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Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 28 June 1757. On 30 June 1757 GW wrote to Lee: “I have received yours of the 28th instant.”
In Obedience to His Honr The Presidents orders to me wch I inclose you a Copy off. I have Sent One hundred Men of this Militia Commanded by Capt. Thos McClanahan & Capt. William Tebbs to Garrison Fort Loudoun at Winchester. I have directed them to Apply to you for Arms & Ammunition & to the Commissary for Provisions: the arms sent for the Use of this County Not being yet Arrived. I am Sir Your...
We are informed by Doctor William Savage that You became Security for Mrs Margeret G[r]een in a bond to Fairfax Court as the Law directs for the Administration of the Estate of the late Revd Mr Charles Green deced which Administration being vested in the said Savage We at his desire do hereby become Counter Security to you and do Oblige ourselves our Exrs and Admrs in the same Penalty and as...
On receipt of your Excellency’s letter directing the cavalry to halt, the corps were billeted in the vicinity of Chester-town. Your lettr of the 8th inst. reached us on the 9th in the afternoon—The Troops moved at three oclock, & arrived here this morning. We mean to halt & refresh for a few hours & then pursue our route to springfield—Your Excellency will please to favor me with your orders...
This evening the Enemy’s cavalry made an attempt on my advanced post - opposite the Stone brid g e—they were in force & moved with vigor & judgement. I am happy in informing you, they were baffled in their attempt by Capt. Furman & Lt Armstrong with their partys of Infantry—the enemy had one killed & several wounded—We have suffered no loss at all. I was unfortunately at that moment with the...
I have had variety of intelligence from the enemy this day—none very pointed or material—But it is of such a tenor, that I am firmly of opinion you will hear of Genl Clintons being before West point in less than 48 hours. Be pleased to excuse this laconic note, it proceeds from the anxiety I feel—I will be more full tomorrow if requisite—this wind is very fair—I am very affcy your Excllys h:...
I wrote your Excellency this morning, Since which I have acquired more explicit knowledge of the enemy’s preparation in Bergen Woods. They certainly may be expelled the country. Perhaps they may be made prisoners. It would give peace to the inhabitants for twenty miles around & very much assist agriculture. Scarce a night passes but ten or twelve horses are stolen. Another good consequence...
I examined the country directed by your Excellency yesterday. I find a position most convenient for an army on the road by Captain Marsailles to Col. Deys. Having passed Marsailles house one mile, you arrive at the junction of the Paramus & Deys road. Here commences the position I allude to, & continues along Deys road. A very copious branch of water runs close to the camp in front—smaller...
Admiral Greave has most certainly arrived with six sail of the line & is now joined with the fleet under Admiral Arbuthnot before the hook. This communication I presumed would have been made to your Excly by Gen. Furman, during whose presence in this county I conceived no intelligence from me was expected. That my business here was to expedite his dispatches to collect provisions for the F r ....
I addressed your Excellency yesterday advising of Admiral Greaves arrival. I omitted mentioning a report prevalent here from the enemy, viz. that Monsieur Ternay had fallen in with the British squadron, had sunk one seventy four & had taken one sixty four—this is said to have happened off Cape Henry. I transmit a very exact list of the British fleet. They have received 3000 marines from N....
I have the honor of your Excellys letr of the 19th. I conceivd it a matter of delicacy in communicating with H. quarters, unless advised so to do by Gen Forman to whom the business had been committed. But Sir this matter is now done away & I shall do every thing in my power to execute your Orders. Our situation here is disagreeable & perilous for want of Infantry. Disagreeable because we...
I informed your Excelly in my advice of yesterday that the British fleet after playing off & on had returned to port on the 18th. They sailed again in the evening & night of the same day; bearing their course southerly. On the 20th in the afternoon, some were seen on their return; from this, it was concluded the whole Fleet were following. But three frigates only reached the hook this Morning....
Since my last the B. fleet has returned to their station off Sandy hook & again sailed. It is said that the Cork fleet is daily expected; if so, probably, the maneuvres of the navy are designed to cover them. I have the honor to be sir with the greatest respect your Excllys most ob. h. servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Admiral Arbuthnot after many maneuvres off & on has at length moved with his fleet towards Rhode-island & Sir Henry Clinton is preparing to push up the sound with an army. I have recd your Excllys let. of the 24th. I shall arrange matters here, & commit the execution of them to Capt. Rudulph, & prepare my route to Easton. I hope my orders may meet me there, as I wish to expedite the business,...
The moment I had fixed Captain Rudulphs business in Monmouth county, I proceeded to this town; where I am waiting for my orders. I have the honor to be with perfect respect Your Excellency’s most obt h. Sert DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I huve returned from the business committed to my directin by your Excellency & am so far on my route to join the army. Captain McLane with his Infantry has come up. The fatigue of the troops has induced me to halt for a few days to refresh them. Your Excellency will please to direct whether this halt shall be long or short. I huve the honor to be with perfect respect your Excellys most obt...
My Corps reached Slotterdam yesterday evening, where they halt this day. In the mean time I have hurried to Camp to receive your Excellencys orders for the disposal of them, on their arrival here. I gave orders to Gen.. Rudulph to deliver Mr Andersons horse to him. The horse is gelded & Mr Anderson refuses him. When I left Monmouth I directed Capt. Rudulph to be under the guidance of Gen....
I have the pleasure to inform your Excelly that enclusive of sixty waggon load of forage sent in yesterday, we have I flatter myself two days fresh meat for the army. Col. Blains instructions pointed out the stock of sheep at Newark as proper to cull on this emergency. I accordingly detached a party to procure a part of them. The people assembled determined to rescue their property by arms....
It is with very great regret I enclose your Excellency Cap. McLanes letr to me soliciting leave to retire from the service. The public looses a valuable servant, & I part with a gentleman of the first to my corps. I have the honor to be sir, with the most perfect respect your Excelys obt servt DLC : Papers of George Washington. When I left my private concerns, and accepted of a Commission in...
I have engaged two persons to undertake the accomplishment of your Excellency’s wishes. In my negotiation I have said little or nothing concerning your Excellency as I presumed it would operate disagreeably, should the issue prove disastrous. the cheif of the two persons is a sergeant in my cavalry. To him I have promised promotion, the other is an inhabitant of Newark; I have had experience...
I have the honor of your Excellency’s letr of the 3d inst. transcribing a complaint exhibited by the Chief Justice of this state against three officers of my corps. the following is the exact state of the matter. When illegible to Monmouth, I posted a party of horse in the vicinity of Brunswic for the speedy communication of intelligence. The inhabitants on whom they were quartered being...
I have made it my business to see the person who was Capt. Browns guide. from a minute examination of him I am confident that Gen. St Clair was named to deceive, that Capt. Brown did not see or hear from Gen. St Clair, & that Capt. Brown passed himself on his conductor as a person engaged in our service, altho his object was to communicate with some gentleman of consequence among us—I am apt...
I waited on Col. Dey yesterday, but received no information favorable to the business you was pleased to charge me with. On my return last evening the Marquis mentioned to me the same matter as very eligible, & Col. Hamilton made some enquiry on the same subject. I communicate this to your Excellency, least a mention of it by those gentlemen to you may alarm you, on the score of secrecy. Be...
I have just returned from Newark, where I Completed the business your Exccelly committed to me. The virtuous serjeant deserted last night, I saw the two in newark this day. This night they go to york. Desertion among us is a a stranger; my officers are very attentive, & some of them men of nice discernment, this leads me to apprehend they will discover that the Serjeant is on some secret...
My friend got safe into Newyork. He was before Sir Henry Clinton & has passed all the forms of the garrison. He accidentally met Col. Arnold in the street which has paved a natural way for further acquaintance. The party entertain high hopes of success; I fear their patience will be exhausted; therefore am of opinion it ought to be expressed on their minds at every meeting. I informed Mr...
I am very sorry to trouble your Excellency on any matters of mine or of my friends, as I well know the little leisure of your station. but as the case to which I beg leave to call your Excellencys attention for a moment involves in it similarity those of hundreds of your officers, I trust it will sufficiently apologize for me. Your Excellency must recollect, that while in the northern army my...
It is with Particular Pleasure I communicate to you that the General Assembly have Appointed a Committee of both Houses, to present to you an Address Expressive of the high Sense they entertain of your Singular Services and Merits, in the late Glorious revolution. a Copy of Which the Committee have directed me to inclose and to Announce to your Excellency, their intention of Waiting upon you...
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 15 Nov. 1784. On 18 Nov. Lee wrote to GW : “I did myself the pleasure of writing to you on the 15th.”
I have Sent you by your Servant 2½ bushels of the Naked Italian Barley wch will be Enough for your ground as it branches much I never Sewed it very thick; it requires Strong Land, & never grows tall, has a thick Stem & large luxuriant heads, wch hangs near the Earth, and if Cut there is a great waste of the grain in harvesting; therefore I have it pulled up by the hand, and as it is a rear...
I have Sent you by my Servant One bushel of Italian forward black eyed Peas they were first brought into this Country by Mr Madza on James river they are the best Sort of Pea of the kind. I am Sorry to hear you have an Attack of the Rheumatizm I have been Severely afflicted with it, this Winter & Spring tho’ I am now able to ride out—otherwise I should have paid my respects to you at Mount...
The day after you left Alexa., I wrote to Mr Richard Lee in Richmond, requesting him to examine Docr Skinners papers for the pattents & to forward them to me. I have not received his reply. Mr Fendal is not yet decided whether he will go to Barbadoes or to Norfolk—Mrs Fendals situation is more & more precarious & perhaps Mr Fendal will judge it adviseable to proceed directly to the islands. I...
It is probable I may take Magnolio in one or two days & send him to So. Carolina. Then let me ask the favor of your furnishing me with his pedigree & age certified & your bill of sale. The lands I pay for him I estimate at 50£. Since I saw you, I have hear’d that Mr John Page offers for the Westd district. This event will render it necessary for me to decline, otherwise the election may take...
If you please, send off Magnolio tomorrow to be delivered to Mr W.A. Lee who lives at his mothers four Miles below Stafford Court-house —It is performable in one day if the horse starts very early. you will be so good as to have him shod & to direct that he wears his cloaths—for the cold weather will injure his appearance, otherwise. I enclose you my bond, as I beleive it will not be in our...
It would give me great pleasure to wait on you tomorrow, but Mrs Lee situation p(revents) it. She is reduced as low nearly as e(ver) by violent attack of the former s(ickness) which continued for 3 days & nights wi(th) occasional intervals. I will communicate your invitation to Mr Lee &c. The bill of sale is reed, & Magnolio safely delivered agreable to my request for which I beg to return my...
Inclosed you have the patents for the land sold to you. I have Doer Skinners deed with me which is recorded in the general court, therefore when you please my conveyance can be made —It is my custom to convey only with special warrantee viz. against me & all claiming under me—this I hope will be satisfactory to you—the title I have not the smallest doubt of, should you think differently I will...
I am willing to guarantee the land as you may choose, provided you will agreable to the spirit of our bargain secure my payment for the horse in Kentucky lands, should those sold to you prove insecure or doubtful in title. You have alone or in conjunction with Mr Lewis a tract of land near Suffolk, which if you incline to sell I shall be glad to negotiate for. I must trouble you to forward to...
Too often am I obliged to intrude on your time, which I assure you I very reluctantly do, as I well know how much the business of others avocate your attention from your own concerns. But the importance of the business which I wish to receive your aid in, I hope will be deemed in some degree an apology. Mr Madison & myself have determined to make sale of part of our joint property at the great...
I am most thankful my dear General for your transmission of this day—the mode you have adopted, is certainly unexceptionable, & the information you communicate will doubtless answer our wish, which is to acquaint our friend in Europe from the most respectable source, of the advantages of the scite at the great falls. Permit me however to add, that I cannot conceive it possible for the most...
I shall leave your deed with Mr C. Lee, after having procured the most probable attendants on the general court, to witness it (of which he will be one). As the hour is at hand, when you must again leave your country & my departure this evening or tomorrow prevents my bidding you adieu in person, I beg leave now to offer my most sincere wishes for the continuation of your health and for...
Altho the exalted station which your love of us and our love of you has placed you in, calls for change in mode of address, yet I cannot so quickly relinquish the old manner. Your military good holds its place in my mind notwithstanding your civic glory, & whenever I do abandon the title which used to distinguish you I shall do it with awkwardness. The affectionate and decided regard...
We have been all again made most miserable by the accounts received of the desperate state of your health—True it is that the general gloom has been succeeded by joy in as much as we have just heard that you was safe & likely to be restored to your usual vigor. But when I recollect that in the course of a few months you have been twice dangerously ill, & am informed by all who have seen you of...
As one who asks no employment but will accept of it, if public considerations should make his service proper do I now address You. We have heard of a defeat of the Western Army & popular clamour is loud. If the events of war should render a change in the command of your troops necessary, & you should consider me equal to the charge, such is my miserable condition from the vicissitude attendant...
Permit me to tell you that I have waited to the last moment in my power in the fond hope of seeing you. My necessitys force me away this day, or the satisfaction I covet, should not be lost. Deprived of what is so grateful to my feelings, I must use this mode of manifesting my happiness on your second return to our native state, on the confirmed health you enjoy, and on the lasting affection...
Altho the enclosed account which came to hand yesterday is by no means complete, yet I think it worthy of transmission, as I am sure you will be very anxious to receive every additional information on the late disaster in the west. The writer I am told is entitled to full credit—We may I think truely infer from this communication that the enemy paid dearly for their victory, or General St...
I do myself the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th instant, which will be communicated to the general Assembly. In the confidence that the most recent accounts of the action of the 4th of November would be acceptable, I transmitted a letter addressed to me by Captain Rogers detailing the events of that day, as represented in Kentucky when he left the District. By a...
I do myself the honor to transmit herewith a Resolution of the General Assembly with respect to certain Lands located by the Officers and Soldiers of the Virginia line under the Laws of this Commonwealth, and since ceded to the Chickasaw Indians, together with a Report of a Committee of the House of Delegates on the same subject. Permit me Sir, to express my hope that some general regulations...
Richmond, Va., 16 Feb. 1792. Transmits an extract of a letter from Mr. Taylor, one of the commissioners of the marine hospital at Norfolk, Virginia. LS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , Vi : Executive Letter Book. The enclosed extract has not been found. On 8 Dec. 1791 James Taylor sent Gov. Henry Lee a statement of the accounts of the commissioners of the marine hospital at Norfolk,...
Richmond, 16 April 1792. Transmits a “copy of a letter sent to me by Colonel Arthur Campbell of the county of Washington as it may perhaps convey information useful to you.” LB , Vi : Executive Letter Book. The original enclosure has not been found, but it was most likely Arthur Campbell’s letter to Lee of 2 Mar. 1792 that reports: “Some indication of resistence seems to be given in the S. W....
When I was in Norfolk I heard of your passing thro Baltimore on a visit to Mt Vernon, and flattered myself with being enabled to pay my respects to you, but on my return I heard of your departure for Philada. This happiness I must hope for on a future day. In the mean time permit me to occupy a few moments of your time. You cannot have forgotten a declaration which you made at your own table...
I beg leave to make known to You the bearer hereof Mr Williams a portrait painter. This gentleman is an American citizen, is of good character and is considered as possessing great natural talents in his line. Of the last fact I am too inadequate a judge for to venture my own opinion. He has a singular solicitude to be permitted to take your portrait and therefore has asked from me a letter of...