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Your two last letters are those which have given me the greatest pleasure of any I ever recieved from you. The one announced that you were become a notable housewife, the other a mother. This last is undoubtedly the key-stone of the arch of matrimonial happiness, as the first is it’s daily aliment. Accept my sincere congratulations for yourself and Mr. Randolph. I hope you are getting well,...
I have this day received yours of the 18th. November and sincerely sympathize with you on the state of dear Anne, if that can be called sympathy which proceeds from affection at first hand, for my affections had fastened on her for her own sake and not merely for yours. Still however experience (and that in your own case) has taught me that an infant is never desperate, let me beseech you not...
I was prevented writing to you last week by a bad cold attended with fever: and this week I have nothing to say but that I find myself nearly well, and to repeat the assurances of my love to you. Maria is well, and has come to a resolution to write to you no more. Whether this arises most from resentment or laziness I do not know. Mr. Randolph’s last letter received was of Dec. 29, yours of...
I recieved Anne’s letter by the last post , in which she forgot to mention the health of the family, but I presume it good. I inclose you a medal executed by an artist lately from Europe and who appears to be equal to any in the world. it is taken from Houdon’s bust, for he never saw me. it sells the more readily as the prints which have been offered the public are such miserable caracatures....
I wrote, my dear Martha, by last week’s post to Mr. Randolph. Yesterday I received his of Oct. 31. The fever in Philadelphia has almost entirely disappeared. The Physicians say they have no new infections since the great rains which have fallen. Some previous ones are still to die or recover, and so close this tragedy. I think however the Executive will remain here till the meeting of...
Your’s of the 19. came to hand yesterday. as it says nothing of your health I presume all are well. I recieved yesterday also a letter from Maria of the 18th. she was then well & preparing to go to Eppington, and in about 4. weeks expected to set out for Albemarle. mr Eppes was engaged in his harvest much obstructed by rain, & regretting he had not before deposited Maria at Monticello. I hope...
Your letters of the 20th. and 27th. Feb. as well as Mr. Randolph’s of the same dates, came to hand only yesterday. By this I percieve that your post must be under bad regulation indeed. I am sorry to learn that your garden is dismantled, and yourself thereby discoraged from attention to it. I beg that Mr. Randolph will employ the whole force, he has been so kind as to direct, in repairing the...
I have got so far, my dear Martha, on my way to Philadelphia which place I shall not reach till the day after tomorrow. I have lost one day at Georgetown by the failure of the stages, and three days by having suffered myself to be persuaded at Baltimore to cross the bay and come by this route as quicker and pleasanter. After being forced back on the bay by bad weather in a first attempt to...
I have received two or three letters from you since I wrote last. Indeed my health has been so bad that I have been able scarcely to read, write or do any thing else. Your letters to your aunt and the others shall be forwarded. I hope you will continue to inclose to me every week one for some of your friends in Virginia. I am sorry Mr. Cimetiere cannot attend you, because it is probable you...
Since I wrote last to you, which was on the 24th. of March, I have received yours of March 22. I am indeed sorry to hear of the situation of Walker Gilmer and shall hope the letters from Monticello will continue to inform me how he does. I know how much his parents will suffer, and how much he merited all their affection.—Mrs. Trist has been so kind as to have your calash made, but either by...
The letter you forwarded , my dear Martha, desiring me to attend the Buckingham court of this month, requires an impossibility because that is tomorrow. I Know also that the trial of the question cannot be at the Same court at which the two wills are presented. Time must be given to Summon witnesses, and I Suppose I shall be Served with a Summons notifying the day I must appear.— We have had a...
We have had no letter from you since your arrival at the Warmsprings, but are told you are gone on to the sweet springs. Not knowing how to write to you by post, I take the opportunity of sending this by Dr. Currie.—He has mentioned to me the home-less situation of Nancy Randolph . She is now with Mrs. Carrington. I do not know whether she is on such a footing with Mr. Randolph and yourself as...
I recieved, my dear daughter, your’s of the 13th . by post. I regret extremely the situation of your family, not only for my disappointment here, but for what they are to suffer. I acknolege that, knowing when I came away the measles were in the neighborhood, I saw it was but too possible your visit here would be delayed. as it is, we must agree to the fall visit, and as Maria will be at...
I now inclose you Petit’s statement of the stores sent round to Richmond to the care of Mr. Brown. They sailed from hence yesterday morning, and the winds have been and are so favorable that I dare say they will be in Chesapeak bay tomorrow, ready for the first Southernly breeze to carry them up the river. So that they will probably be at Richmond some days before you receive this. I wrote to...
We had peaches and Indian corn the 12th. instant. When do they begin with you this year?—Can you lay up a good stock of seed-peas for the ensuing summer? We will try this winter to cover our garden with a heavy coat of manure. When earth is rich it bids defiance to droughts, yeilds in abundance and of the best quality. I suspect that the insects which have harassed you have been encouraged by...
I wrote you last on the 26th. of the last month. On the 3d. of the present I received Mr. Randolph’s favor of May 22. I sincerely congratulate you on the arrival of the Mocking bird. Learn all the children to venerate it as a superior being in the form of a bird, or as a being which will haunt them if any harm is done to itself or it’s eggs. I shall hope that the multiplication of the cedar in...
We are well here, tho’ still without news from Mr. Randolph or yourself, tho’ we have been eight weeks from Monticello. Maria was to have written to you to-day, but she has been so closely engaged in pasting paper together in the form of a pocket book that she has not been able. She has been constantly getting colds since she came here. I have put on board Capt Stratton a box with the...
Your’s of the 25th. of April came to hand ten days ago, and yesterday I received Mr. Randolph’s of the 3d. instant. When I wrote to him last week, I hoped to have been soon rid of the periodical headach which had attacked me. It has indeed been remarkeably slight since that, but I am not yet quite clear of it. I expect every fit to be the last. I inclose the newspapers for Mr. Randolph. He...
I have at length found time to copy Petit’s list of the packages sent to Richmond. Tho’ I have not heard of their arrival there, I take for granted they must be arrived. I inclose you the list wherein I have marked with an * the boxes which must remain at Richmond till they can be carried up by water, as to put them into a waggon would be a certain sacrifice of them. They are the Nos. 2. 5....
I was too much occupied to write by Friday’s post and fear it will occasion your recieving my letter a week later. Yours of the 7th. Inst. has come duly to hand. Colo. and Mrs. Monroe will probably be with you by the time you recieve this. Mr. Madison left us last Wednesday. I have promised, during his stay in Orange, to inclose to him Fenno’s paper for his perusal, to be forwarded on to Mr....
I have not received a letter from you since early in February . This is far short of my injunctions to write once a week by post. I wish this for my own gratification as well as for your improvement. I received yesterday letters from Eppington by which I learn that the families there and at Hors du monde are well, and that your cousin Cary has a son. Lucy has been unwell during the winter but...
I have no letter from Monticello later than Maria’s of May 29. which is now six weeks old. This is long, when but one week is necessary for the conveyance. I cannot ascribe all the delay to the Charlottesville post. However to put that out of the way I am negotiating with the postmaster the establishment of a public post from Richmond to Staunton. In this case all the private riders will be...
A promise made to a friend some years ago, but executed only lately, has placed my religious creed on paper. I have thought it just that my family, by possessing this, should be enabled to estimate the libels published against me on this, as on every other possible subject. I have written to Philadelphia for Doctr. Priestley’s history of the corruptions of Christianity, which I will send you,...
Ellen tells me that a request is communicated thro’ M r Randolph & yourself from the Freemason societies of Charlottesville to be permitted to lay the first brick of the Central college . I do not know that I have authority to say either yea or nay to this proposition; but as far as I may be authorised, I consent to it freely. the inhabitants of Charlottesville deserve too well of that...
Mr. De La Borde de Mereville presente ses respects a Miss Jefferson et la prie de venir prendre le thé chez lui vendredi prochain 23, à six heures du soir. RC (Mrs. Nicholas P. T. Burke, Boston, 1947); addressed.
We have been, my ever dearest Martha , now weather bound at this place since Sunday was sennight. we were then to have set off on our return home, but it began to rain that day, and we have had three regular N.E. rains successively, with intermissions of a single day between each. during the first intermission, mr Flower left us for Monticello , but by the way of the Natural bridge . by him I...
Having not received a letter by yesterday’s post, and that of the former week from Mr. Randolph having announced dear Anne’s indisposition, I am under much anxiety. In my last letter to Mr. Randolph I barely mentioned your being recovered, when somewhat younger than she is, by recurrence to a good breast of milk. Perhaps this might be worthy of proposing to the Doctor. In a case where weakness...
It is now very long since I have had a letter from you. I hope you continue in good health, and attention to the several objects for which I placed you in Philadelphia. I take for granted you go on with your music and dancing, that when your French master can attend, you receive his instructions, and read by yourself when he cannot. Let me know what books you have read since I left you, and...
I write to you, my dear Patsy, from the Canal of Languedoc, on which I am at present sailing, as I have been for a week past, cloudless skies above, limpid waters below, and on each hand a row of nightingales in full chorus. This delightful bird had given me a rich treat before at the fountain of Vaucluse. After visiting the tomb of Laura at Avignon, I went to see this fountain, a noble one of...
I inclose you two of Petit’s receipts. The orthography will amuse you, while the matter of them may be useful. The last of the two is really valuable, as the beans preserved in that manner, are as firm, fresh, and green, as when gathered.—Mr. D. Randolph is at Philadelphia, and well. He delivered me your watch, which I will have ready to send by him. He proposes to set out for Monticello in 8....