with an offer by the Batavian Republic to serve as mediator in the dispute between the United States and France. On 23 Aug. William Vans
“An act further to suspend the commercial intercourse between the United States and France, and the dependencies thereof,” which extended the law then in force until 3 Mar. 1801, passed the House on 20 Feb. 1800 by a vote of 68 to 28 (
Naval Documents Related to the Quasi-War between the United States and France