Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Thomas Mann"
Results 31-60 of 237 sorted by date (ascending)
Your waggon with Suck and Critta set off from here on Wednesday the 13th. By the time they got to Pouncey’s hill they found the roads so deep that they could not get along. They returned to Edgehill and carried the greatest part of their load to Milton to be sent down by water. Since that such floods of rain have fallen, and the river so risen that all communication has been cut off for some...
We are all well here. Jefferson was never in finer health. Tho’ our winter has on the whole been a fine one, we have had some severe weather. This morning the thermometer was at 1°¾ above nought; I never before saw it below 6°. in this state. The wind has got Southwardly and promises a change. Corn is a very scarce article in our neighborhood. My crop of it fell vastly short of even moderate...
Your two favors of Jan. 24. and Feb. 3. are both recieved. We have had a very fine winter a few days only excepted about the middle of January. This day sennight was the coldest morning ever known in this country as far as my observations have gone. The mercury was at 1¾°. I never before saw it lower than 6°. in Virginia.—From what I hear of the state of the three notched road I am sorry I...
The last post brought us your favor of the 17th. My nail machine with the hoop iron is safe arrived by Faris as also my wine by Billy. The roads were so bad that he was obliged to put out the rest of his load at Elisha Lake’s about 20. miles above Richmond. I shall get Colo. Bell to engage some waggon to bring them up. Robertson has fallowed about 100 acres. He has done the rich nole, and is...
All are well here and at Edgehill. The most remarkeable fact in our neighborhood is the marriage of Capt. Allcock to Mrs. Walker, widow of Dr. Walker. I have no information of the last week’s work at Edgehill. Mine was never more backward. Petit is entirely ruined by Milton. He is 40. or 50. acres behind Page in his ploughing. He is not more than half done the wheat fallowing; tho’ we have had...
All are well here: Jefferson particularly so. Almost immediately after the receipt of your order to pay Mr. Divers 120. D. and before I could give him notice, he went to Richmond, and returned only 3 days ago. I saw him yesterday and told him how long I had had your order to pay him that sum, which had been in constant readiness for him, and was still so. He appeared perfectly satisfied. I...
Your’s of the 16th. inst. from Richmd. came to hand last night. I believe it would be better to do without herrings till the new season, even if we could get them, considering the price. I have recieved no advice of any port wine having been sent to me by any body, and I never ordered any. If that delivered Mr. Brown be really addressed to me, you are welcome to it, and in every case to do...
Your favor of the 20th. is received. It is not in my power to forward the land warrants for my certificates, as Clarke did not return them to me. I question if the surveyor returned them to him. I shall write to him by the next post, but you will be here before he can answer. He writes me that he put 300. ℔ tobacco of mine into a hhd. of yours. This may enter into our general account if you...
I did not write to you by the last post because I expected you would be on the road; but as I find this will reach you in time I will ask the favor of you to bring me the certificate from Byrd’s warehouse relative to the 2. hhds. of tobacco T W C. mentioned in your’s of the 6th. inst. It will be extremely material to be brought on Cobbs by surprize, because they consider Colo. Bell’s...
I have not written to you by the last posts expecting you would be on the road. Your last seems to suppose you may still recieve this at Richmond. The lad whom you mention to have eloped from Varina is at Edgehill. My groceries, and rope are arrived at Charlottesville. We had in the mean time fallen on an easy and quick method of taking down our columns, which was but the work of one day. I...
I received your favor from Staunton , and was happy to learn that your journey was agreeing with you. All here are well. Mr. and Mrs. D. Randolph left us the day before yesterday for the springs. Mr. Hurt yesterday, after putting our clocks into very good order. Robertson informs me he has got out about 500. bushels of wheat, and supposes himself half done. He goes on with his fallows at the...
We are all well, and nothing new in our neighborhood. I have not heard from Edgehill this week. My threshing machine will only get to work this afternoon. Mr. W. Hylton senr. who called here on his way to the springs, tells me he has information in a letter from Sr. George Strickland that 2. steers will get out 120. bushels of wheat a day with it. This is encoraging. You will be astonished to...
It is so cold that the freezing of the ink on the point of my pen renders it difficult to write. We have had the thermometer at 12°. My works are arrested in a state entirely unfinished, and I fear we shall not be able to resume them. Clarke has sold our wheat in Bedford for 8/6 and the rise to the 1st. of June, with some other modifications. It appears to be a good sale. He preferred it to...
Yours of the 4th. inst. is duly recieved, and I rejoice that you got down without any accident from the cold, of which I had great apprehensions. The following is extracted from my diary to satisfy the wish you express to know what has been the degree of cold here. sunrise 3. P.M. sunrise Dec. 19. 50°. 48. Jan. 1. 30. 43 20. 19.  2. 28. 33 21.
Yours of the 11th. came to hand yesterday. We are all well here. Anne’s cold still continues, tho it gives no fever nor other inconvenience. Maria is also well notwithstanding a tumble thro’ the floor into the cellar, from which she escaped miraculously without hurt. You ask for news, yet I think it impossible but you must get it from Richmond before you could from hence. The last Northern...
All well here and in expectation of seeing you on Sunday next. Dr. Taylor has enjoined my judgments against him for delay. The pretext is that I have refused to execute a deed to him for Elkhill . But I never was so mistaken if I did not by his direction reacknolege the former deed before the clerks of the General court in Richmond on the 4th. of June 1794. or within a very few days after...
Yours has been duly recieved , and the clover seed goes tomorrow in the schooner Industry, Capt. Green bound for Richmond. It is addressed to Chas. Johnston, and is in 3. casks containing 3 1/8 bushels each, of which 4. bushels are for yourself and the rest for me. It will be desireable to have it forwarded immediately, and of preference by waggon. I shall be at home the 19th. or 20th. and...
I arrived at home on the 20th. inst. and found the cherry and peach trees in general blossom. They had begun about a week before that. This day our first dishes of asparagus and spinach came to table. This may enable you to compare climates. The price of wheat at Philadelphia and Baltimore was 2.13 D. at Alexandria and Dumfries 1.67 at Fredericksburg 1.16. The merchants of Philadelphia and...
Yours of Mar. 31. did not come to hand till the 5th. inst. It is a pity it had not been recieved before the election , as it gave much uneasiness and embarrasment to your friends to be unable to give any account of you. It made a serious impression even on the zealous; and I have this day written a circular letter , with the apologies your letter furnished, addressed to every militia captain...
Among the multiplicity of things I had to think of on my departure from home I omitted to speak with you on the subject of the cask of beer you were so kind as to put by for me at Hay’s. I will thank you to have it bottled and sent up. At this moment C. Johnston has no money of mine in his hands. Therefore I have given Mr. Hay (whom I met with here) money for the bottles, and immediately on my...
I inclose you a copy of the President’s speech. Before that was delivered the dispositions of all the members from every quarter seemed averse from war. But that disposition appears to be changing, and those are taking the hue of the speech who wish the Executive to be the sole power in the government. The Republican interest has lost by the changes in the last election , particularly by those...
Nothing new has occurred this week, except that prices get duller. Embargo is also now beginning to be talked of, and I begin to fear I shall not get the price for my tobacco which I have held it at. Ten dollars may perhaps be yet had, tho’ I have been afraid to ask the fact lest it should be thought a symptom of my falling. No judging yet when Congress will rise as the Representatives have...
Your’s of May 24. is recieved, and I have directed the springs to be made according to your desire. Your other commissions shall also be executed with pleasure, and shall go with some things of mine in the course of this month. Your tobacco is not yet arrived. Mr. Johnston’s express directions to ensure has induced us to do it: otherwise, considering the safety of the season I should have...
I have scarcely a moment left to write to you, having waited till the morning of the departure of the post to see Barnes in expectation I could inform you of the sale of our tobacco . Your’s arrived yesterday. I had found it safest to sell for 10. Dol. as no more than 9 1/2 D. has been given for new tobacco and Lieper would not take it, as he formerly did, at the old tobacco price, giving a...
It was expected the last week that we might have risen on Saturday next. Those expectations are now pushed off to Saturday the 24th. and perhaps it may be even later than that. I conclude however that instead of sending off my chair and horses on Saturday the 24th. as I had desired, they must set out on Wednesday the 28th. so as to be at Fredericksburg Thursday evening of the 29th. This will...
The Senate have this day thrown out their own bill for raising 15,000 men as a provisional army. I think they will also reject the bill for permitting private ships to arm. The Representatives rejected the bill from the Senate for raising artillery, and have this day by resolution proposed to the Senate to adjourn on Wednesday the 28th. Under present appearances I may by possibility be 3. or...
The day of adjournment walks before us like our shadow. It will not take place till the 3d. or 4th. of July. Consequently I shall not be at home till the 10th. or 11th.—Yours of the 19th. inst. came to hand on the 27th. We still go on undoing what in the beginning of the session had been too ardently begun. A bill to authorize the President to lay embargoes, brought into the Senate, has been...
I arrived here on the 8th. day of my journey from Belmont, having suffered much with the severity of the weather, and taken moreover a violent cold which still indisposes me. Not so much however as to prevent my attendance on business, and it is going off. The Senate had as yet only a single bill before them, so that I found myself in place in time for business. They have since received and...
I am in hopes you are by this time in the regular reciept of Bache’s papers; and in a few days you may expect the Chronicle from Boston, both are to begin Jan. 1. so that your year may end always at a marked period. tho we hear nothing official from our envoys at Paris, yet the rumors are very unfavorable. I begin to fear, not war from them, but that they will refuse to have any settlement...
Yours of the 13th. came to hand yesterday, and relieves my anxiety as to the health of the family. I thank you for your interference at Monticello & Shadwell. I had directed the managers at both to apply to you for your counsel when at a loss, and have only been prevented by the state of your health from asking a more onerous attention. George needs to be supported & Page to be moderated. Davy...