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Spring House tavern was on the Ridge Road in present-day Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pa., about sixteen miles from Philadelphia. Albrick Bird owned the house in 1773....operated a ferry on the Schuylkill River at his plantation in Providence Township, Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., where the post road that ran through Germantown, Plymouth, Norrington, and Providence crossed...
Edward Bartholomew (1736–1802), who previously had owned the Sign of the Buffalo Tavern near Montgomeryville, Pa., operated tanneries in present-day Montgomery County, Pa., and after 1779 in Philadelphia. GW sent troops on 24 Jan. 1778 to secure leather in the vats at Germantown, nearly resulting in an engagement with British patrols (see
Jacob Auld (1727–1793) was appointed excise collector in Montgomery County, Pa., under the state on 6 May 1785 (
In Montgomery County, Pa., a few miles north of Philadelphia.
Plymouth Quaker Meeting House was located in Plymouth Township in what is now Montgomery County, Pa., about fourteen miles northwest of Philadelphia.
The Presbyterian meetinghouse in Abington Township in Montgomery County, Pa., was at the village of Abington, also called Morestown, on the York Road about fourteen miles northeast of Philadelphia.
Daniel Hiester, Jr. (1747–1804), of Upper Salford Township in Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., was the son of Daniel Hiester, Sr. (1713–1795), of Reading, Pennsylvania. The junior Hiester served as colonel of the 1st Regiment of Philadelphia County militia in 1777 and, having returned from Canada unscathed,...
Samuel Wheeler of Montgomery County, Pa., signed a contract for lanterns at Bald Head Island in the Cape Fear River of North Carolina and Tybee Island, Ga., on 23 April (
For the trial of Matthew Tyson of Upper Dublin Township in what is now Montgomery County, Pa., see the
Frederick Bicking (1730–1809) of Lower Merion Township in what is now Montgomery County, Pa., had been active as a papermaker as early as 1761. Bicking was also a regular supplier of paper to Congress for currency and bills of credit.
Hickorytown in Plymouth Township, Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., is about three miles southeast of Norristown on the Manatawny Road, near the Plymouth meetinghouse, and about fifteen miles northwest of Philadelphia.
Paleske emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1784, and was appointed Prussian consul to the U.S. in 1791. By 1797 he settled in Montgomery County, Pa.: Thompson Westcott,
Providence Township, Montgomery County [Pa.]
Gulph Mill was a gristmill dating from 1747 on Gulph Creek in the eastern part of Upper Merion Township, Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., about six miles southeast of Valley Forge.
Montgomery County, Pa. [index entry] 
Lower Salford Township in Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., is on the northwest side of Towamencin Township, where GW’s headquarters was located at this time.
Andrew Wood owned a plantation in Roxborough Township, Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., near where Ridge Road crossed present-day Roxboro Avenue.
18[Diary entry: 22 July 1787] (Washington Papers)
: Spring Mill was an old grist mill on the east side of the Schuylkill River, about two miles below Conshohocken in Montgomery County, Pa. It was powered by the combined waters from several springs in a small area. The diary of Peter Legaux, a French immigrant who lived near Spring Mill, has the following entry for this date: “This day Gen...
..., Pa., about twenty-five miles north of Philadelphia. Edward Bartholomew operated a tavern, which was known before the war as the Sign of the Buffalo, near Montgomeryville in present-day Montgomery County, Pa., about twenty-five miles northwest of Philadelphia at the intersection of the roads from Coryells Ferry to Lancaster and from Bethlehem to Philadelphia. Montgomery Baptist Meeting...
20[July 1787] (Washington Papers)
: Spring Mill was an old grist mill on the east side of the Schuylkill River, about two miles below Conshohocken in Montgomery County, Pa. It was powered by the combined waters from several springs in a small area. The diary of Peter Legaux, a French immigrant who lived near Spring Mill, has the following entry for this date: “This day Gen...
North Wales was a village in Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., about ten miles east of Pennypacker’s Mill and about three miles northeast of the Skippack Road.
22General Orders, 9 October 1777 (Washington Papers)
GW established his headquarters on 8 Oct. in Towamencin Township, Philadelphia (now Montgomery) County, Pa., at the farmhouse of Frederick Wambol (Wampole) about a mile northwest of present-day Kulpsville, and he remained there until 15 Oct. when Wambol signed a receipt acknowledging payment of £28.5.4 for various provisions...
23General Orders, 30 October 1777 (Washington Papers)
The Gwynedd Quaker meetinghouse, dating from 1712, was located in central Gwynedd Township in present-day Montgomery County, Pa., about twenty miles northwest of Philadelphia and a mile west of the village of North Wales. A return of 24 Nov. signed by William Shippen, Jr., indicates that there were 159 sick and recovering soldiers at...
Perkiomen Township is in present-day Montgomery County, Pa., about eight miles northwest of Swede’s Ford. Perkiomen Creek enters the Schuylkill River from the north a short distance above Valley Forge.
25[Diary entry: 13 May 1787] (Washington Papers)
Col. Samuel Miles (1739–1805), of Montgomery County, Pa., who had served in the Braddock expedition, was commissioned colonel of the state’s rifle regiment in 1776 and later served as auditor, quartermaster, and brigadier general of state forces. In 1790 he was elected mayor of...
26[Diary entry: 21 January 1790] (Washington Papers)
Daniel Hiester (1747–1804), a Montgomery County, Pa., businessman, served in the Pennsylvania militia during the Revolution and as a member of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, 1784–86. Hiester served as congressman from Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1796, when he moved to Hagerstown...
27January 1790 (Washington Papers)
Daniel Hiester (1747–1804), a Montgomery County, Pa., businessman, served in the Pennsylvania militia during the Revolution and as a member of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, 1784–86. Hiester served as congressman from Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1796, when he moved to Hagerstown...
...to the south. At Church Hill the Skippack Road joins the Bethlehem Road and turns south to join the Reading Road at Chestnut Hill. Gabriel Shuler, who was a tax collector for Lower Salford Township in what is now Montgomery County, Pa., lived about a mile west of Skippack Creek on
29General Orders, 19 June 1778 (Washington Papers)
, 1). Dr. Robert Shannon (d. 1795), a physician who lived near Norrington (now Norristown in Montgomery County, Pa.), had been arrested in December 1777 under suspicion of having provided aid to the enemy, but by this time he apparently had been cleared of wrongdoing.
Andrew Porter (1743–1813) of Montgomery County, Pa., was commissioned captain of a company of marines in June 1776 and became a captain in the 2d Continental
31[May 1787] (Washington Papers)
Col. Samuel Miles (1739–1805), of Montgomery County, Pa., who had served in the Braddock expedition, was commissioned colonel of the state’s rifle regiment in 1776 and later served as auditor, quartermaster, and brigadier general of state forces. In 1790 he was elected mayor of...