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    • Morris, Gouverneur
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Documents filtered by: Author="Morris, Gouverneur" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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I take the Liberty of addressing your Excellency upon a Subject so much out of my own Line, that I must be entirely in your Equity, as to the Charge of Impertinence. I hope to be acquitted. The Committee of Safety have ordered, that the sick Soldiery should be transported to an Island called little Barn Island; which was, and perhaps still is, the Property of Captn John Montresor, an Engineer...
I expected before this to have written to you “Provision is made for the American Officers” but that Thief of Time Procrastination hath kept it off from Time to Time. The Question is now an Order of the Day and as such takes Place of every other Business When it will be determined I know not but this I know that it shall be finished one Way or the other before any Thing else Let what will...
Knox is to attend the Council. Conway hath resigned & his Resignation is accepted. The Affairs of the Army are necessarily delayed by the foreign Affairs which have broken in upon us. As to the Half Pay Matters stand thus the Questions have been carried but by an Entry on the Minutes there is an Agreemt that a final Question shall be put whether it be finally determined in Congress or sent to...
Permit me to congratulate you on the passing a Resolution for a Kind of Establishment at this late Hour It is not what you wished but it may do You must pardon a little to the Republicanism of our Ideas. What is a little extraordinary there was no Dissentient State and only two Individuals Yet no Measure hath ever been more severely contested. We shall now go thro the Regimental & other...
We are going on with the regimental Arrangements as fast as possible and I think the Day begins to appear with Respect to this Business. Had our Saviour addressed a Chapter to the Rulers of Mankind as he did many to the Subjects I am perswaded his Good Sense would have dictated this Text. Be not wise overmuch. Had the several Members who compose our multifarious Body been only wise enough Our...
I wrote you a few Days ago by Colo. Johnson; as he is not yet gone, I will now add two Things I forgot to mention then. The first is that if you send any General to Rhode Island you will probably find it most convenient to get rid of Varnom, Whose Temper and Manners are by no Means calculated to teach Patience Discipline & Subordination. Congress having determined on the Affair of the...
I have sent to your Addressé three Bundles containing the several Materials collected by the Committee for arrangg the army. This Business being now put under your Care I trust you will be enabled speedily to put your Army in the Situation you wish excepting always the Deficiency of Numbers which is upon the whole well enough since thereby it happens that less of the Resources of the Country...
I was in your Debt. It is my Fate always to be so with my Friends. But beleive me my Heart owes Nothing. Let me add that you can do me no Favor so great as to comply with your Wishes except an Opportunity to serve the Public which indeed is your highest Wish as you have evidenced fully to all the World & particularly to your Friends. I feel the full Force of your Reasoning. The Faith of...
I wrote you a Letter long since which went backwards & whether it hath ever Yet got so far forwards as to reach you I am utterly incapacitated even to guess trusting however that you have got or will get it I shall not from Memory repeat what if there at all is at best but faintly traced. At present I trouble you on the Subject of recruiting your Army which is at this Moment in Debate before...
I received your Favor and return you Thanks for it. The Conduct which the Enemy may pursue with Relation to us is not quite decided But I have not a Doubt but their Efforts during the next Campaign will be chiefly towards our Frontiers with a View to weary us into Submission. At the same Time they will perhaps endeavor to keep such Posts in our Country as to render the Communications tedious...
As Congress have delegated to a Committee, of which I have the Honor to be a Member, the Superintendance of the Commissary & Quarter Masters Departments; this, together with our Finances which we have long been cobling at, hath obliged me to consider in a more compleat View the State of our Affairs than my former detached Attention would permit, or indeed than my natural Indolence would have...
You will excuse in me the Liberty I have taken in requesting Colo. Morgan to call on you. That Gentleman can give you much and important Information relative to the State of our Western Frontiers. From the first View of the Commander in that Department at York Town he struck me as one of those who excel in the Regularity of Still Life from the Possession of an indolent Uniformity of Soul. The...
You must permit me most heartily to congratulate you upon the very important Intelligence which Monsr Gerard will confidentially communicate to you. It is and indeed ought to be a Secret even from Congress for which I need give you no Reasons as you are but too well acquainted with them. Measures have already been taken for obtaining the necessary Supplies which the Minister will detail to...
Two Days ago I was placed on a Committee to report the necessary Provision to be made for Officers not heretofore provided for. I recollect at present the general Officers & Erskine’s Corps (The Surgeons are already reported & the Report set down for this Day when as the Devil will have it I cannot attend) but as it would produce many Inconveniences to make this Provision which Congress intend...
I to write a Letter if I you to excuse. If I am rightly inform’d of the Situation of the Enemy the Next Embarkation will not leave above 6.000 Men in New York. Supposing this to be the Case I will go on to suppose that the french Troops with 2.000 Militia are thrown upon Long Island and march Westward. That you move down with 10.000 Men to the Neighbourhood of Kings bridge and at a proper...
We arrived here yesterday a few Minutes after twelve. The british Commissioners have not yet appeared. We learn that Letters have gone forward to your Excellency from the british General and Admiral. We shall set off from home this Day, and wait your farther orders in the Vicinity. Colo. Skinner will forward them. We have the Honor to enclose an English Paper of the third of January, by which...
We received your Excellency’s Letter of the fourteenth this Morning, previous to the Receipt of which we had written to you by Lieutenant Blair of the Jersey Line. We have written to Sir Henry Clinton, of which the enclosed is a Copy, and sent it with another to the Officer commanding on Staten Island requesting him to facilitate Mr Skinner’s Passage to New York, whom we have instructed to...
We did ourselves the honor to write to your Excellency from Elizabeth-Town on the 16th instant, after which, we concluded it necessary to retire from thence, as some people might have been induced, from a suppos’d neutrality, to have had improper communications with the Enemy. Mr Skinner proceeded to New-York on that day, but from bad weather was not able to return untill the 20th. We have...
Colo. Smith delivered your Excellency’s Letter of the twenty eighth, between four and five Yesterday Afternoon. You mention having had Intimations, that under the Idea of the Cessation of Hostilities a Number of People intend to come over from New York to our Lines, and express your particular Desire that no Persons coming from the Enemy may be permitted to Land, except the Commissioners and...
General Forman (who is now on his way to you with a Representation on the Hanging of Captain Hoddy by the Refugees) will have the Honor of delivering your Excellency this Letter. Previous to the Generals Arrival we had heard of this Matter altho not so particularly. We mentioned it to General Dalrymple and Mr Elliott. They seemed to be surprised and wounded at the Information & assured us of...
As it is probable that our report of this date may after having been transmitted to Congress come before the public eye, we have thought it best to give in a distinct letter the information which it may be unnecessary or improper to publish. Your Excellency will perceive that we had no proper oppo rt unity of bringing forward distinctly the affair of Mr Laurens. By pushing it abruptly into...
Enclosed is a Packett containing two Weeks News Papers for Genl Dalrymple—They are sent in Consequence of an Agreement we made at Elizabeth town being a cartel of Gazettes—We were to send out the New York Papers—these we want for the Use of the Office and had in Vain attempted to get them thro the Commissary of Prisoners. He promised very fairly—Should Genl Dalrymple send out the News Papers...
I received your Excellency’s Favor of the eighteenth Instant last Evening. I pray you to accept my most grateful Acknowledgements for this mark of Approbation and Confidence. As the Enemy appear to be desirous of doing Justice the Meeting about to take Place will I trust be under better Auspices than the former. It may perhaps be successful. Nothing would give me greater Pleasure than to...
In Consequence of a very interesting Conversation which has passed between Mr Ogden and myself, I have advised him to wait upon you. He will deliver this Letter. How far what he has to communicate may merit Attention you can best determine. I confess that I think it very important. Believe me always very sincerely yours PHi : Etting Collection.
I take the Liberty of introducing to your Acquaintance Mr Darby a young Gentleman of family from England—He comes hither with warm Recommendations from our Ministers abroad and as far as may be determined from a very short Acquaintance is a Man of fashion who has kept the best Company—His Object is to see America and his first Excursion is to see you. Believe me very truly yours DLC : Papers...
I write this Letter as a Companion for some Shoes of Miss Bassett and if it is addressed to you rather than to her you must for that Trouble as well as many others accuse that Celebrity which you had no little Trouble in acquiring. But you must tell the Lady that I am far from thinking that she ought not be as much celebrated as any General among you. Indeed between ourselves I think she will...
Shortly after your Departure from this Place, I went to my Farm and returned hither last Sunday Evening. Living out of the busy World, I had Nothing to say worth your Attention, or I would earlier have given you the Trouble you now experience. Altho not very inquisitive about political opinions I have not been quite inattentive. The States Eastward of New York appear to be almost unanimous in...
Enclosed with this you will receive two Books which I recd some considerable Time since at Richmond; but being then about to depart for this Place, brought them hither in the Hope of an Opportunity to send them direct to Mount Vernon. Failing in that Expectation, I now put them in the Office; as I recollect you will not have to pay the Postage which otherwise would be worth at least as much as...
I cannot prevail on myself to omit the present Occasion of offering my Respects, altho I have Nothing to say which is worth your Perusal. It may not however be quite unsatisfactory to receive even Conjecture on a Subject whose Importance is great and whose Situation precludes Evidence. As far as one who avoids much Enquiry can judge I am led to decide that the Opposers to the new Constitution...
After many unforeseen Delays I am about shortly to take my Departure from Philadelphia for the Kingdom of France and expect to visit both Holland and England. When I desire to be favored with your Commands it is not the meer ceremonious Form of Words which you every Day meet from every Man you meet and which you know better than any Man to estimate at its true Value. Whether I can be useful to...