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You will no doubt have understood that the Antifederal party has prevailed in this State by a large majority. It is therefore of the utmost importance that all external circumstances should be made use of to influence their conduct. This will suggest to you the great advantage of a speedy decision in your State, if you can be sure of the question, and a prompt communication of the event to us....
In the letter which I had the honour of writing to your Excellency on the 5th. of October, I inclosed one from Vautelet by which you would see he did not intend to pay his son’s bill. I now inclose you the bill regularly protested. A pacification between France and England has taken place, by which the affairs of Holland are to remain as they are, the Stadtholder being restored. This country...
I have now before me your several favors of Apr. 16. 26. and 30. and of May 9. and 29. and received also a few days ago the box containing the skin, bones and horns of the Moose and other animals which your Excellency has been so kind as to take so much trouble to obtain and forward. They were all in good enough condition except that a good deal of the hair of the Moose had fallen off. However...
I have duly received your favor of April 27. wherein you advise me of having drawn on me for £46–17–10 sterl. and refer me to an explanation sent by Capt. Samuel Pierce , which explanation and the captain also have probably miscarried, as I have as yet heard nothing of them. Supposing that this must be for the bones and skin of the Moose which your Excellency had been so kind as to undertake...
The readiness with which you undertook to endeavour to get for me the skin, the skeleton, and the horns of the Moose, the Caribou, and the Orignal or Elk, emboldens me to renew my application to you for those objects, which would be an acquisition here, more precious than you can imagine. Could I chuse the manner of preparing them, it should be to leave the hoof on, to leave the bones of the...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr. Ducher a French Gentleman who is appointed to reside as Vice Consul at Portsmouth in the State of New Hampshire. You will find him an intelligent speculative man. He came to this Country attracted by an affinity of principles and with a view to a philosophical retirement; but having been shipwrecked with a loss of part of himself and a much larger part of his...
I was some time since honored with your favor of the 27th of April and postponed my answer in order to obtain Mr. Dores answer to your Queries respecting the Moose. I now inclose you Mr. Hasseys answer to my Letter with answers to your Queries taken by him from Mr. Dore and the other Hunters in that Quarter. I also send you answers from Gilbert Warren a famous hunter in the province of Main....
[ Annapolis, 27 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “Genl. Sullivan. Acknol. receipt his letters—glad of further information on Moose-correspondence—Western territory—adjournment Congr.” Not found. The letters of Sullivan acknowledged by this were those of 12 Mch. (received 13 Apr.) and 3 Apr. (received 23 Apr.).]
I have now the honor to inclose answers to your Queries respecting the Moose , and beg you will excuse the long delay. It was late in February when I arrived at Durham and being deeply impressed with the necessity of having your Queries answered with the greatest exactness I wrote to persons in various parts of the Country but have as yet received no answers but the inclosed. My principal...
By the Last eastern Mail I received your favor of the 30th Ulto accompanied by a Letter to Colo. Holland; I made no delay in giving directions to have that Letter forwarded immediately by flagg to New York—I am Dear Sir with great regard & esteem Your Most Obdt Servt I have received no answer to either of the other Letters. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I am to acknowledge the recet of your favor of the 16 November with its inclosures which were forwarded agreably to your Desire to New York. I am much obliged to you for your wishes for my Welfare and beg you to believe that I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been honord with your Favor of the 2d instant—& have to give you my sincere Thanks for your kind wishes & offers to do all in your Power to forward our intended Operations. I could wish your Stay in Congress might be continued longer than you intimate—as your Efforts there, from your Knowlege of Military Matters, might be of essential Service to our Designs—The Army is now drawn near to...
I have been favoured with your two letters of the 2d & 17th of May; the former reached me at Weathersfield after I had met the Count de Rochambeau at that place—from which time to the present moment, my whole attention has been so occupied by a variety of concerns, that I have been hitherto involuntarily prevented from doing myself the pleasure of writing to you. No arguments were necessary to...
Not Having seen, or heard, of any resolve of Congress for establishing the principles of promotion in the army, I am apprehensive that the Report of the Committee who had this matter under consideration is now sleeping in Congress. this, & a recent instance in the Pensylvania Regiment of Artillery, in proof of the absolute necessity of adopting some mode by which the whole Army may be b oun d...
Inclosed are my remarks on the report you were pleased to transmit me—They are made pursuant to the request contained in your letter of the 9th Ulto—Where I have been unfortunate enough to differ in sentiment from the Committee I have, in as concise a manner as I was able, assigned my reasons for it; if there is weight in them, I have no doubt of their being attended to—if there is not, it...
Colo. Armand deliver’d me your favor of the 29th Ulto last Evening & I thank you for the sevl communications contained in it—The measure adopted by Congress of appointing a Minister of War—Finance—& for Foreign Affairs I think a very wise one. To give efficacy to it, proper characters will, no doubt, be chosen to conduct the business of these departments. How far Colo. Hamilton—of whom you ask...
New Windsor [ New York ] January 21, 1781 . Has sent troops to quell the mutiny in New Jersey. Urges that no terms may be made with the mutineers. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I am honored with your letter of the 15th—I have just received the disagreeable intelligence of the Jersey line having followed the example of the Pensylvanian—This spirit will spread itself through the remainder of the army, if not extinguished by some decisive measure. I shall as quick as possible, at all events, march a detachment to compel the mutineers to submission and I beg leave...
I was honored last Evening with your favor of the 10 with a Postscript of the 11th Instant. Major Gen. St Clair will inform you of the reasons why I thought it imprudent to address my dispatches in answer to your Letters of the 7th & 9 immediately to you, he will also advise you of the Measures I had taken. It gives me great satisfaction to learn a final & cordial accommodation was like to...
Your letter of the 9th is safe at hand, & propounds a question respecting promotion which I candidly acknowledge I am puzzled to answer—with satisfaction to myself. If in all cases—ours was one Army—or thirteen Armies allied for the common defence, there would be no difficulty in solving your question—but we are occasionally both—and I should not be much out if I was to say that we are...
Passaic Falls [ New Jersey ] November 25, 1780 . Introduces the Chevalier de Chastellux. Asks Sullivan to support the promotion of Brigadier General Henry Knox and Washington’s ideas on the “Inspectorate department.” Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Sullivan was at this time a member of Congress from New Hampshire. François Jean,...
This Letter will be presented to you by the Chevr De Chattelleaux, a Majr Genl in the French Service—a Gentn of polite and easy manners, and of literary as well as military abilities. I intended in my last (but having Spun my letter to an enormous length, deferred it) to have observed that as Congress had made one or two late promotions from Brigadiers to Major Generals, apparently on the...
You have obliged me very much by your friendly letter of the 12th and I can assure you that I shall be very happy in a continuation of them—You are too well acquainted with my course of business to expect frequent, or long letters from me, but I can truely say that I shall write to none with more pleasure, when it is in my power to write at all, than I shall do to you. The determination of...
I write to you under a persuasion that the present moment in our affairs calls upon the virtue of every individual as well as every state: and that there has been no period of the War more important, or where men of influence could do more substantial good to their country. Either the evils that must follow, should we not be able to co-operate to effect with the French assistance, which is...
[ Morristown, New Jersey, December 15, 1779. ] Assures Sullivan of friendship and esteem. Thanks Sullivan for news concerning an intrigue against Washington. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Sullivan had resigned his commission on November 30, 1779.
I had the pleasure of receiving a few days since by Capt. Bruin your letter of the 1st instant. I assure you, my Dear Sir, I am sensibly touched by so striking an instance of your friendship, at a time and in a manner, that demonstrates its sincerity and confirms the opinion I have always entertained of your sentiments towards me. I wish you to believe, that your uneasiness on the score you...
As soon as possible after receipt of this letter, you will put the Troops under your command in motion for their Winter cantonments, agreeably to the routes (which I presume has been) given to you by the Qr Mr Genl —In case these should not have reached you—Clintons and Hands Brigades will compose part of the main Army, & must march by Rockaway Bridge and Morris Town (unless by application to...
If you yet have nothing more than conjecture for the enemy’s descent in Jersey, I beg you will order the 7th Massachusetts Regiment (late Alden’s) immediately to join Pattersons Brigade at this place —And Major Parr to comply strictly with the inclosed order (which issued the 7th instant). They may as the nearest and best way, take the route by Kings-ferry. The baggage of the Regiment may from...
I have received your favor of the 4th with its inclosure from Governor Livingston dated the 2d, relative to the enemy’s preparations on Staten Island. Should your subsequent information look like a serious intention of invading the State, it may be proper to move to Pompton, and hold yourself in readiness to act agreeable to circumstances. The large collections of forage have no doubt...
I have your favr of the 28th: You will, previous to the receipt of this, have received intelligence that the enemy have returned to Staten Island—We have a very large and valuable collection of Forage under Newark Mountain, which is much exposed, and which, from the late specimen, may be easily destroyed by a light party —To cover this, you will be pleased to detach General Maxwell with his...
Since my letter of yesterday, I have received an account (tho it does not come well authenticated) that the enemy had destroyed the forage at Middlebrook and were still in that quarter. I wish you to move towards them as light, and with as much expedition as possible. The Virginia division under Lord Stirling, and the Light Infantry under Genl Wayne with your own troops and the militia will...
I have this moment received advice that the enemy (said to be 5000) landed yesterday at Amboy and were advancing towards Brunswick. Their intent yet unknown but I think a forage or the interruption of our stores from the Southward is most probable. The Virginia division and the light infantry who were near Kakeyate marched this morning at Sun rise to Paramus, from whence they will proceed as...
I have been duly favored with your letter of the 22d. The enemy having evacuated both their posts at Kings ferry you will on receipt of this proced with your troops to Sufferans at the entrance of the Clove. Should you not have advanced far on your march to Warwick, Hacketstown—Mount-pleasant—Mount-Hope and Pompton would appear the most eligible route to this place. But that I may know this...
The crowded situation of the Troops in this quarter & the difficulty in procuring forage & other matters induces me to desire you will halt those under your command, in the neighbourhood of Chester where they will be best accommodated. Any distance from 4 to 12 miles above that place towards Sussex Court House will be a convenient position, & answer every purpose in case a co-operation with...
I received your favor of the 11th instant yesterday evening. We have not yet been able to ascertain how far the Count means to extend his co-operations; nor have we learned the event of his visit to the Southward. We expect however very interesting news every day, from this quarter—Till we can know something more definitive respecting his designs, it will be unnecessary to harrass your troops...
Since mine of the 5th (of which I inclose a duplicate) I have had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 28th ulto from Chemung and 30th from Tioga. I congratulate you upon your return in safety to that place, and upon the success which has attended the Expedition intrusted to your care. I am transmitting the particulars to Congress. I have yet heard nothing further of the French fleet, but...
The 3d Instt I wrote to you, & for fear of accidents inclose a copy of the letter as your forming a junction with this Army as speedily as possible may be of the utmost importance. I have not received a line from you since the 30th of Augt which I can no otherwise acct for than by a miscarriage of letters—I am altogether unacquainted with your movements since the battle at Newtown & have only...
[ West Point ] October 3, 1779 . Instructs Sullivan to join the main Army for possible “cooperation” with D’Estaing. Sends news of arrival of D’Estaing off coast of Georgia. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
From an account I have just received I hope this will meet you on your route from Tioga. It is intended to quicken your march that you may with all possible dispatch form a junction with this army. You will feel the importance of this when I tell you that it is probable we shall shortly have a cooperation with his Excellency Count D’Estaing, which from the enemy’s numbers in New York will...
I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 30th of August, and congratulate you sincerely on the success of the engagement at Newtown. I immediately transmitted your account to Congress. The advantages we have already gained over the Indians in the destruction of so many of their settlements is very flattering to the expedition. But to make it as conclusive as the state of your...
I was made very happy to find, by yours of the 20th ulto that your junction with General Clinton would take place on the next day, and that no opposition had been given to him on the passage down the River. Colonel Pawling, not having been able to reach Anaquaga at the appointed time, and upon his arrival there, finding that General Clinton had passed by, has returned to the Settlements with...
I was yesterday favd with yours of the 15th instant from Tioga, and congratulate you upon your success against Chemung and Scheshequenung. This stroke, I hope, will put your junction with General Clinton out of all hazard, after which, I think you have little to fear. I have the pleasure to inform you, that in the night of the 18th instant, Major Lee of the Dragoons, with a detachment from the...
I have recd your favors of the 6th and 7th instants. I hope your next will inform me of your arrival at Tioga without interruption, and of your having formed a junction with General Clinton, of which event I am exceedingly anxious to hear. I have furnished the Commissary General of Purchases with such parts of your letters as respect your Magazine of provision, and have directed him to ord⟨er⟩...
West Point, August 4, 1779. Congratulates Sullivan on overcoming difficulties and wishes him success on expedition against Indians. Df , in writing of H, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord.
I send you a duplicate of my last letter of the 1st instant to guard against miscarriage; since which I am favoured with your’s of the 29th inclosing the copy of one to General Clinton. I immediately forwarded a triplicate to the Governor requesting him to dispatch it to his brother, which will serve to render the receipt of your letter still more certain. I at the same time requested the...
West Point, August 1, 1779. Describes raid by Joseph Brant and a party of Indians. Informs Sullivan of American attack on Stony Point. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Brandt at the head of a party of Whites & Indians said to have amounted to eighty or ninety men has lately made an incursion into the Minisinks and cut off a party of fifty or sixty of our militia. It is reported that Brandt himself was either killed or wounded in the action —By a fellow belonging to this party, who has fallen into our hands, as he pretends voluntarily (but is suspected to...
West Point, July 29, 1779. Has referred Sullivan’s complaints against the commissary and quartermaster departments to Major General Nathanael Greene and Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have been duly favored with your letter of the 10th, the contents of which are of so serious a nature, with respect to the Quarter Masters and Commissary’s departments, that I thought it my duty to communicate them to General Greene and Col. Wadsworth —If there has been neglect in either department, the delinquents must be reponsible to the public and these Gentlemen ought to be acquainted...
New Windsor [ New York ] July 5, 1779 . Suggests that Sullivan instruct Brigadier General James Clinton to send all but subsistence supplies back to Canajoharie. Discusses advance of Sullivan’s troops and meeting with Clinton. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.