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I thank you for your for two Letters from the Valley; one dated October 4th. the other November the first, 1815. The Documents to which you refer are of so much Importance to your Reputation and to mine, that I wish you would depose it, the Sketch you have made of them, somewhere in print. It is at my Age impossible for me to look up the Scattered Volumes in which they are to be found and my...
Cobbets Letter to Niles, inclosed in yours of the 17th, with some of his usual fooleries, contains many important facts and ingenious reflections, Sometimes lear I love Clergimen because they are often Sociable and Sensible Men, and sometimes learned: but the Priesthood Seems to have Something militant and belligerent in its nature. The high ones are always gladiators. Their Controversies are...
Washington used to say Sometimes “They work me hard” Sam. Allen Otis said a day or two before his Death “They work me two hard” And I who have not the Honor to be “ Father of my Country” nor Secretary of the Senate, might now say in my Octoginary year, that John Taylor and a dozen others, some of them greater and some of them less Men, now work me confoundedly hard: but I will not say it. I...
I rejoice in your Recovery from Sickness and wish a perfect restoration of your health—I think I may Congratulate you on the Glorious termination of the War. The Rejoicings here are enthusiastic, If Such Rejoicings here are at my Peace with France in 1800, had been Exhibited, would the Condition of our Country at this hour however have been better? Tallard when he had been beaten and taken...
It is sometime since I have written to you and I feel that I owe you a Letter; you do not like our state movement any better than I do the long and and numerous Speeches of your wordy Fraternity. yet I like to read them, and when the character of the Gentleman is preserved, and due respect paid to constituted Authorities, I listen to the opposite Parties with pleasure, but I must say too many...
I thank you for your favour of the 23d.— Gerry is gone to joine his Copatriots in lamentations over the degeneracy of his Country; at least in Sagadahock, Nantucket and Alexandria. I am, left alone, to carry the last and worst tidings to the Skies. What Shall I? What can I say of Mr Gerry’s Family? An amiable Wisdom and nine amiable Children. I can say no more— MHi : Adams Family Papers,...
Yesterday I received your packet of the 7th. you ask “What is to be the result of the Convention at Hartford?” What a question! Had you asked my opinion of the measure I would have said, it is neither wise, honorable, or virtuous; and I would have requested you to give my compliments to every Virginian you meet, high or low, and tell him, that Massachusetts deserves to be made to repent of it...
It is already three weeks since you left us; I have not any knowledge of your progress farther than New-Haven, where General Humphreys informed me that he had the pleasure of meeting you. I wish to hear form you, although I cannot expect that you have anything agreeable of a public nature to communicate, from the desolate walls of Washington. I will, however, turn my face from that forlorn...
Your letter of 2 April I duly received I Should have replied to it by the last mail, but I was not in a humour at that time. I therefore d eclined it, hoping that the next post would be more Satisfactory to me, and account for a delay which did not correspond with former professions. it has accordingly brought Such explanations as an fully Satisfactory to all concernd —oweing to the delay of...
I received your Letter of March the 12th in replie to mine, of the 2d ult. the method you took to inform yourself respecting the Character and circumstances of the person in Question was highly judicious and the return you received, very Satisfactory and pleasing. the terms you have exa c ted met my cordial approbation. I should perhaps, had it been left to me have prolonged the time of...