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    • Adams, John
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    • Smith, William Stephens
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    • Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Smith, William Stephens" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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I have been sick a Month, and my eyes and hands incapable of writing otherise you would have heard more from me. Your favor of 18 Feby. arrived yesterday. Thanks for the Gazette. Well may you and I be perplexed in our calculations on post scenes and present unpleasant prospects, relative to the interior of the political state of Europe, and the interior & exterior aspect of our own national...
Your Letter of the 5th. contains Such an Abundance of Matter which appears to me as of so great importance, that I really was under a temptation to Commit a violation of private and family Confidence by inclosing the original directly to the President. But the Appointment of General Armstrong to the War Office, has rendered Such a desperate Step unnecessary. Whether the new Secretary is your...
I know not what to say to your Letter of 23rd. There are Men whom disaster haunts through life. Sinclair was one & Wilkinson is another. With apparent capacities and without any manifest guilt, nothing ever succeeds in their hands. To cover the blunders of the war, recourse must be had to the blunders and intrigues and corruptions in politics, from the commencement of the Revolution and long...
I have received, and read with—Sensations of grief and joy and Reflections of, (what shall I say approbation and disapprobation or of pride and humiliation? ) the Letter you wrote me on the 5th with all its enclosed papers. There seems to be, an irreversable decree against me, and every Being who has a drop of my blood in his or her Veins. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men Which taken at...
I go farther than you in your Glooms I expect Detroit and Michigan will be again taken and all Perry fleet taken or burned How far you go in your hopes of Peace I know not. Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes. Romans would not treat in adversity neither Gauls nor Hannibal, could intimidate Rome, nor terrify any one to pronounce the word Peace. America asleep and Britain awake thro the winter may...
Yesterday I received your packet of the 7th. you ask “What is to be the result of the Convention at Hartford?” What a question! Had you asked my opinion of the measure I would have said, it is neither wise, honorable, or virtuous; and I would have requested you to give my compliments to every Virginian you meet, high or low, and tell him, that Massachusetts deserves to be made to repent of it...
I received yesterday your favour of the 16th of last month. It is of no other use to ruminate upon the faults, Errors, and blunders of Congress and Washington in the revolutionary War, or upon those of Congress and Jefferson or Congress and Madison during the last twelve years; than to derive wisdom from their costly experience, and rectify our counsels and correct the conduct of our arms for...
Your letters give us information as well as entertainment. Your reception at head Quarters & at the war office, augur well for the public. It is impossible that your ideas, your conversation, can be wholly lost to either Dearborne is really to be pitied. He is worn down and tormented by the disease that humbled the great spirit of Louis 14th; not to mention the misfortunes of the first year of...
Cobbets Letter to Niles, inclosed in yours of the 17th, with some of his usual fooleries, contains many important facts and ingenious reflections, Sometimes lear I love Clergimen because they are often Sociable and Sensible Men, and sometimes learned: but the Priesthood Seems to have Something militant and belligerent in its nature. The high ones are always gladiators. Their Controversies are...
I thank you for your favour of the 23d.— Gerry is gone to joine his Copatriots in lamentations over the degeneracy of his Country; at least in Sagadahock, Nantucket and Alexandria. I am, left alone, to carry the last and worst tidings to the Skies. What Shall I? What can I say of Mr Gerry’s Family? An amiable Wisdom and nine amiable Children. I can say no more— MHi : Adams Family Papers,...