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    • Adams, John
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    • Smith, William Stephens

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Smith, William Stephens"
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I thank you for your favour of the 23d.— Gerry is gone to joine his Copatriots in lamentations over the degeneracy of his Country; at least in Sagadahock, Nantucket and Alexandria. I am, left alone, to carry the last and worst tidings to the Skies. What Shall I? What can I say of Mr Gerry’s Family? An amiable Wisdom and nine amiable Children. I can say no more— MHi : Adams Family Papers,...
I have appointed you Surveyor & Inspector, in the place of Mr. Lasher who has resigned. Your commission has been made out & delivered by the Secretary of State to the Secretary of the Treasury, who I presume has sent it to you, before now, but if by any accident, it has happened that you have not received it, you may enter immediately on the execution of the office & depend on receiving your...
I received last night your favor of the 18 & congratulate you on the receipt of your commission. You will do well to make a digest of the laws of the revenue, remembering Lord Cokes opinion, that abridgments are most useful to the makers of them. I have great relyance on your vigilance, activity & fidelity in the service. I know not whether your office corresponds with the Secretary of the...
I have been sick a Month, and my eyes and hands incapable of writing otherise you would have heard more from me. Your favor of 18 Feby. arrived yesterday. Thanks for the Gazette. Well may you and I be perplexed in our calculations on post scenes and present unpleasant prospects, relative to the interior of the political state of Europe, and the interior & exterior aspect of our own national...
I know not what to say to your Letter of 23rd. There are Men whom disaster haunts through life. Sinclair was one & Wilkinson is another. With apparent capacities and without any manifest guilt, nothing ever succeeds in their hands. To cover the blunders of the war, recourse must be had to the blunders and intrigues and corruptions in politics, from the commencement of the Revolution and long...
I go farther than you in your Glooms I expect Detroit and Michigan will be again taken and all Perry fleet taken or burned How far you go in your hopes of Peace I know not. Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes. Romans would not treat in adversity neither Gauls nor Hannibal, could intimidate Rome, nor terrify any one to pronounce the word Peace. America asleep and Britain awake thro the winter may...
I have received your favor of the 23d of last month and read with pleasure, your account of the celebration of the 22d, according to my proclamation. A public prayer was very proper, but who was your chaplain? I have had some anxiety on that account. An unhappy, unfortunate gentleman may excite more levity, than reverence among the soldiery.— An emminent character and example of public virtue...
I have received your favor of the 2d & one or two letters before, recommending gentlemen to office. I am obliged by these communications & wish not to discourage you from continuing to give me information upon such subjects. If your recommendations should not be successfull, you will know the reason to be, that some other candidate presents with superior public claims. You mention not the...
Upon the receipt of your letter of the 21st, I sent a copy of it to General Hamilton, and the original to Mr. McHenry, and asked their candid opinion of it, without favor or affection. From General Hamilton I have as yet received no answer. From Mr. McHenry I have the inclosed, which is, I believe, a very honest answer; and, although I am not of his opinion in all points, I think there is...
Your letters give us information as well as entertainment. Your reception at head Quarters & at the war office, augur well for the public. It is impossible that your ideas, your conversation, can be wholly lost to either Dearborne is really to be pitied. He is worn down and tormented by the disease that humbled the great spirit of Louis 14th; not to mention the misfortunes of the first year of...