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I have this Moment received your Application to me requestg Liberty to join the combined Armies in the West Indies, for this Campaign. I applaud Gentlemen the noble & generous Ardor displayed on this Occasion—But having never taken upon me to grant Leave of Absence to Officers in the American Army, with out permission of Congress, your Application shall be conveyed to that Hono. Body—for their...
Inclosed is a plan of the Formation of a Regiment for Exercise or Battle, of which I request your mature consideration, and that you will favour me as early as may be with the result of your reflections. The more careful and particular your criticism, the more will it oblige me. ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. In the margin of this letter H wrote: “Two copies as in the original...
Altho’ I have not been officially advised of it, yet I have received information sufficient to satisfy me that an act of Congress has passed for disbanding the twelve additional regiments on or before the fifteenth of June next, granting an allowance to the officers and soldiers of three months pay from the time of their discharge. I mention this to you that it may be understood unofficially...
An order was issued, some time since, as you will recollect, directing enlistments to be “for and during the existing differences with France,” or for the term of five years at the pleasure of the government. It appearing probable that the number of men enlisted under these conditions is very inconsiderable, and an expectation having been entertained among them that they would not be separated...
The proper measure of the pace is a matter of primary importance in the Tactics of the Infantry. The establishments of different Nations differ in this particular. For example—Our pace is two feet English measure. That of the French is two feet French or about 26 Inches English. That of the English is 30 of their Inches, measuring in each case from heel to heel. This is rather capricious. The...
It appears by a Report of the Dy P M G that no return has come from the 12 Regiment of the Cloathing on hand as required by the general order of the 11th of March. Considering the time which has elapsed since the issuing of that order if there are any articles of Cloathing in the possession of the Pay Master of that Regiment he has been guilty of very great neglect for which he ought to be...
The Commander in Chief who has just gone to Poughkeepsie, has left it in charge with me to acknowledge the receipt of your Letter of the 25th and to inform you that he has no objections to your coming to the Army for the purposes you Mention; at which time your friends will be very happy to see you at Head Quarters—Mrs Washington (who desires me to present her Complts to you) has often...
I have just received your letter of yesterday, and have given orders to Capn. Read to furnish from the garrison the guard and the orderly sergeant which you request to attend the President of the Court Martial. I presume the different members of the Court have, before this time, arrived. With great consideration I am, Sir &c: &c: ( Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers,...
[ Totowa, New Jersey ] November 4, 1780 . Approves Smith’s decision to take the place of a retiring lieutenant colonel. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Smith was a lieutenant colonel in Spencer’s Regiment. In January, 1781, he became adjutant and inspector on the Marquis de Lafayette’s staff.
I have recieved, since my return to this place, the letter which you were so kind as to write on the 6th. of June, and am now to make you my acknowledgements for the information it contained. Very soon after I came to the government, I took measures for enquiring into the dispositions of the British cabinet on the matters in question between us: and what you now communicate corresponds very...
I am directed, in reply to your Letter of the 17 to inform you that Letters may in future be Sent direct from N. York to Elizabeth Town—I am Dr Sir Your very humble Ser. 20th Your Letter of the 18th just came to hand when the Commander in Chief Returns this Eveng. it Shall be answerd. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been sick a Month, and my eyes and hands incapable of writing otherise you would have heard more from me. Your favor of 18 Feby. arrived yesterday. Thanks for the Gazette. Well may you and I be perplexed in our calculations on post scenes and present unpleasant prospects, relative to the interior of the political state of Europe, and the interior & exterior aspect of our own national...
I have received your letter respecting Lt. Hoffman . The incident gives me great concern. It is a delicate affair and must be treated with very great circumspection. Inclosed is a letter which has been written to me by his accuser Lt. Livingston . Several respectable Characters (among these Doctor Charleton) have spoken to me of the Character of the accused in high terms—They represent him as...
I have received your letter of the fourteenth instant with it’s enclosure—It appears from the statement given that the application of Mr. Jones is a very improper one—Matters will therefore continue as they are. ( Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Your Letter of the 5th. contains Such an Abundance of Matter which appears to me as of so great importance, that I really was under a temptation to Commit a violation of private and family Confidence by inclosing the original directly to the President. But the Appointment of General Armstrong to the War Office, has rendered Such a desperate Step unnecessary. Whether the new Secretary is your...
I know not what to say to your Letter of 23rd. There are Men whom disaster haunts through life. Sinclair was one & Wilkinson is another. With apparent capacities and without any manifest guilt, nothing ever succeeds in their hands. To cover the blunders of the war, recourse must be had to the blunders and intrigues and corruptions in politics, from the commencement of the Revolution and long...
your Letter of August 12th I received in the absence of Mrs Smith, who was upon a visit to mrs Guild, and therefore I could not communicate it to her; she past Several days, in Boston at Dr welch’s, and as I had requested Dr warren was consulted in conjunction with Dr Welch upon her complaint, and their opinion was Similar to Dr Holbrook’s who is a Skilfull physician, and practises in our...
I have received, and read with—Sensations of grief and joy and Reflections of, (what shall I say approbation and disapprobation or of pride and humiliation? ) the Letter you wrote me on the 5th with all its enclosed papers. There seems to be, an irreversable decree against me, and every Being who has a drop of my blood in his or her Veins. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men Which taken at...
I have received Your two letters of the twentieth instant have been received. Neither remarks on the price of the wood contracted for I had not the smallest intention of finding fault with the part you had acted in the business—On the contrary I am well convinced that, as far as your agency was concerned that there was due care exercised—I am still however of opinion that the price is too high...
Mr Merrit who has permission to go into New York with a Massachusetts sum of Money for theNaval Prisoners, with upon you in his route for your advice & assistance. If it shall be thought as small effort is necessary for the protection of the money he is possessed of, The Commander in Chief wishes you would provide one to attend him to Dobbs Ferry.I am Dear Sir with perfect respect Your Most...
I have understood that the relative rank of the Officers of your regiment has not yet been communicated to them; as you may probably withold it from an idea of its not having yet received my final approbation, you will view the arrangement upon which we formerly agreed as decisive, with the single alteration, of Captain G. Kirkland’s being placed next in rank to Captain A. White with true...
In conducting the common business, at the Post of Dobbs’ Ferry (of which you have the superintendance), You will cause the Orders & Regulations contained in the several written Instructions which will be delivered to you by the present commanding Officer, to be duly attended to & observed—but I have thought it necessary to give you this private Instruction, hereby authorizing you to take such...
I go farther than you in your Glooms I expect Detroit and Michigan will be again taken and all Perry fleet taken or burned How far you go in your hopes of Peace I know not. Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes. Romans would not treat in adversity neither Gauls nor Hannibal, could intimidate Rome, nor terrify any one to pronounce the word Peace. America asleep and Britain awake thro the winter may...
Col. Franks being detained to day by an accident gives me the opportunity of replieing to your kind Letter last evening received; Col. Forrest had inclosed them to Mr. Adams and we were not a little rejoiced to hear from you after an interval of 4 weeks in which we had spent many conjectures where you was at one time, and where you was were at an other. Mr. Adams received your Letter from...
You will discharge the soldier to Enclosed are some papers relative to the age of a soldier in the eleventh regiment—You will enquire into the case, and if the statement proves correct, discharge the person to whom they it relates. ( Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Your letter of the 17th. instant, with its enclosures has been received. I am, for my own part prefectly satisfied with the representation given by the Major, of the conduct of your officers in the affair at Elisabeth town—but as an account of it has made its appearance in the public papers, which has represented the matter to their disadvantage, I think you are interested for the honor of...
Monsieur de Tronchin, minister for the republic of Geneva at this court, having a son at this time in London, I take the liberty of introducing him to your acquaintance. A respect for the father induces me to this liberty, together with an assurance that the son merits it. He is young and may need a monitor, who, with the gay, may mix the serious, when it becomes necessary to keep him out of...
Major Tousard has arrived here for the purpose of recruiting six companies of Artillerists. I request you to give facility to the accomplishment of the object. The men enlisted will not leave their corps untill the time of their disbandment. Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to James McHenry, first letter of May...
I have received your favor of the 23d of last month and read with pleasure, your account of the celebration of the 22d, according to my proclamation. A public prayer was very proper, but who was your chaplain? I have had some anxiety on that account. An unhappy, unfortunate gentleman may excite more levity, than reverence among the soldiery.— An emminent character and example of public virtue...
I expected you would have been at Camp with the detatchment under your command before this time but I imagine the Weather and Roads have hindered you. I desire you will lose no time in marching after you receive this; and that you will bring with you all the Men of other Corps that are sufficiently recovered from the Hospitals and properly clad to do duty. I am &c. Df , in Tench Tilghman’s...