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In Complyance with your Request, I have considered of what you proposed, and am obliged to give you my Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men, Such, whose Judgment and Integrity may be most relyed on. I mean the Committee on the State...
In Complyance with your Request We have considered of what you proposed to us, and are obliged to give you our Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men; Such, whose Judgment and Integrity, may be most rely’d on; the Committee on the State...
As your Excellency has asked my Opinion of General Lees Plan, as explained in his Letter of the fifth instant, I think it my Duty to give it, although I am obliged to do it in more Haste than I could wish. I Suppose the only Questions which arise upon that Letter are whether the Plan is practicable; whether it is expedient; and whether it lies properly within your Excellencys Authority,...
It gives me the most sensible Pleasure to convey to you, by Order of Congress, the only Tribute, which a free People will ever consent to Pay; the Tribute of Thanks and Gratitude to their Friends and Benefactors. The disinterested and patriotic Principles which led you to the Field, have also led you to Glory: and it affords no little Consolation to your Countrymen to reflect, that, as a...
The Bearer of this Letter Francis Dana Esqr. of Cambridge, is a Gentleman of Family, Fortune and Education, returned in the last Packett from London where he has been about a Year. He has ever maintained an excellent Character in his Country, and a warm Friendship for the American Cause. He returns to share with his Friends in their Dangers, and their Triumphs. I have done myself the Honour to...
The Congress having thought proper to appoint us to the Board of War and Ordinance, we do ourselves the Honour to transmit you the foregoing Extracts from their Proceedings establishing a War Office for the more speedy and effectual Dispatch of military Business. You will percieve, on Perusal of the Extracts, that it will be necessary for you forthwith to furnish the Board with an exact State...
As Congress have authorized your Excellency to send a proper Officer to take the Command in the northern Department; We take the Liberty to signifie to your Excellency that in our Opinion, no Man will be more likely; to restore, Harmony, Order and Discipline, and retrieve our Affairs in that Quarter, than Majr. Genll. Gates. He has on Experience acquired the Confidence, and stands high in the...
We the Senate of the United States, return you our sincere thanks for your excellent speech delivered to both Houses of Congress; congratulate you on the compleat organization of the federal Government, and felicitate ourselves and our fellow-citizens on your elevation to the Office of President: an Office highly important by the Powers constitutionally annexed to it and extremely honorable...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble Opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an Association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
Among the Candidates for the Honour of public Employment; under the new Government there is one, whose connection in my family, and public relation to me, in the late legation to St. James’s Would render my total silence on his account, liable to misinterpretation, as proceeding, either from want of esteem, confidence, or affection for him on the one hand, or to a failure of rispect to the...
The inclosed letters are from two as respectable characters as any in Massachusetts, containing information which I hope has been transmitted to you, through other channels. But as it is possible, it may be otherwise, it is my duty to lay them before you, which I beg leave to do by the bearer Colo: Smith. With all possible deference and respect I have the honor to be, Sir your / most obedient,...
Address of the Senate of the United States to the President of the United States in answer to his Speech— We the Senate of the United States return our thanks for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress. The accession of the State of North Carolina to the Constitution of the United States gives us much pleasure; and we offer you our congratulations on that event, which at the same...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
At twelve o’clock the Senate attended upon the President of the United States at his own House, when the President of the Senate delivered the following Address. To the President of the United States of America. We receive, Sir, with particular satisfaction the communications contained in your Speech, which confirm to us the progressive State of the public Credit, and afford at the same time,...
The Senate of the United States have received with the highest satisfaction the assurance of public prosperity contained in your Speech to both Houses: the multiplied blessings of providence have not escaped our notice or failed to excite our gratitude. The benefits which flow from a restoration of public and private confidence are conspicuous and important and the pleasure with which we...
Captain John of Harvard in the Massachusetts, has been recommended to me, by so many respectable characters, and in such handsome terms, that I cannot refuse his request of a Line to the President of the United States in his favour. He has the merit of long and early Services, though he is said to have been lately unfortunate. As his application is entirely out of my Department, and to a Judge...
At twelve o’Clock, agreeably to appointment, the Senate waited on the President at his House and presented the following Address. Accept, Sir, the thanks of the Senate for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress at the opening of the session. Your reelection to the chief magistracy of the United States gives us sincere pleasure. We consider it as an event every way propitious to the...
Resolution of the Trustees of the. Sinkg. Fund. At a Meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund on the thirtieth day of May 1794. Present, The Vice President of the United States, The Secretary of the Treasury, The Secretary of State, The Attorney General. The Secretary of the Treasury having informed the board that there was in the Treasury the sum of one hundred thousand Dollars to be...
We receive with pleasure your speech to the two Houses of Congress. In it we perceive renewed proofs of that vigilant and paternal concern for the prosperity, honor, and happiness of our country, which has uniformly distinguished your past administration. Our anxiety arising from the licentious and open resistance to the laws in the western counties of Pennsylvania, has been increased by the...
The inclosed Letters No. 6. 7. 8 and 9, especially the last, contain Information of so much Importance that, although they are written in great confidential Freedom from a Son to a Father, I think it my Duty to transmit them to you. I beg the favour of having them returned to me at your Leisure by the Post. The unnatural Effervescence against the Treaty which broke out in Boston has made...
It is with peculiar satisfaction that we are informed by your Speech to the two Houses of Congress, that the long, and expensive war in which we have been engaged with the Indians North west of the Ohio, is in a situation to be finally terminated; and though we view with concern the danger of an interruption of the peace so recently confirmed with the Creeks, we indulge the hope, that the...
We thank you, sir, for your faithful and detailed exposure of the existing situation of our country; and we sincerely join in sentiments of gratitude to an overruling Providence for the distinguished share of public prosperity and private happiness which the People of the United States so peculiarly enjoy. We are fully sensible of the advantages that have resulted from the adoption of measures...
I have this morning received, with great Pleasure, the Letter you did me the Honor to write me, on the Seventeenth of this month. Although a Visit to the City of Washington would give me great Pleasure, and chiefly for the opportunity it would afford me of paying my Respects at Mount Vernon; Yet I cannot but consider the execution of the Plan, as very uncertain. I thank you, Sir, for your...
Mr Mc Henry the Secretary at War, will have the honor to wait on you, in my behalf to impart to you a step I have ventured to take, & which I should have been happy to have communicated in person, if such a journey had been at this time in my power. As I said in a former letter, if it had been in my power to nominate you to be President of the United States, I should have done it, with less...
I received, Yesterday the Letter you did me the Honor to write me on the 25th. of September. You request to be informed, whether my determination to reverse the order of the three Major Generals, is final.—and whether I mean to appoint another Adjutant General without your Concurrence.—I presume, that before this Day you have received Information, from the Secretary at War, that I some time...
Although I received the Honor of your Letter of the first of this month in its Season, I determined to postpone my Answer to it, till I had deliberated, on it, and the Letter from Barlow inclosed in it, as well as a multitude of other Letters and Documents official and unofficial, which relate to the Same Subject, and determined what Part to act. I Yesterday determined to nominate Mr. Murray...
[ New York ] April 20, 1776 . The return is headed: “A Return of the Colony Company of Artillery commanded by Alexander Hamilton April 20th, 1776” and is in the form of a table showing the number of each rank present and fit for duty, sick, on furlough, on command duty, or taken as prisoner. Hamilton’s company contained a total of 69 commissioned and noncommissioned officers. AD , George...
paid at Christiana for family’s breakfast, horses &c.— £6.5  paid on the road from thence to Wilmington for lodging &c— 6.   paid for breakfast the morning we crossed brandywine— 1.12 pd.  1.12 15.9  Received the above from Capt Gibbs ADS , Hamilton Papers George Washington Papers , Library of Congress. Town on creek of same name, which flows into the Delaware near Wilmington. I.e.,...
I lodged last night in the neighbourhood of New Windsor. This morning early, I met Col: Morgan with his corps about a mile from it, in march for Head Quarters. I told him the necessity of making all the dispatch he could so as not to fatigue his men too much, which he has promised to do. I understood from Col: Morgan that all the Northern army were marching down on both sides the River, and...
I arrived here yesterday at Noon and waited upon General Gates immediately on the business of my mission; but was sorry to find his ideas did not correspond with yours for drawing off the number of troops you directed. I used every argument in my power to convince him of the propriety of the measure, but he was inflexible in the opinion that two Brigades at least of Continental troops should...
I arrived here last night from Albany. Having given General Gates a little time to recollect himself I renewed my remonstrances on the necessity and propriety of sending you more than one Brigade of the three he had detained with him, and finally prevailed upon him to give orders for Glover’s in addition to Patterson’s brigade to march this way. As it was thought conducive to expedition to...
I have been detained here these two days by a fever and violent rheumatic pains throughout my body. This has prevented my being active in person for promoting the purposes of my errand, but I have taken every other method in my power, in which Governor Clinton has obligingly given me all the aid he could. In answer to my pressing application to General Poor for the immediate marching of his...
I arrived at this place last night and unfortunately find myself unable to proceed any further. Imagining I had gotten the better of my complaints while confined at Governor Clinton’s & anxious to be about, attending to the march of the troops, the day before yesterday I crossed the ferry in order to fall in with General Glover’s brigade which was on its march from Poughkepsie to Fish Kill. I...
There are still existing in the army so many abuses absolutely contrary to the military constitution, that, without a speedy stop is put to them, it will be impossible even to establish any order or discipline among the troops. I would, therefore, propose the following Regulations; submitting to His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief, to distinguish such as may be published under his own...
[ Valley Forge ] January 29, 1778. Receipt for payment of $100 by Washington to Hamilton for Hamilton’s expenses at Morristown. DS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
To His Excellency George Washington Esquire, General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of America. We, the Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency, “to confer, determine and agree upon a Treaty and Convention, for the exchange of Prisoners of War, and for all matters whatsoever, which may be properly contained therein” beg leave to report— That in pursuance of Your...
To His Excellency George Washington Esquire General and Commander in chief of the Forces of the United States of America. We the Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency, “to confer, determine and agree upon a Treaty and Convention for the exchange of Prisoners of War, and for all matters whatsoever which may be properly contained therein,” beg leave to report— That, agreeable to Your...
Hopewell Township [ New Jersey ] June 24, 1778 . The council decided against a general action against the British. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The questions asked of the council are printed in GW John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The Writings of George Washington (Washington, 1931–1944). , XII, 115–17.
We have halted the troops at this place. The enemy, by our last reports, were four miles from this (that is their rear) and had passed the road which turns off towards South Amboy, which determines their rout[e] towards Shrewsbury. Our reason for halting is the extreme distress of the troops for want of provisions. General Wayne’s detachment is almost starving and seem both unwilling and...
The result of what I have seen and heard concerning the enemy is, that they have incamped with their van a little beyond Monmouth Court House and their rear at Manalapans River abt. seven miles from this place. Their march to day has been very judiciously conducted—their baggage in front and their flying army in the rear, with a rear guard of 1000 men about 400 paces from the main body. To...
Inclosed I transmit your Excellency a letter from the Count Destain. He has had the River sounded and finds he cannot enter. He will sail for Rhode Island tomorrow evening; in the mean time he is making demonstrations to deceive the enemy and beget an opinion that he intends to operate in this quarter. He would sail immediately but he waits the arrival, or to hear, of a frigate which carried...
I wrote to your Excellency the evening of the 20th. by Major Neville. I remained in the neighbourhood of Black Point ’till the afternoon following. The Count had received his expected dispatches from Congress and was to sail, as I mentioned before, the first fair wind. At Brunswick yesterday, Mr Caldwell joined me. He was immediately from the Point and brought intelligence that the fleet got...
Report of Lieutenant Colonels, Robert Hanson Harrison & Alexander Hamilton Commissioners &ca. To His Excellency General Washington— We, the Commissioners appointed by your Excellency for the purposes specified in the powers to us given on the 30th of November last—Beg leave to Report— That in pursuance of your instructions, we repaired to Amboy on Monday the 7th instant at 11 oClock; where we...
We are honored with two letters from Your Excellency of the 10th. and 21st to the contents of which we beg leave to assure you of our strictest attention. That of the 18th. is not yet come to hand, it is not improbable it has gone round by Lewis Town, which has occasioned the delay. Col Hamilton wrote to your Excellency from Philadelphia acquainting you with our arrival there and our intention...
[ Great Egg Harbor Landing, New Jersey, November 1, 1779. On November 8, Brigadier General Du Portail and Hamilton wrote to Washington : “We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant.” Letter of November 1 not found .]
We last night received the honor of Your Excellency’s letter of the 25th. of October; on the 26th. we had the pleasure of advising you fully of our situation and motives for coming to this place. We have since received no further intelligence of the Count, his operations, or ultimate intentions; on which account and from the late period of the season, we have given over all expectation of any...
Your Excellency’s letter of the 30th. of October reached us yesterday. We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant. We have received no late advices from the Southward, which confirms us in the ideas of our last. Major Lee will no doubt have communicated to Your Excellency what he mentions to us, that the enemy are preparing at New York for...
[ Cranes Mills, New Jersey ] January 13, 1780 . Does not think that attack on Staten Island will be successful, but leaves final decision to Washington. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
On our present plan, It appears to me the quantity of ammunition proposed by General Knox for the Artillery is insufficient. A larger consumption may be necessary. The Stone house, in which the enemy may attempt to defend themselves may be obstinate and we should have it in our power by the severity and duration of our fire to bring them to reason. I take the liberty to suggest these matters,...
Cranes Mills [ New Jersey ] January 14, 1780 . States that attack on Staten Island will be made at daybreak on following day. Requests Washington to send axes, ammunition, and an eighteen pounder. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.