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The hour of post is come and a throng of business allows me only to inform you we are well, and to acknolege the receipt of Mr. Randolph’s letter of Jan. 24. With hopes that you are all so accept assurances of constant love to you all from your’s my dear most affectionately RC ( NNP ); at foot of text: “Mrs. Randolph”; endorsed by Mrs. Randolph. PrC ( CSmH ). Tr ( ViU : Edgehill-Randolph...
We are all well here, my ever dear Martha, but I shall not be able probably to set out tomorrow, but shall on Tuesday. we shall be five days on the road. in the mean time the roads will be getting better, & the weather perhaps milder. but indeed it looks as if this winter would run through the summer. not a bud is swelled here yet, except of the red Maple. kiss our dear children for me, and be...
Our neighborhood my dear daughter furnishes us with not one word of news to you, and I am so fatigued with writing for this post that I can only inform you we are all well, Jefferson robust as a beef, and all our desires alive to see you. My kisses to dear Anne, and best affection’s to Mr. Randolph and yourself. Adieu my dear and love me as I do you. RC ( NNPM ); addressed: “Mrs. Martha...
I shall with the greatest pleasure, my dear Patsy, participate with you of the honour of Miss Annesley’s company in our ride this afternoon. Assure her of my thankfulness for it as well as your own. The day being warm, I shall not be with you till between five and six o’clock. Adieu my Dear Your’s affectionately, RC (John R. Burke, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 1956); addressed: “A Mademoiselle...
A death-bed Adieu. Life’s visions are vanished, it’s dreams are no more. Dear friends of my bosom, why bathed in tears? I go to my fathers; I welcome the shore, which crowns all my hopes, or which buries my cares. Then farewell my dear, my lov’d daughter, Adieu! The last pang of life is in parting from you! Two Seraphs await me, long shrouded in death: I will bear them your love on my last...
Mr. De La Borde de Mereville presente ses respects a Miss Jefferson et la prie de venir prendre le thé chez lui vendredi prochain 23, à six heures du soir. RC (Mrs. Nicholas P. T. Burke, Boston, 1947); addressed.
I received three days ago Mr. Randolph’s letter of the 14th. from Richmond, and received it with great joy as it informed me of the reestablishment of dear Anne’s health. I apprehend from an expression in his letter that some of mine may have miscarried. I have never failed to write every Thursday or Friday. Percieving by the Richmond paper that the Western post now leaves that place on...
My journey to this place was not as free from accident as usual. I was near losing Castor in the Rapidan, by his lying down in the river, where waste deep, & being so embarrassed by the shafts of the carriage & harness that he was nearly drowned before the servants, jumping into the water, could lift his head out & cut him loose from the carriage. this was followed by the loss of my travelling...
Mr. Short in a late letter says that your acquaintances in Panthemont complain excessively of your inattention to them and desired him to mention it. Matters there are going on well. The sales of the church lands are succesful beyond all calculation. There has been a riot in Paris in which M. de Castrie’s houshould furniture was destroyed. I am opening my things from Paris as fast as the...
In the instant of the departure of the post Genl. Dearborne calls on me to know the name of a person for whom I applied to be made a Cadet; and I have forgotten the name, & cannot find it on a review of your letters, altho’ I know it was through you that the application came. pray let me know it by return of post; and I will keep the place open a few days. Genl. Dearborne leaves us in a few...
Mr. Bacon delivered your letter & every thing else safely. I had ordered a gross of bottles to be bought: but I will now countermand them. I send on corks by the stage, for I think that water casks should be trusted no longer than necessary. the letter & bundle for Jefferson shall be forwarded. certainly the residue of Buffon ought to be sent on to him to the care of mr Jefferson. when he went...
I have heard that D r Cooper has come on to Richmond , which however I doubt. if so he may possibly have come to Monticello . under this uncertainty where a letter may find him, I inclose one to you for him , with a request to forward it to him by mail wherever he is. I have left it open as it may enable you to judge what to do with it in every case. I left Judge Stuart ’s yesterday after...
I am at length got well of a terrible cold, which I think must have proceeded from the intense cold of the day I left Belmont. It became very bad by the time I got to Baltimore, and has been worse here. However it is now entirely passed off. We are here lounging our time away, doing nothing, and having nothing to do. It gives me great regret to be passing my time so uselessly when it could...
After the departure of my last letter to Mr. Randolph I found the details I had given him respecting the waggon were erroneous. The rise of the river had cut off our communications for several days. I presume it arrived at Varina as soon as my letter. We are all well here. Jefferson particularly so. He is become the finest boy possible. Always in good humor, always amusing himself, and very...
I have nothing interesting to tell you from hence but that we are well, and how much we love you. From Monticello you have every thing to write about which I have any care. How do my young chesnut trees? How comes on your garden? How fare the fruit blossoms &c. I sent to Mr. Randolph, I think, some seed of the Bent-grass which is much extolled. I now inclose you some seed which Mr. Hawkins...
Maria and I are scoring off the weeks which separate us from you. They wear off slowly, but time is sure tho’ slow. Mr. D. Randolph left us three days ago. He went by the way of Presquisle and consequently will not enrapture Mrs. Randolph till the latter end of the month. I wrote to Mr. Randolph sometime ago to desire he would send off Tom Shackleford or Jupiter or any body else on the 1st. of...
My letter by the last post was to mr Randolph, dated May 24. yours of the 12th. inst. did not get to hand till the 29th. so it must have laid by a post somewhere. the receipt of it, by kindling up all my recollections increases my impatience to leave this place & every thing which can be disgusting, for Monticello and my dear family, comprising every thing which is pleasurable to me in this...
I have just recieved information from mr Jefferson that my shipwrecked goods are gone on from Richmond to Monticello (3. casks excepted which he supposes plundered) and that they appear to be in good condition. as a knolege of what gets safe & in good condition will dispense with my sending on a duplicate provision, I have directed mr Bacon to open all the packages & report to me their...
The letter to mr Hackley shall go by a government vessel which sails for Cadiz the 10th. of this month. such a one will sail monthly for Falmouth, Brest, Lisbon & Cadiz during the embargo. this will furnish his friends a regular means of writing to him. Mr. Hackley has nothing to apprehend from mr Meade as the successor to mr. Yznardi. Meade’s intrigues against Yznardi, and his indecent...
I recieved yesterday your letter of the 5th. & mr Randolph’s of the 6th. and I have this morning sent an extract of the latter to mr Nicholas. I sincerely wish it success, but I am afraid mr Carr has been misinformed of mr Patterson’s views, or, which is as likely, that mr Patterson has changed them. he has certainly concluded to settle on a tract of 5. or 600. acres which he gets from mr...
Your last letter come to hand was of May 23. Consequently it is now two months old. Petit arrived here three or four days ago, and accosted me with an assurance that he was come pour rester toujours avec moi. The principal small news he brings is that Panthemont is one of the convents to be kept up for education, that the old Abbess is living, but Madame de Taubenheim dead, that some of the...
My last news from you were conveyed in your letter of May 28. I ascribe this to your present ambulatory life. I hope when you are more in the way of the post, I shall receive letters regularly once a week from one or other of you, as I write regularly once a week myself. In my letter of the last week to Mr. Randolph I mentioned the appearances of a war between England and Spain. We have...
I reached Fredericksburg the day after I left you, and this place on Christmas-day, having (thanks to my pelisse) felt no more sensation of cold on the road than if I had been in a warm bed. nevertheless I got a small cold which brought on an inflammation in the eyes, head ach &c so that I kept within doors yesterday & only took my seat in Senate to-day. I have as yet had little opportunity of...
I have just learned from the Enquirer the death of my old & valuable friend Cathalan of Marseilles, an important loss to me, & at this time particularly requiring attention, as my orders are now on the way to him for the supplies of the year, & the money to pay for them. but I can do nothing without his papers which I request you to send me. in my Cabinet, & in the window on the right of my...
My head has been so full of farming since I have found it necessary to prepare a plan for my manager, that I could not resist the addressing my last weekly letters to Mr. Randolph and boring him with my plans.—Maria writes to you to-day. She is getting into tolerable health, tho’ not good. She passes two or three days in the week with me, under the trees, for I never go into the house but at...
Altho’ this letter which goes by the carts, will not reach you till Monday evening, and that which I shall write you by the post of tomorrow evening will reach you on Monday morning, yet I cannot omit to drop you a line lest any accident should delay that by mail. mr Randolph continues well. eats with appetite sleeps tolerably, reads: and has not had the smallest return of fever since it left...
We have no letter from Monticello since Mr. Randolph’s of Jan. 30. to Maria. However we hope you are all well and that there are letters on the road which will tell us so. Maria writes to-day. Congress will rise on Saturday next, a term which is joyous to all as it affords some relaxation of business to all. We have had the mildest winter ever known, having had only two snows to cover the...
I wrote to mr Randolph on the 9th. & 10th. inst. and yesterday recieved his letter of the 10th. it gave me real joy to learn that Lilly had got a recruit of hands from mr Allen; tho’ still I would not have that prevent the taking all from the nailery who are able to cut, as I desired in mine of the 9th. as I wish Craven’s ground to be got ready for him without any delay. mr Randolph writes me...
I have for some time been sensible I should be detained here longer than I had expected, but could not till now judge how long. Chisolm will finish his work in about 10. days, and it is very essential that I should see the walls covered with their plates, that they may be in a state of preservation. this will keep me 3. or 4. days longer, so that I expect to be here still about a fortnight...
Yours of the 2d came yesterday. I wrote to Mr. Randolph two days ago, but by a bungle of the servant it did not get to the post office in time, so I suppose that and this will get to hand together, and both probably only the evening before I shall reach Monticello. Still should my former one desiring horses, have missed, this will be in time for them to meet me on the road, and relieve mine in...