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ALS : National Archives I have just received the enclos’d Letters by the Chevalier Kermorvan. By the Conversation I have had with him he appears to me skilful in his Profession. I hope in a few days to be strong enough to come to town and attend my Duty in Congress. In the mean time, I could wish you to introduce the Gentleman where it may be proper, and that you would translate the Passage...
LS : Yale University Library I take the Liberty of introducing to your Acquaintance the Bearer Mr. Redford, because I am persuaded that I shall therein do you a Pleasure. His Character you will find in an enclos’d Letter to me from Dr. Price. I hope his Reception in our Country will be such as to make it agreable to him and induce him to settle among us; as from the short Acquaintance I have...
ALS : Dartmouth College Library It has been a great Pleasure to me to hear occasionally from others, that you were closely engag’d in your Studies, and distinguishing yourself by the Progress you made in them. I promise my self that you will return with such a Stock of useful Knowledge as will render you an Ornament to your Country; and that I shall have no reason to regret the Appearance of...
ALS : Yale University Library This will be delivered to you by Dr. Ross, who is strongly recommended to me by Persons of Distinction in England, and who, after travelling over a great Part of the World, wishes to fix himself for the rest of his Life in America. You will find him a very ingenious sensible Man, and be pleas’d with his Conversation: and you will therefore excuse my requesting for...
ALS : Yale University Library M. du Trône, who will have the Honour of presenting you this Line, is recommended to me by very respectable Persons, as a young Gentleman of excellent Character, who goes to America with Views of residing there some Years, and practising Chemistry. I beg leave to recommend him to your Protection and good Counsels, and to those Civilities you delight in showing to...
Reprinted from Parke-Bernet sale catalogue, February 27–28, 1974, item 265. The Bearer M. Tessier, is well recommended to me as a Person of good Character and an excellent Surgeon, who purposes to go to America and offer his Services in our Armies. Having no Orders to send Surgeons thither, I could give him no kind of Encouragement by Promises of Employment or otherways. He therefore goes of...
ALS : Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia This letter of introduction is the initial appearance in Franklin’s correspondence of a young man who later became important to him, first as his editor and then as Shelburne’s emissary during the peace negotiations of 1782. Benjamin Vaughan (1751–1835) was the eldest son of Samuel Vaughan, a wealthy English merchant with interests in...
ALS : Mrs. Elizabeth Mifflin Boyd, Chestnut Hill, Pa. (1955); AL (draft): Library of Congress This will be delivered to you by Mr. Archer, a young Gentleman of excellent Character, whose Zeal for the Cause of Liberty, and strong Desire of being serviceable to it and to our Country, with those Qualities of Mind and Acquirements that lay the best Foundation for his really becoming so, will I am...
ALS : Yale University Library; letterbook draft: American Philosophical Society I am favoured with yours of June 24. and shall as it is my Duty endeavour to obtain the Royal Assent to every Act passed by our Assembly; and to that you recommend, the more particularly as I think it reasonable in itself, and connected with Liberty of Conscience a Fundamental of our Constitution. But I am doubtful...
Reprinted from The Pennsylvania Packet, And General Advertiser, June 29, 1784; copy: Bibliothèque de Genève I do not know who is at present secretary of our philosophical society, and therefore I address to you, who read French, a book lately published here, which gives an account of one of the most extraordinary discoveries that this age has produced, by which men are enabled to rise in the...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library; letterbook draft: Library of Congress In a Box to Mr. Bache I send you a Bundle of the Ephemerides; they came but lately to hand with Duplicates for me; tho’ it appears by my Letter that they were sent from Paris last May was twelvemonth. Where they have been all this time I have not learnt. I send you also one of Dr. Priestly’s Pamphlets, containing a...
Letter not found. 3 May 1790. Offered for sale in the Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 468, May 1943.
I recieved last night your friendly letter of the 12th. which shall be answered the first practicable moment. in the mean time I send you Latude which I happen to have here. affectionate salutations. RC (Swann Auction Catalogue, sale 2058, New York, 2005); address clipped: “Doctr. Benjamin [Rush]”; franked and postmarked.
26 June 1794. Encloses Heinrich Matthias Marcard’s letter to GW of 5 Aug. 1793, which GW gave to Randolph "with a request that I should answer it." As Marcard’s letter takes "distinguished notice" of Rush and "opens the way for some other pen, than an official one," to respond, Randolph asks Rush to reply to the letter. LB , DNA : RG 59, Domestic Letters. Rush wrote Randolph on 27 June that he...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Dr. Rush and will be happy if he can take a dinner with him in the country with a small party of friends on Friday at three aclock.—He presumes Dr. Rush knows that his house is on this side the river 3, or 400 yds. below Grey’s ferry. RC (J. William Middendorf, Jr., Baltimore, 1949); addressed: “Dr. Rush.” Not recorded in SJL .
ALS : Yale University Library; letterbook draft: American Philosophical Society I received your Favour of May 14. with the very ingenious Oration you deliver’d at the Society, for which I thank you. The Bookseller you had likewise sent it to (Mr. Dilly) being desirous of Dr. Huck’s Opinion and mine as to its Publication, we had, after separately reading it, a little Consultation upon it; the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have already written to you as a Friend by this Conveyance. I now write to you as one of the Secretaries of our Philosophical Society, who understands French, to request your Attention to the enclos’d Papers, and that you would translate them for the Use of the Society. In this Ship, Capt. Falconer, I send a Box, containing a Number of Presents for the...
Your favour of the 26th ulto together with the seeds of the manget werzel and the Pamphlet respecting the cultivation and use of this valuable plant, came safe and claims my particular acknowledgments. I thank you for both, and shall endeavor to propogate the former with care and attention. Mrs Washington Joins me in compliments to Mrs Rush. I am Sir &c. LB , DLC:GW . The copyist should have...
… Your hint as to addresses from the H. of Rep. to the National Assembly was perfectly new. I am far from thinking that such a measure might not be formed as [to] do credit to this Country and good to both…. Printed extract (Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 468, “The Alexander Biddle Papers” [1943], pt. 1, item 151). See PJM Robert J. Brugger et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison: Secretary of...
ALS : Yale University Library; letterbook draft: Library of Congress I received your Favour of May 1. with the Pamphlet for which I am obliged to you. It is well written. I hope in time that the Friends to Liberty and Humanity will get the better of a Practice that has so long disgrac’d our Nation and Religion. A few Days after I receiv’d your Packet for M. Dubourg, I had an Opportunity of...
Letter not found. 18 December 1810, Washington. Offered for sale in Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 484, “The Alexander Biddle Papers” (1943), pt. 2, item 202, which notes that the one-page letter of about one hundred words “regards his nephew who was ill, and is consoled that he is receiving the attention of Dr. Rush and Dr. Physick.”
Letter not found. 23 December 1801, Washington. Offered for sale in Parke-Bernet Catalogue No. 484, “The Alexander Biddle Papers” (1943), pt. 2, item 200, which notes that the one-page letter “regards Dr. Rush’s son Richard who desired to visit Europe in the capacity of a private secretary to one of the American Ministers. Informs him that he will place the matter before the President.”
[ Treasury Department, August 13, 1792. The dealer’s catalogue description of this letter reads: “Respecting proposed method for obtaining fresh water from salt water.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., May 24, 1943, Lot 117. Rush, who had been a member of the Pennsylvania Ratifying Convention, was a prominent Philadelphia physician and philanthropist. He was...
I should not so soon have troubled you with a reply to your friendly favor of Mar. 15. but for your saying that ‘if I wish to look into your work on the diseases of the mind you will send me a copy.’ I read with delight every thing which comes from your pen, and the subject of this work is peculiarly interesting. the book by Bishop Porteous which you were so kind as to inclose me, was safely...
I have recd. with great Pleasure your Letters of 22d. April and 19. March. These important Letters I have not yet had time to answer, but the subjects of them shall be well weighed. I write this to introduce a Neighbour of mine, in Braintree, Captn. Benjamin Beal who is desirous of seeing Philadelphia for the first time. He was born and bred my Neighbour, has followed the sea many years and...
I received your two favours one of 9 and the other of 13th. I am sorry that you should have felt yourself so wounded tho to be assailed in the house of our Friends is a calamity of the bitterest kind; the President has had no common share of it in this State. Those who have been firm supporters of the administration of Washington, whose voices and pens have uniformly been employed in h olding...
I do not know if you may have noticed in the Newspapers of a year or two ago that Edward Livingston had brought a suit against me for a transaction of the Executive while I was in the administration. the dismission of it has been the occasion of publishing the inclosed pamphlet, which is sent to you, not to be read, for there is nothing enticing for you in it, but as a tribute of respect &...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. came to hand last night. the embarrasment of answering propositions for office negatively, and the inconveniencies which have sometimes arisen from answering affirmatively, even when the affirmative is intended, has led to the general rule of leaving the answer to be read in the act of appointment or non-appointment whenever either is manifested. I depart from the...
I acknowledge my fault in neglecting to answer two or three of your last favours. I now thank you for the Letters and the “Light and Truth” as I ought used to call the Aurora. What are We to think of all these Adventurers? Tom Paine, Cobbet Duane Carpenter, Walsh, Bristed? with twenty &cas. Are they all Sent out here, by Administration or opposition, French or English, Scotch or Irish? Our...
This will be delivered you by my grandson Th Jefferson Randolph, who goes to Philadelphia to attend a course of lectures in Natural history Anatomy & Botany. he will also attend the lecturer in Surgery, but as an amateur, and with a view to the care of a family when he shall have one, in a country situation where we have no surgeons & want them every day. he may then recollect and apply what...
I cannot give up my dear Latin and Greek although Fortune has never permitted me to enjoy so much of them as I wished. I don’t love you the less however for your Indifference or even opposition to them. Pray do you carry your Theory so far as to wish to exclude French, Italian, Spanish, and Tudesque? I begun to fear that your multiplied phisical and other engagements had made you forget me....
you will I hope pardon the Liberty I have taken to address myself to you Sir upon a Subject which has become very interesting to myself. since I have been on a visit to my Parents, I have met with a volume of your Medical inquiries, in which are containd some observations upon the use of Arsenic in the cure of Cancers and schirrous complaints— about May 1810 I first perceived a hardness in my...
Th: Jefferson being engaged in packing his books will thank Dr. Rush for the volumes lent him if he had done with them. He presents him his best compliments. Douignan de la vie humaine. 2. vols. Compendium of Physic. RC ( DLC : Rush Papers); addressed: “Dr. Rush”; endorsed by Rush. Not recorded in SJL . The first book TJ requested was Guillaume Daignan, Tableau des Variétés de la Vie humaine...
No one would more willingly than myself pay the just tribute due to the services of Capt Barry , by writing a letter of condolance to his widow as you suggest. but when one undertakes to administer justice it must be with an even hand, & by rule, what is done for one, must be done for every one in equal degree. to what a train of attentions would this draw a President? how difficult would it...
Your friendly letter of Mar. 12. was recieved in due time and with a due sense of it’s value. I shall with confidence avail myself of it’s general prescription, and of the special should the state of my health alter for the worse. at present it wears a promising aspect. At length I send you a letter, long due, and even now but a sketch of what I wished to make it. but your candour will find my...
I have been favd with yours of the 26th December. Soon after the Rect I had an opportunity of communicating the substance of it, and one from Govr Livingston on the same subject, to the Director General. It is to be regretted, that a department for which such ample provision has been made, and on which so much depends, should yet be inadequate to the ends proposed. If the present medical...
I duly recd. the two pamphlets which you were so obliging as to inclose me; and had hoped ere this to have had the pleasure of reading them. From a glance at a few pages of the one on the Judiciary subject, I perceive that is very handsomely written at least. The subject of the other I have no doubt is handled in the elegant and philosophical manner so familiar to the pen of the Author. It is...
Shall I congratulate or condole with you on the appointment of your Son to be Comptroller of The Treasury? You will know the delightful Comfort of his daily Society and that of his Lady and their prattling Little ones, which I know by Experience to be in old age, among the Sweetest Enjoyment of Life, provided Always that it be not indulged to excess. I Should have thought too that his Office...
I recd. your favor of the 10th. instant some days ago. Altho’ I feel the force of many of your remarks, I can not embrace the idea to which they lead. It would not be consistent with the view I have taken of the subject; nor indeed promise any chance of success agst. the present politics of the House. The Petitions on the subject of Slavery have employed more than a week, and are still before...
I recd. in course yours of the 7th. Fox was a remarkable Character. I admire the Morsell of History. Pitt was another. he has left nothing but speeches taken down by stenographers. I cannot pronounce either of them wise statesmen: yet perhaps they were as wise as they could be in their Circumstances. Great Men they both were, most certainly. Pitt I think was more correct in his Knowledge of...
I have been prevented from acknowledging, as soon as I could have wished, your kind favor of the 13th. inst. Under the circumstances my fellow Citizens have thought proper to place me, it is particularly grateful to me, to enjoy the good wishes of the most enlightened and virtuous among them: and above all of those whose long and personal acquaintance gives peculiar value to their favorable...
Your Letters are not apt to lie a month unacknowledged. That of May 5th. is before me since which I have recd. an Aurora under your envellope. I thank you for both. Thanks too for your sons inaugural Dissertation. I wish him success in his studies Travels and Practice. May he become as eminent, as skilful, as humane, as virtuous and as successful as his father. I rejoice that your son Richard...
Sobrius esto! Recollect your own Non Nobis! Your Letter of the 20th. of September I communicated to Mrs Adams as you advised. Mrs Adams to her Daughter, After a reasonable Time for Deliberation and Reflections the Heroine determined. The Mother and the Daughter went to Boston and consulted Dr Warren Junior, Dr Welsh, Dr Warren Junior having previously consulted Dr Tufts and Dr Holbrook. The...
Bacon the great Bacon was fond of Paradoxes. What could The Old Hunks mean by Great Men having neither Ancestors nor Posterity? Was not Isaac the son and Jacob the Grand son and Joseph the Great Grandson of Abraham? Was not Julius Cæsar the Posterity of the Anchises and Eneas? Was not King William the Posterity of the Great William Prince of orange and of the still greater Admiral Coligni? Was...
I thank you for the Trouble you have kindly taken in procuring the Samples of Coins for my Son J. Q. A; which Mr Quincy was so good as to deliver with his own hand: and am glad to learn from your Letter that Mr Erving in behalf of my Son T. B. A, has paid you the Amount of them. I thank you for your Letter of the 4th of March and your Congratulations on the Appointment of my Son to a Seat on...
I have read Dr Rush, de moribus Germanorum, with pleasure. As I am a great lover of paradoxes, when defended with ingenuity, I have read also the Phillippic against Latin and Greek, with some amusement: but my reverence for those Languages, and the inestimable treasures hoarded up in them is not abated. Jean Jaques Rousseau’s phillippic against the arts and sciences amused informed and charmed...
I rejoice to find that Pensilvania has returned to reason and Duty in the affair of the Miss Writtenhouses. Our Massachusetts Legislature have not gone So far as yours did: but they have gone too far. I rejoice too at the Honourable Acquittal of your worthy Brother, but lament the Allarming Attack upon the choicest Institution of Liberty the Tryal by Jury. Without this there can be no legal...
I am indebted to you, for more Letters than I can repay at present. But declaring myself a Bankrupt, You must except of a few shillings in the Pound. Indeed I suspect the Debt is greater than I know of. I saw in the Courier de L’Europe, Part of a Letter from you to Dr. Dubourg, which was intercepted, in which you refer him to me for a long Letter you wrote me upon our military affairs &c. But...
Your Letter to Waterhouse inclosed in yours of the 16th. Shall be Sent tomorrow. With them came the News of the Hornets Glory. If Our Nation had as much Religion as Jews or Gentiles, they would consider these Victories as a Revelation of the Importance and Necessity of a maritime defence. Lawrence is now enrolled with Hull, Decatur, Jones Bainbridge in the Record of our Naval Conquerors....
I recieved yesterday your kind favor of the 4th. inst. and the eulogium it covered on the subject of our late invaluable friend Rittenhouse, and I perused it with the avidity and approbation which the matter and manner of every thing from your pen has long taught me to feel. I thank you too for your congratulations on the public call on me to undertake the 2d. office in the US. but still more...