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I thank you for your for two Letters from the Valley; one dated October 4th. the other November the first, 1815. The Documents to which you refer are of so much Importance to your Reputation and to mine, that I wish you would depose it, the Sketch you have made of them, somewhere in print. It is at my Age impossible for me to look up the Scattered Volumes in which they are to be found and my...
Cobbets Letter to Niles, inclosed in yours of the 17th, with some of his usual fooleries, contains many important facts and ingenious reflections, Sometimes lear I love Clergimen because they are often Sociable and Sensible Men, and sometimes learned: but the Priesthood Seems to have Something militant and belligerent in its nature. The high ones are always gladiators. Their Controversies are...
Washington used to say Sometimes “They work me hard” Sam. Allen Otis said a day or two before his Death “They work me two hard” And I who have not the Honor to be “ Father of my Country” nor Secretary of the Senate, might now say in my Octoginary year, that John Taylor and a dozen others, some of them greater and some of them less Men, now work me confoundedly hard: but I will not say it. I...
I rejoice in your Recovery from Sickness and wish a perfect restoration of your health—I think I may Congratulate you on the Glorious termination of the War. The Rejoicings here are enthusiastic, If Such Rejoicings here are at my Peace with France in 1800, had been Exhibited, would the Condition of our Country at this hour however have been better? Tallard when he had been beaten and taken...
It is sometime since I have written to you and I feel that I owe you a Letter; you do not like our state movement any better than I do the long and and numerous Speeches of your wordy Fraternity. yet I like to read them, and when the character of the Gentleman is preserved, and due respect paid to constituted Authorities, I listen to the opposite Parties with pleasure, but I must say too many...
I thank you for your favour of the 23d.— Gerry is gone to joine his Copatriots in lamentations over the degeneracy of his Country; at least in Sagadahock, Nantucket and Alexandria. I am, left alone, to carry the last and worst tidings to the Skies. What Shall I? What can I say of Mr Gerry’s Family? An amiable Wisdom and nine amiable Children. I can say no more— MHi : Adams Family Papers,...
Yesterday I received your packet of the 7th. you ask “What is to be the result of the Convention at Hartford?” What a question! Had you asked my opinion of the measure I would have said, it is neither wise, honorable, or virtuous; and I would have requested you to give my compliments to every Virginian you meet, high or low, and tell him, that Massachusetts deserves to be made to repent of it...
It is already three weeks since you left us; I have not any knowledge of your progress farther than New-Haven, where General Humphreys informed me that he had the pleasure of meeting you. I wish to hear form you, although I cannot expect that you have anything agreeable of a public nature to communicate, from the desolate walls of Washington. I will, however, turn my face from that forlorn...
Your letter of 2 April I duly received I Should have replied to it by the last mail, but I was not in a humour at that time. I therefore d eclined it, hoping that the next post would be more Satisfactory to me, and account for a delay which did not correspond with former professions. it has accordingly brought Such explanations as an fully Satisfactory to all concernd —oweing to the delay of...
I received your Letter of March the 12th in replie to mine, of the 2d ult. the method you took to inform yourself respecting the Character and circumstances of the person in Question was highly judicious and the return you received, very Satisfactory and pleasing. the terms you have exa c ted met my cordial approbation. I should perhaps, had it been left to me have prolonged the time of...
I know not what to say to your Letter of 23rd. There are Men whom disaster haunts through life. Sinclair was one & Wilkinson is another. With apparent capacities and without any manifest guilt, nothing ever succeeds in their hands. To cover the blunders of the war, recourse must be had to the blunders and intrigues and corruptions in politics, from the commencement of the Revolution and long...
I have been sick a Month, and my eyes and hands incapable of writing otherise you would have heard more from me. Your favor of 18 Feby. arrived yesterday. Thanks for the Gazette. Well may you and I be perplexed in our calculations on post scenes and present unpleasant prospects, relative to the interior of the political state of Europe, and the interior & exterior aspect of our own national...
I go farther than you in your Glooms I expect Detroit and Michigan will be again taken and all Perry fleet taken or burned How far you go in your hopes of Peace I know not. Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes. Romans would not treat in adversity neither Gauls nor Hannibal, could intimidate Rome, nor terrify any one to pronounce the word Peace. America asleep and Britain awake thro the winter may...
It gave me great pleasure to be informed of your punctual arrival at the head quarters of good Principles and of good dispositions as I hope; of too little experience as I fear; and of too much eloquence as I certainly know. I need not quote to you “Dum Roma deliberat periat Seguntum.” My memory furnishes enough of examples of more modern date and nearer home. Canada was lost 35 or 36 years...
Your favour of 15th is alarming. Remember the fate of Cassandra. The prophet of ill ’tho’ as true as a goose’s bow is always detested. I also have been now and then reckoned among the minor prophets. Not a bone of any Goose ever picked by Jo Green, Nick Boylston, & Master Lovel on a Christmas eve, tho’ they had Nat Gardner for a guest, and exhausted all their wit, Gibes, & Jokes upon it, ever...
Your letters give us information as well as entertainment. Your reception at head Quarters & at the war office, augur well for the public. It is impossible that your ideas, your conversation, can be wholly lost to either Dearborne is really to be pitied. He is worn down and tormented by the disease that humbled the great spirit of Louis 14th; not to mention the misfortunes of the first year of...
We were happy to find by your Letter 22d of May that you had arrived safe at Baltimore on your way to the great city of Washington—We have not pursued the jocular hints or menaces on promisses of advice to you in your legislative Capacity as yet—for reasons too many to enumerate. We do not however give up the right of Instructing you—when we please—We claim this priviledge—not as Friends—Not...
While I am writing the loud Roar of the cannon announce the landing of comodore Bainbriddge from the fortunate frigate constitution. the account of the Capture of the Frigate Java I presume you will get, sooner than this Letter will reach you. She contended bravely an hour and 50 minuts untill masts spars and rigging were all gone and the ship a wreck. accordingly she was blown up by Commodore...
Your Letter of the 5th. contains Such an Abundance of Matter which appears to me as of so great importance, that I really was under a temptation to Commit a violation of private and family Confidence by inclosing the original directly to the President. But the Appointment of General Armstrong to the War Office, has rendered Such a desperate Step unnecessary. Whether the new Secretary is your...
I received yesterday your favour of the 16th of last month. It is of no other use to ruminate upon the faults, Errors, and blunders of Congress and Washington in the revolutionary War, or upon those of Congress and Jefferson or Congress and Madison during the last twelve years; than to derive wisdom from their costly experience, and rectify our counsels and correct the conduct of our arms for...
I have received, and read with—Sensations of grief and joy and Reflections of, (what shall I say approbation and disapprobation or of pride and humiliation? ) the Letter you wrote me on the 5th with all its enclosed papers. There seems to be, an irreversable decree against me, and every Being who has a drop of my blood in his or her Veins. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men Which taken at...
Your Letter of Decbr 30 1811 has Slept in my in my Beaurous untill your prophesys have become dreadfull realities—in which I rejoice that you have no lot or portion, if your experience and counsel had been held in requisition the fate of poor Hull might not have been a disgrace to the Nation—Gasconade ought always to be the exclusive Majesty of the Nation Said to be famous for it—just as I was...
My heart is one day as light as air and the next as heavy as lead. The Name of Hull, at one hour exalts my Imagination like a balloon to the Clouds: And a few Hours Afterwards the Same monosyllable depresses it to the Subterranean Caverns where Earthquakes are generated. How it has happened, that your Letter to your Mother of last December has never been acknowledged I know not. She read it to...
I yesterday received your Letter, and at the Same time, the President received the one inclosed from dr Rush which I think it my duty, altho a distressing and painfull one, to me, to communicate the contents to you by the earliest opportnty you will See by the Letter, that Mrs Smith wrote her case to dr Rush, which her Father inclosed with a request that he would give his candid opinion. Mrs...
your Letter of August 12th I received in the absence of Mrs Smith, who was upon a visit to mrs Guild, and therefore I could not communicate it to her; she past Several days, in Boston at Dr welch’s, and as I had requested Dr warren was consulted in conjunction with Dr Welch upon her complaint, and their opinion was Similar to Dr Holbrook’s who is a Skilfull physician, and practises in our...
I hope you will not impute my not writing to you by your son to want of attention to you, or a proper Sensibility to your request containd in your Letter to me. The extreem Heat of the weather, and my joy at the arrival of a dear and only Daughter after an absence of three years and a half, realley disqualified me for my pen, and Johns Stay was so limited that I could not Say by him What I...
I have within these few days successively received your two letters, one of them containing the relation of the circumstances respecting General Miranda’s projects, and your relations with him while he was in this Country; and the other containing the request that I would write an Oration for your Son John—On the first of these subjects, I trust that in the trial of the Cause, on the Bill...
I received last Evening your favour of the 23d:—The appointment of Mr. Schenck had been two or three days before confirmed by the Senate—I most sincerely lament your removal from the Office of Surveyor; but this act is exclusively within the power of the President, and the only notice he usually gives to the Senate of a removal is by a new Nomination to the Office—Such was the case in the...
I have to offer you my best acknowledgments for your obliging attention to my demands before the Commissioners of Bankruptcy, against Bird, Savage and Bird—If the demand of the United States has a preference to all others I am afraid the Government will not readily charge themselves with mine—I am however much obliged to you for the hint; of which I shall avail myself if it can be done with...
I find by the newspapers that a Commission of bankruptcy has issued against Robert Bird, and as it is impossible for me to attend personally before the Commissioners to make proof of my debt, and demand my claim, I take the liberty of inclosing them to you, with an earnest request that you would present them for me, at the next meeting of the Commissioners which I think is to be on the 10th:...
The above is a list of debts, stated by the House of Bird, Savage and Bird, as due to them in New-York—If you can find among them enough to attach on a demand of mine for fifteen sixteen thousand dollars, I will thank you to have it done—If you can from your knowledge of the persons, let me know, what proportion of them promises to be good for any thing, I shall be grateful for the favour....
The House of Bird, Savage and Bird, in London, had, when they failed, property, to the amount of nearly £4000 Sterling, belonging to my father in their hands; for which I had drawn bills in October and November last—These bills are now returning protested for me to take up, with all the costs and charges upon them—I now write you, not with an expectation that you will find any property of...
I duely recd yours of the 16th with the Paper enclosed. I had given no Attention to the Attack upon you in Cheethams Paper, because I know that no Integrity of heart, no Purity of Conduct, or Innocence of Life can protect any Man from the Shafts of Calumny, in these times of party rage and under an elective Government, which breeds Passions and prejudices as fast as ever the Sun upon the Slime...
Two months having elapsed since I made the proposal respecting the note of hand due from your brother Justus to me, and being still without an answer from him, I presume either that the proposal was not agreeable to him, or that some accident has delayed or misdirected his answer, and prevented its coming to hand. I have now settled once more in this town, and resumed the practice of the...
As your brother has heretofore intimated to mine, that it would suit his convenience to discharge his note of hand to me, by a conveyance of lands belonging to him, and adjoining the settlement upon which he resides, I am disposed, as well from the desire to make such an arrangement as shall best accommodate him, as from the wish to settle this affair in a manner advantageous to myself, to...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of the raspberry bushes, and the pot of strawberry vines, for which accept my thanks. I have had them placed in a good part of the garden, and shall pay particular attention to them. I hope I shall be able to treat you with a plate of them, when I shall have the pleasure of seeing you at Quincy. Whatever strange events occur in the political world, I think...
I have received your favor of the 12th. & your bill, in favor of Mr Nathan Prime for 300 dollars, shall be paid whenever it shall be presented.—We all arrived safe & are one more domesticated at Stony field. We hope you are all in good health. A very long storm has confined us at home. I have scarcely known such an equinoctial, since we returned from Europe. Nature I hope is returning to her...
Your Letter by Mr Rogers did not reach me untill the last week. The Crisis which I have long apprehended is arrived and brought with it the misiry I foresaw, but could not avert. All that intreaties, and pursuation could affect, I have attempted. I have conjured the unhappy Man by all that is dear; Honour, reputation, and Fame, his Family and Friends, to desist, and to strive to regain what he...
I received last night your favor of the 18 & congratulate you on the receipt of your commission. You will do well to make a digest of the laws of the revenue, remembering Lord Cokes opinion, that abridgments are most useful to the makers of them. I have great relyance on your vigilance, activity & fidelity in the service. I know not whether your office corresponds with the Secretary of the...
I have appointed you Surveyor & Inspector, in the place of Mr. Lasher who has resigned. Your commission has been made out & delivered by the Secretary of State to the Secretary of the Treasury, who I presume has sent it to you, before now, but if by any accident, it has happened that you have not received it, you may enter immediately on the execution of the office & depend on receiving your...
I request that you will call the attention of the different Paymasters to those men who may have been confined by the Sentences of Courts martial to hard labor, they being entitled to their pay— With &c. ( Df , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
I have directed the DQM General to furnish the troops with transportation to places from which they can conveniently procure conveyance to their respective homes— The sick will remain here under the care of Dr. Chetwood, or of some surgeon whom I shall send from N York—The Contractor has been directed to supply them with necessaries as heretofore. When I shall have left this place you will...
Major Tousard has arrived here for the purpose of recruiting six companies of Artillerists. I request you to give facility to the accomplishment of the object. The men enlisted will not leave their corps untill the time of their disbandment. Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to James McHenry, first letter of May...
Enclosed is a letter of appointment for Mr. James Rhea as second Lieutenant in the first Regiment of Infantry, which you will deliver send forward to him accordingly. He will is to be instructed to proceed, as soon as possible to Harper’s ferry, and put himself under the orders of Major Cass. With great consideration I am Sir Yr. ob. Servant ( Df , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown and H,...
An order was issued, some time since, as you will recollect, directing enlistments to be “for and during the existing differences with France,” or for the term of five years at the pleasure of the government. It appearing probable that the number of men enlisted under these conditions is very inconsiderable, and an expectation having been entertained among them that they would not be separated...
Upon the receipt of your letter of the 21st, I sent a copy of it to General Hamilton, and the original to Mr. McHenry, and asked their candid opinion of it, without favor or affection. From General Hamilton I have as yet received no answer. From Mr. McHenry I have the inclosed, which is, I believe, a very honest answer; and, although I am not of his opinion in all points, I think there is...
The enclosed is a copy of a memorandum, signed by the Clerk of the War Office, was handed to me this morning by Mr. Vrooman—by it, it appears that notice of his acceptance was received at the War Office the 15th. Jany. since when which time he States himself to have been in readiness to join his Regiment. You will have his name entered on the Pay and Muster Rolls accordingly— With great...
Mr. Brown, one of my Secretaries is the bearer of this letter—he goes before me to take possession of my quarters. You will have a Subaltern’s guard at those quarters on Wednesday next. With great consideration Df , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For H’s visit to the troops at Scotch Plains, New Jersey, see H to Aaron Ogden, May 8, 1800, note 1 .
The enclosed warrant for Nathaniel Baldwin as Cadet in the 12th. regiment has just been sent to me by the S of War. You will direct Mr. Baldwin to transmit his former appointment to the War Office. (two drafts, both in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Altho’ I have not been officially advised of it, yet I have received information sufficient to satisfy me that an act of Congress has passed for disbanding the twelve additional regiments on or before the fifteenth of June next, granting an allowance to the officers and soldiers of three months pay from the time of their discharge. I mention this to you that it may be understood unofficially...