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Washington used to say Sometimes “They work me hard” Sam. Allen Otis said a day or two before his Death “They work me two hard” And I who have not the Honor to be “ Father of my Country” nor Secretary of the Senate, might now say in my Octoginary year, that John Taylor and a dozen others, some of them greater and some of them less Men, now work me confoundedly hard: but I will not say it. I...
Cobbets Letter to Niles, inclosed in yours of the 17th, with some of his usual fooleries, contains many important facts and ingenious reflections, Sometimes lear I love Clergimen because they are often Sociable and Sensible Men, and sometimes learned: but the Priesthood Seems to have Something militant and belligerent in its nature. The high ones are always gladiators. Their Controversies are...
I thank you for your for two Letters from the Valley; one dated October 4th. the other November the first, 1815. The Documents to which you refer are of so much Importance to your Reputation and to mine, that I wish you would depose it, the Sketch you have made of them, somewhere in print. It is at my Age impossible for me to look up the Scattered Volumes in which they are to be found and my...
[ Totowa, New Jersey ] November 4, 1780 . Approves Smith’s decision to take the place of a retiring lieutenant colonel. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Smith was a lieutenant colonel in Spencer’s Regiment. In January, 1781, he became adjutant and inspector on the Marquis de Lafayette’s staff.
New York, March 15, 1799. “I have received your letter of the 13th instant and thank you for the suggestions contained therein.…” Df , in the handwriting of Philip Church, Library of Congress.
It is proper for you to be informed officially that I have appointed Capt. Church of your Regiment my Aid de Camp. I am sensible that in strict propriety, this ought to have been done previous to his appointment—in order that you might have had an opportunity to state to me if any particular reasons, in respect to the interests of the Regiment stood in the way of the appointment. The Omission...
[ New York, June 5, 1799. On June 12, 1799, Smith wrote to Hamilton and acknowledged “the receipt of your Letter of the 5th. inst.” Letter not found. ]
New York, November 13, 1799. In reply to Smith’s letter of November 11, 1799, states: “There is no provision in the law for Chaplains , and I can not therefore comply with your wishes. I am nevertheless deeply impressed with the importance of divine service among the troops, and have heretofore made it a subject of communication with the S of War.…” Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How,...
New York, November 18, 1799. “… I have not the smallest objection to the Officers being taught the use of the sword by the French gentlemen of whom you speak, nor to any measures of the kind which you may think proper to adopt that will not involve an actual expence to the public.” Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Smith to H, November 15, 1799 .
[ Philadelphia, December 17, 1799. On December 23, 1799, Smith wrote to Hamilton and referred to “your Letter of the 17th.” Letter not found. ]
Your different letters of the 23rd 24th and 28th. of December have been delivered to me. It is always difficult in contracts to define the quality of the articles which are to be furnished, and hence has arisen the silence of which you complain in the contract with the Agent for New Jersey. It is however implied in the nature of the transaction that the articles be good according to the common...
[ New York, February 21, 1800. On March 5, 1800, Smith wrote to Hamilton : “I have the Honor to acknowledge the receipt of two letters of the 21st.… ulto.” One letter not found. ] The second letter of this date is listed in the appendix to this volume.
[ New York, February 25, 1800. On March 5, 1800, Smith wrote to Hamilton acknowledging “the receipt of two letters of the … 25th. ulto.” One letter not found. ] The second letter of this date is listed in the appendix to this volume.
I have received your letters of the 5th and 7th instants. As some of the subjects were discussed in conversation with you the other day it will not be necessary to repeat the remarks that were then made. On the subject of wood I have written to Col. Ogden. I can not say any thing relative to the claim of Captain White, having never been able to obtain from the S of War a definitive rule on the...
The proper measure of the pace is a matter of primary importance in the Tactics of the Infantry. The establishments of different Nations differ in this particular. For example—Our pace is two feet English measure. That of the French is two feet French or about 26 Inches English. That of the English is 30 of their Inches, measuring in each case from heel to heel. This is rather capricious. The...
Inclosed is a plan of the Formation of a Regiment for Exercise or Battle, of which I request your mature consideration, and that you will favour me as early as may be with the result of your reflections. The more careful and particular your criticism, the more will it oblige me. ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. In the margin of this letter H wrote: “Two copies as in the original...
Your letter of the 17th. instant, with its enclosures has been received. I am, for my own part prefectly satisfied with the representation given by the Major, of the conduct of your officers in the affair at Elisabeth town—but as an account of it has made its appearance in the public papers, which has represented the matter to their disadvantage, I think you are interested for the honor of...
Some publications having appeared in the news papers in respect to a disturbance at Elizabeth Town implicating Capt Courtlandt & Lt. Livingston of the twelveth Regiment—it is proper that the public should know that early and particular inquiry was made into the affair by order of Major General Hamilton, & that, according to information received from very respectable authority in the Civil...
It appears by a Report of the Dy P M G that no return has come from the 12 Regiment of the Cloathing on hand as required by the general order of the 11th of March. Considering the time which has elapsed since the issuing of that order if there are any articles of Cloathing in the possession of the Pay Master of that Regiment he has been guilty of very great neglect for which he ought to be...
Altho’ I have not been officially advised of it, yet I have received information sufficient to satisfy me that an act of Congress has passed for disbanding the twelve additional regiments on or before the fifteenth of June next, granting an allowance to the officers and soldiers of three months pay from the time of their discharge. I mention this to you that it may be understood unofficially...
Mr. Brown, one of my Secretaries is the bearer of this letter—he goes before me to take possession of my quarters. You will have a Subaltern’s guard at those quarters on Wednesday next. With great consideration Df , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For H’s visit to the troops at Scotch Plains, New Jersey, see H to Aaron Ogden, May 8, 1800, note 1 .
An order was issued, some time since, as you will recollect, directing enlistments to be “for and during the existing differences with France,” or for the term of five years at the pleasure of the government. It appearing probable that the number of men enlisted under these conditions is very inconsiderable, and an expectation having been entertained among them that they would not be separated...
Major Tousard has arrived here for the purpose of recruiting six companies of Artillerists. I request you to give facility to the accomplishment of the object. The men enlisted will not leave their corps untill the time of their disbandment. Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to James McHenry, first letter of May...
A General Court Marshall is to sit at Philadelphia on the thirteenth of next Month. It may happen that four Officers of your Regiment may be wanted to complete the Court. You will please to notify this number to hold themselves in readiness for a further order. As a Captain is among the persons to be tried it is proper that as many Captains as may can be conveniently had, may compose the...
The enclosed copy of a General Order will apprise you of the appointment of a Court Martial to convene at this City on Wednesday next. It is intended that it shall be composed of officers of your Regiment and of that of Coll. Ogden. The number from each cannot now be fixed. But you will provisionally cause to be notified all your officers in or near this City that they are to hold themselves...
You will please to cause to be detailed for members of the Court Martial of which Major Wilcocks is appointed President, seven Officers of your Regiment of whom as many as practicable to be Captains You are apprised that the Court is to convene on Wednesday. With great consideration & esteem I am Sir Yr Obed St. ( Df , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Your favor of the 20 instant just reached me at this place. The information given you by Major Wilcocks is correct—To obviate possible difficulty on the part of Col Fish, I write to him by the post which carries this letter—to deliver over the money to your Regimental Paymaster The letter herewith answers your concluding enquiry with great consideration I am Sir Yr. obed servt. (Copy, in the...
The Secretary of War has directed me to inquire whether Capt. Justus B Smith Lts. Thomas Thompson & Jacob C Ten Eyck have mean to accept or decline their appointments. If known to you, you will please to inform me, if not known, you will then ascertain & communicate to me what may be the fact With great consideration I am Sir Yr. Obed St ( ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Your letter of yesterday is received. I am glad to find that matters are in so good a train; and take particular interest in the favorable appearances respecting Lt. Cocks With great consideration & (Copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
If — I am not mistaken, you have already received an additional supply of money so as to obviate the embarrassments stated in your letter of the 21 of June. I approve the idea of permitting the recruiting Officers, who are successful, to go as far as they can; not confining themselves to the complement of their own companies— I agree with you then there is a prospect The motives which led you...