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    • McHenry, James
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    • Washington, George
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    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="McHenry, James" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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Once more at home, and I flatter myself recovered from the fatigues of your journey. You have witnessed on your route the great affection and attachment of the people and the sound part of the community, which is still visible in every company I go into, and which I am persuaded will not diminish, though the external marks of it may gradually be less strongly expressessed. This is the least...
I have received to-day your letter of the 3d inst. which contained the agreeable account of your safe arrival at home, and the objects with which you are surrounded. I am not sorry to hear that you have found so immediate employment; for altho’ I wish the hammering business was over and the smell of the oil gone I do not think either so great an enemy to happiness as having nothing to do. I...
Yesterday Mrs Murray Mr Murray and Mr Dandridge left this City for Amsterdam. Mr Dandridge had reced your letter on Saturday. He has left a thermometer with me for a post in Jersey. It is a present from you, but what is the name of the post, and where does he live? I believe in my hurry I have not detailed the facts to you respecting Gen. Pinckney as particular as I ought. The principal are as...
I think it probable that there will be a house of representatives to-morrow and perhaps a Senate on tuesday, the speech of course will be on Wednesday. The speech will state the circumstances which have induced to the call of Congress; express a sincere desire that accommodation may take place; inform, that a fresh attempt will be made to endeavour to effectuate the object; recommend in the...
I have been very much occupied since I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 29th of May, and even now am very far from being a man of leisure. From the late events in Europe, there is ground for beleiving that England will be forced to accept of terms of peace, unless indeed France inebriated with victory, should require cessions which even the spirit of opposition would revolt at....
You will hardly stand in need of the inclosed paper to convince you of its writers principles altho’ it may be necessary as a proof of his criminal intentions. It is to be laid before Congress to-day. There are some circumstances that would induce a belief that there is more of French in the plot than British; altho’ Chisholm actually had conversation last winter with the British minister on...
Yesterday after hearing councel the Senate expelled Mr Blount. Mr Tazewell voted against his expulsion upon very frivolous ground. The affair makes a good deal of noise I mean talk without the plot or project being understood. You will see by the inclosed reports to the President the further disclosure of French projects. It would seem as if nothing short of a dismemberment of the union, and...
I was too much hurried with business before leaving Philada to answer your last letter of the 14th of Augt and since my arrival here I have had a bilious fever, and more business than if I had remained in Philada, according to which reasoning I ought not to answer it now. The fact is I perhaps should have suspended the pleasure a little longer, if I had not received to-day the enclosed letter...
I have been for a long time past so hurried and so loaded with business as not to have a moment which I could devote to private correspondence. This is not an apology for neglect or indolence. I am exceedingly sorry it is true, because I foresee, it may without some change become quite unsupportable. Enjoy your happy situation; or if it is to be disturbed, let it be only by transient domestic...
I have received this moment your letter of the 28th ulto. The land business being with Mr Wolcott I shall give him the letters and see that they are forwarded by to-morrows mail and the inquiry aluded to made of the Deputy Surveyor if found. Munroe’s memoir has been little read and has made no converts to his party. He has I think sunk in the public opinion. Fauchets publication has done no...