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Mr Custis presented me with yr letr last night. Be assured I shall offer you no property not clear in title unless I may be imposed on, to prevent which am I here daily engaged in exploring the truth. I have a tract of land near gunston recd from W. Steptoe at valuation for money lent to him some years past. this I propose to offer among other property all of which will be submitted to you...
I find myself fatigued with my journey or should wait on you this evening. While in Newyork I mentioned to a friend of mine there your pair of horses & price—He has authorized me to buy them, money to be paid (1000 Ds.) on delivery. I promised to write to him by tomorrows mail, & consequently must ask your decision this evening. Please to present my best respects to Mrs Washington & tell her...
General Lee returns herewith the paper which the President was pleased to give to him last evening—He has derived great pleasure from its perusal and presents a complete refutation of all the charges exhibited agst govt by Mr adet & breathes throughout a spirit of moderation & friendship which ought to produce the happiest effects. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I had the honor this moment to receive from the mail just arrived (Interrupted by the vast fall of rain) your l[ett]er of the 11th. My anticipation of the necessity of information to you On the point trusted to me, induced me to expend my own money to secure to my letr a timely reply—th[e] substance was instantly forwarded to you, which I hope reached you soon after your ler of the 11th was...
In my last I told you that I had contrived to get an unsuspected private friend to hire an express to carry a le[tte]r from me to Mr. H. as I found waiting for private conveyances too tedious. I have this moment reced his reply, after expressing himself very anxious indeed, to evidence (especially at the present crisis) by some public act his attachment to you & after declaring his sense of my...
Till very lately have I felt myself well enough to discharge my daily dutys & now hardly fit for writing—But your letr (without date) recd last evg as well as my constant desire to administer to your information so far as I can, induces me to sieze the first opportunity of replying. Mr H. was written to by me in a way to obtain his answer by a direct opportunity which was presented in the...
Least the official transmission of the resolutions mentioned in my last may have been delayed, I have thought it expedient to enclose to you the journals which comprehend the proceedings on the last resolution —The first in effect the same took place in our disposal of the James river shares. When you see that resolution you will find that your disposal of the potomac shares is approved & that...
When I reached this place which was as soon as my necessary call at home would permit I gave your letr to Mr Lee who replied to it by the succeeding post affirmatively as I understand. You will have heard of the curious resolutions which had passed the house of delegates—the object of which is too plain to doubt—with all proper dispatch they have been attended to by those who considered them...
I was early this morning my dear President with Col. H[oward] & he called on me Just now. I had I thought good ground this morning to conclude that he would accept your call. Now I fear he will not—I beleive his state of health which he says can with difficulty be kept tolerable by freedom from business, & daily exercise is his cheif objection—He will write to you in a few days from Annapolis...
I am to receive in the course of next month Judge Wilsons bonds payable in one & two years to the amount of your demand for your dismal swamp lands. If you will take your original price thus payable I will purchase—my enquiry respecting the Judges affairs leaves not a doubt in my mind of his ability & I had full conviction from a recent transaction of his honor & integrity. Most respectfully...
A report from Norfolk announcing the arrival of a corvette there, with letters of recal of the French minister in consequence of our treaty with G. Britain is circulating with much confidence. I cannot think so illy of the wisdom & justice of the french republic as to credit the tale & in my own mind I class it among those daily inventions which charecterize the agitators of our country: yet I...
The horse I mentioned to you is not of the sort you want: tho a well looking horse. I wished to have heard your sentiments on the constitutionality of a treaty made by the P. & senate wherin commerce was regulated in some degree—on this point I see not the way so clear, as I wish. If you have leisure I should be happy in hearing from you thereupon. I learnt from Mr L. that Mr Allen formerly...
It was a long time before I had an opportunity of making known to Mr Henry the purport of that part of your letr to me which concerns him. But very lately have I received his reply, which I beg leave to enclose for your perusal. I am very confident that Mr H. possesses the highest & truest regard for you & that he continues friendly to the g. government, notwithstanding the unwearied effects...
Major Morgan who acted in capacity of aid de camp with me during the expedition placed under my direction will have the honor to present this letter. He is a most amiable youth & I am persuaded worthy of your polite attention. I beg leave therefore to solicit it in his behalf & to recommend him as perfectly qualified from the part he has taken with the army to give to you information on any...
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, c.3 Nov. 1794. On 3 Nov., Alexander Hamilton wrote GW, “A letter from Governor Lee which goes with this probably informs you of the plan of future operations.”
Altho I have had near two days to reflect on the purport of the letr received from the secretary of the treasury on the first instant, I confess I am not yet releived from the agitation of mind produced by that communication. My greif for the necessity of pointing the bayonet against the hearts of our countrymen is equalled only by my conviction of the wisdom of your decision to compel...
Pardon me for again writing to you in so short a time—I always do it with reluctance, because I know your time occupied constantly with momentous concerns. But the present crisis seems pregnant with very eventful issues. the public mind is on the [stretch]. Love of order is the dominating principle, & hatred to draw blood from fellow citizens weighs—the opinions of the minority of Congress are...
your late orders for a detachment of militia & proclamation give birth to a variety of sensations & opinions. All good citizens deplore the events which have produced this conduct on your part, & feel but one determination to maintain inviolate our happy government at the risk of their lives & fortunes—there are some among us from the influence of party spirit & from their own ambitious views...
I consider myself very fortunate in arriving here at the same time that you did as I shall have the unexpected pleasure of seeing you. Presuming that your stay will be short & knowing how much you will be engaged in your farm business, I beg leave to ask what day this week will be most convenient for you to be seeen & to present the most sincere respects of your devoted & affec: friend I have...
I informed the Secretary of War since my arrival, that I should devote all the leisure I might have in examining the Western part of the Chesapeake and Hampton-Road, with a view to the preparing for you authentic information on points which, in case of war, will probably engage your attention. I have so done, but my time has not admitted of the minute examination I wished; still I believe my...
This evenings post from Norfolk has brought information of the arival of a french fleet in Hampton Road with much european intelliga[n]ce. My letr from Col. Newton I think proper to enclose (having not time to prepare a copy) that you may be possesd of the most accurate information on the subject, within. I have the honor to be with unceasing affection & perfect respect your ob: st ALS , DNA :...
Some time ago on a rumour that the collector for the rappahannock district was about to decline his office I took the liberty to bring to your view Mr Francis Brook as a gentleman extremely well qualified in my opinion for that office. I mentioned then the reasons which influenced my judgement & inclination, & will not now detain your time by a repetition of them. Persuaded you will consult...
you will suppose I apprehend that I am rather too solicitous for your possession of the aid of art in threshing out your crops of wheat, when the moment I have understood that the wheat mill will not be adopted by you, I should renew your attention to this subject by informing you, that two english farmers have just arrived here with a model of the machine invented in scotland for threshing...
The letter which you did me the honor to write to me dated 21st July got to hand just as I was departing for Winchester, from which place I am late returned. To this cause is to be attributed cheifly the lateness of my reply, tho my wish to have known with accuracy the mind of my country men relative to those matters which were beginning to agitate the community, would of itself have induced...
Plain & evident as is the wise policy of neutrality on the part of the U. States during the present European war, I find that, the papers teem with publications reprobatory of this system. If I am to judge of the feelings & disposition of the people of the U.S. from what I beleive to be the temper of Virginia on this question, I can not doubt that nine tenths of America applaud the policy...
The very defenceless Situation of the town of Norfolk and its proximity to the Sea invites the insult and injury of any adventuring pirate who may find it convenient to make the attempt. I cannot therefore forbear Suggesting the propriety of placing that town and post in a state of defence fitted to protect it from those injuries to which alone it can be exposed So long as the wise policy...
As soon after my hearing of your return to Mt Vernon as I could, I sat out for a visit to you, but unfortunately your stay at home was so short that I could not see you. I had reached Stafford court house when I accidentally learned that you had departed on the previous sunday, and on knowing this I instantly turned back from whence I came. This disappointment would have always been mortifying...
I return my dear General the papers you gave me having laid the foundation of a future sale if agreable then to you. The previous requisites are the possession of the other shares of the company and a law authorizing foreigners to hold real property in Virginia—Both these can be effected in the course of the year. I would have called & taken leave of you & Mrs Washington, but did not like to...
Permit me my dear president to offer my congratulations on the late unanimous renewal of affection & confidence on the part of your fellow-citizens, & to pray that the auspicious event may be attended with the happiest effects to you and to them. Col. Basset died on the fourth instant in consequence of a fall from his horse—Your amiable nephew at Eltham continues to linger without the smallest...
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 27 Oct. 1792. Henry Knox wrote Lee on 3 Nov. 1792 explaining that GW “has directed me to acknowledge the receipt of your Excellency’s Letter to him of the 27th ultimo.” For Knox’s letter to Lee, see Knox to GW, 3 Nov. 1792, n.1 .