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Your letter from Harwich, dated August 10, reached us upon the 11th. We were very glad to hear of your arrival there, and continue to follow you with our good wishes. When you tendered me your services, and asked my commands, I did not know you had any thoughts of returning by the way of Paris; otherwise I should have charged you with a few. I now write by Mr. Short, requesting your care of an...
Col. Franks being detained to day by an accident gives me the opportunity of replieing to your kind Letter last evening received; Col. Forrest had inclosed them to Mr. Adams and we were not a little rejoiced to hear from you after an interval of 4 weeks in which we had spent many conjectures where you was at one time, and where you was were at an other. Mr. Adams received your Letter from...
Last evening col Forrest sent a servant with a Letter addrest to me, but upon opening it, I found I was honourd only with the cover. The inclosed I deliverd the Lady who sat next me but as I could not prevail with her to communicate a word more than “that the cake was good” I threatned her with opening the next unless I should find something in the cover to appease me. But I did not keep my...
After a very pleasant Journey, here We are. We came very leisurely, dined the first day at Ingatestone and Slept at Witham, dined Yesterday at Mistley (Mr Rigbys Seat very near) and Slept where We now are, in full View of the Land Guard Fortification, with a fair Sun and fine Breeze. Our Carriage is on Board. As Fortune will have it, Hearn is the Captain. It is my third Passage with him. The...
I have written you only a few lines since your absence; and those conveyed to you rather an unpleasing account, but you will find my letter attended with so many others of a different complexion, that I hope it will not give you a moment’s uneasiness. Mrs. Smith is now very well, and sitting here at the table, making herself a mourning bonnet, for the Princess Carolina Wilhelmina, whom neither...
I was much obliged to you for a letter by Mr. Nesbit of Philadelphia, and am very sorry I could not have more of his company. He was much esteemed, I find, in Boston. I wished for you, when he was here, because you could never have a better opportunity of seeing your old military friends. We had a review of the militia, upon my farm; and a battle that threw down all my fences. I wish, however,...
I shall not entertain you with public affairs, because you will learn the state of them from the public papers more in detail. I shall only say, that the National Government has succeeded beyond the expectations, even of the sanguine, and is more popular, and has given more general satisfaction than I expected ever to live to see. The addition of Vermont and Kentucky, the augmentation of our...
Although we have reason to expect, and hope for your speedy return, yet I would not let so good an opportunity as this, by the Portland packet, pass without writing you a few lines, partly to inform you, that your son is in perfect health, and has been so through the winter; that he is full of mirth and glee, and as fine a boy as you can wish him: and partly to congratulate you upon your...
Give me leave to congratulate you and my daughter, as well as your venerable Mother, and her and your amiable families on your arrival in America. The situation of that respectable office to which you have been promoted, and the unhappy sickness of the good Lady your Mother, made us all uncommonly anxious for your arrival, I hope you found your own family in health and your mother recovering....
I received yesterday your kind letter of the 9th of the month. The letters to Vergennes were sent to him, not presented. He acknowledged the receipt of them; and Congress acknowledged the receipt of the copies of them, and several others written before those two, upon the same subject, in a vote they passed about Sir John Temple. They say, that although Mr. Adams had thought fit to write a...
I Received yesterday your kind Letter of the 13 th and Return you and yours the Compliments of the Season and Thanks of your Congratulations on the Probability of a Cartain Election the felicities or infelicities of what Events however are Hidden from our Vew by that impenetrable Veil which Covers Futurity the Prospect at Present is not very bright a Country Impotent at Sea tho Powerful at...
I have received the Letter you wrote me on the 7th of this month, and I shall give all the attention to the Subject of it which may be necessary. It is not new to me— You are too precipitate in my opinion in pronouncing an opinion that the General has been guilty of high Crimes &C a: There have not been wanting Critics upon your conduct, as severe as you have been upon his It is reported not...
In answer to your Letter of yesterday, you will give me leave to say, that your assistance and advice, has been at all times so usefull and agreable to me, that I should loose the advantage of it with reluctance if it were only for a few Weeks, or even day’s— nevertheless the month of august is so dull and so disgusting & unwholesome in London the Place is so deserted by Men of Business as...
I have rec d your Favours from Harwich, Amsterdam and Berlin, and congratulate you on your Reception by the King of Prussia. I Shall have much Occasion for your Assistance but Still I would not advise you, to leave Paris without Spending a Week or Ten Days there and being presented by M r Jefferson to the King, provided there is a Court day at Versailles. I have been much pressed with Business...
According to Mr. Turgot’s idea of a perfect commonwealth, a single assembly is to be possessed of all authority, legislative, executive, and judicial. It will be a proper conclusion of all our speculations upon this, the most interesting subject which can employ the thoughts of men, to consider in what manner such an assembly will conduct its deliberations, and exert its power. The executive...
Congress by their resolutions of February the third 1787, determined that the letter to the Queen of Portugal herewith delivered you, should be transmitted to her Faithfull Majesty, by your Hands, you will therefore prepare yourself, as soon as conveniently may be, and proceed to Lisbon. In Your way, as you pass through france & Spain, you will of Course pay your respects to the Ministers of...
“The Secretary of the United States of America for the Department of foreign affaires, His Excellency John Jay to whom was referred a letter to him from the Honourable John Adams of the 27th. of June last, informing that the Queen of Portugal had ordered her squadron in the straits to protect the Vessels of the United States equally, with those of her own Subjects; on the 25th. day of January...
It should have been before observed, that the Western empire fell in the fifth century, and the Eastern in the fifteenth. Augustus was compelled by Odoacer, King of the Heruli. in 475, to abdicate the Western empire, and was the last Roman who possessed the Imperial dignity at Rome. The dominion of Italy fell, soon afterwards, into the hands of Theodoric the Goth. The Eastern empire lasted...
Before you receive this you will probably receive a letter from the Secy. at war informing you that the general officers have proposed either you or Mr. Hammond to be a Lt. Col. commandant. This event has embarassed me. I know not what to do. I know not whether the senate will not negative the nomination if I make it; nor whether you will accept the appointment if they should advise and...
I have received your letter of the 16th & the bundle of papers inclosed with a great deal of pain. The thing has not a good appearance. Mr. Shieflin had better have addressed his letter & papers to me than to you who are not the Secretary of War. You are suspected & have been accused of improper speculations in the neighborhood of Detroit & in connection with characters whose friendship does...
I have received your favor of the 23d of last month and read with pleasure, your account of the celebration of the 22d, according to my proclamation. A public prayer was very proper, but who was your chaplain? I have had some anxiety on that account. An unhappy, unfortunate gentleman may excite more levity, than reverence among the soldiery.— An emminent character and example of public virtue...
I have received your favor of the 2d & one or two letters before, recommending gentlemen to office. I am obliged by these communications & wish not to discourage you from continuing to give me information upon such subjects. If your recommendations should not be successfull, you will know the reason to be, that some other candidate presents with superior public claims. You mention not the...
Upon the receipt of your letter of the 21st, I sent a copy of it to General Hamilton, and the original to Mr. McHenry, and asked their candid opinion of it, without favor or affection. From General Hamilton I have as yet received no answer. From Mr. McHenry I have the inclosed, which is, I believe, a very honest answer; and, although I am not of his opinion in all points, I think there is...
I have appointed you Surveyor & Inspector, in the place of Mr. Lasher who has resigned. Your commission has been made out & delivered by the Secretary of State to the Secretary of the Treasury, who I presume has sent it to you, before now, but if by any accident, it has happened that you have not received it, you may enter immediately on the execution of the office & depend on receiving your...
I received last night your favor of the 18 & congratulate you on the receipt of your commission. You will do well to make a digest of the laws of the revenue, remembering Lord Cokes opinion, that abridgments are most useful to the makers of them. I have great relyance on your vigilance, activity & fidelity in the service. I know not whether your office corresponds with the Secretary of the...
Your Letter by Mr Rogers did not reach me untill the last week. The Crisis which I have long apprehended is arrived and brought with it the misiry I foresaw, but could not avert. All that intreaties, and pursuation could affect, I have attempted. I have conjured the unhappy Man by all that is dear; Honour, reputation, and Fame, his Family and Friends, to desist, and to strive to regain what he...
I have received your favor of the 12th. & your bill, in favor of Mr Nathan Prime for 300 dollars, shall be paid whenever it shall be presented.—We all arrived safe & are one more domesticated at Stony field. We hope you are all in good health. A very long storm has confined us at home. I have scarcely known such an equinoctial, since we returned from Europe. Nature I hope is returning to her...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of the raspberry bushes, and the pot of strawberry vines, for which accept my thanks. I have had them placed in a good part of the garden, and shall pay particular attention to them. I hope I shall be able to treat you with a plate of them, when I shall have the pleasure of seeing you at Quincy. Whatever strange events occur in the political world, I think...
As your brother has heretofore intimated to mine, that it would suit his convenience to discharge his note of hand to me, by a conveyance of lands belonging to him, and adjoining the settlement upon which he resides, I am disposed, as well from the desire to make such an arrangement as shall best accommodate him, as from the wish to settle this affair in a manner advantageous to myself, to...
Two months having elapsed since I made the proposal respecting the note of hand due from your brother Justus to me, and being still without an answer from him, I presume either that the proposal was not agreeable to him, or that some accident has delayed or misdirected his answer, and prevented its coming to hand. I have now settled once more in this town, and resumed the practice of the...