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Maria’s letter of July 16. informs me you were all well then. However great my confidence is in the healthy air of Monticello, I am always happy to have my hopes confirmed by letter. The day of my departure is not yet fixed. I hope it will be earlier or later in the first week of September. I know not as yet how I am to get along, as one of my horses is in such a condition as to leave little...
I arrived here this day week, having travelled through the rain of that day rather than stay in disagreeable quarters. I experienced no inconvenience from it. the Marquis Yrujo arrived two days after me, and mr Madison & Genl. Dearborne got here the last night. the latter has left his family in Maine for the winter. Yrujo is said to be very ill, taken two days ago. I inclose a magazine for...
I wrote to each of you once during my journey, from which I returned four days ago, having enjoyed thro’ the whole of it very perfect health. I am in hopes the relaxation it gave me from business has freed me from the almost constant headach with which I had been persecuted thro the whole winter and spring. Having been entirely clear of it while travelling proves it to have been occasioned by...
I inclose you a letter for T. B. Randolph containing his appointment as a Cadet. but the lodgings at the Military school at Westpoint being entirely full, he cannot be recieved there till the 1st. of March. indeed he could do nothing there sooner, as their vacation begins with November & ends with February. Genl. Dearborne proposed to me yesterday a new regulation respecting the Cadets. there...
I ought oftener, my dear Martha, to recieve your letters, for the very great pleasure they give me, & especially when they express your affections for me. for though I cannot doubt them, yet they are among those truths which tho’ not doubted we love to hear repeated. here too they serve like gleams of light, to chear a dreary scene, where envy, hatred, malice, revenge, & all the worst passions...
I presume mr Randolph writes to you and informs you he continues well. he has rode twice on horseback; yesterday about 4. miles without feeling it. my fit of yesterday was so mild that I have some hope of missing it to-day. I write this in the morning, but will keep it open till the evening to add the result of the day. we both think we may very safely fix on Monday sennight for our departure,...
Your letter by the post is not yet come to hand, that by Mr. Beresford I received this morning. Your long silence had induced me almost to suspect you had forgotten me and the more so as I had desired you to write to me every week. I am anxious to know what books you read, what tunes you can play, and to receive specimens of your drawing. With respect to your meeting Mr. Simitiere at Mr....
Mr. Randolph’s letter of Dec. 20. from Richmond is the only one come to hand from him or you since your’s from Bizarre of two months ago. Tho’ his letter informed me of the re-establishment of Anne, yet I wish to learn that time confirms our hopes. We were entertained here lately with the ascent of Mr. Blanchard in a baloon . The security of the thing appeared so great that every body is...
The last letter I recieved from you was of the 2d July. In mine of the 14th. inst. to Mr. Randolph I informed him I should set out the next day to Rhode island with the President. I did so, and returned yesterday, after a very pleasant sail of two days going and two days returning thro the Sound. We visited Newport and Providence, where the President was received with great cordiality. He...
I arrived here on Sunday morning (May 30.) to breakfast without having experienced any accident on the road, other than being twice taken in soaking rains: but my water proof coat was a perfect protection. mr and mrs Madison arrived the day after. I find they have not yet got clear of the measles here, so that either at home or here your family will hardly escape it. it is now time for you to...
This is a scolding letter for you all. I have not recieved a scrip of a pen from home since I left it which is now eleven weeks. I think it so easy for you to write me one letter every week, which will be but once in three weeks for each of you, when I write one every week who have not one moment’s repose from business from the first to the last moment of the week. Perhaps you think you have...
I will call for you today, my dear between twelve and one. You must be dressed, because we drink tea with Mrs. Montgomery. Bring your music and drawings. Adieu my dear Patsy. MS not found; text printed from a photostat in NcD ; unsigned, undated, and unaddressed. This note was written with TJ’s left hand, and therefore belongs to some date after 18 Sep., when TJ injured his wrist, and before...
We are all well here, my dear daughter, and Jefferson particularly so. He often repeats that you told a story, ‘that you did,’ when you got into the carriage and said you would come back for him. His cheeks swell with emphasis as he asseverates this. We are just beginning our demolitions, and find they will be very troublesome. It was high time to do it, from the rotten state in which we found...
I recieved yours my dear Martha, of Mar. 31. four days ago. The inoculation at Richmond having stopped that post I send this by the way of Fredsbg. I entirely approve of your resolution to have the children inoculated. I had before been so much convinced of the expediency of the measure that I had taken it for granted before your letter informed me of it. I am called to Philadelphia to a...
I wrote to you this day week and this day fortnight . we have been here in a continued state of fluctuation between the numbers of 40. & 60. a greater proportion of ladies than formerly: but all invalids, and perfectly recluse in their cabins. mr Glendy joined us to-day and will stay till Sunday. we had been many days without venison till the day before yesterday, in the course of which 8....
Mr. Randolph’s letter of Mar. 26. informs me you are all well at Belmont. my last news from Eppington was of Mar. 20. when all were well there. I have myself had remarkeably good health through the winter, since the cold which I took on my way here. the advance of the season makes me long to get home. the first shad we had here was Mar. 16. and Mar. 28. was the first day we could observe a...
Your two last letters are those which have given me the greatest pleasure of any I ever recieved from you. The one announced that you were become a notable housewife, the other a mother. This last is undoubtedly the key-stone of the arch of matrimonial happiness, as the first is it’s daily aliment. Accept my sincere congratulations for yourself and Mr. Randolph. I hope you are getting well,...
I have this day received yours of the 18th. November and sincerely sympathize with you on the state of dear Anne, if that can be called sympathy which proceeds from affection at first hand, for my affections had fastened on her for her own sake and not merely for yours. Still however experience (and that in your own case) has taught me that an infant is never desperate, let me beseech you not...
I was prevented writing to you last week by a bad cold attended with fever: and this week I have nothing to say but that I find myself nearly well, and to repeat the assurances of my love to you. Maria is well, and has come to a resolution to write to you no more. Whether this arises most from resentment or laziness I do not know. Mr. Randolph’s last letter received was of Dec. 29, yours of...
I recieved Anne’s letter by the last post , in which she forgot to mention the health of the family, but I presume it good. I inclose you a medal executed by an artist lately from Europe and who appears to be equal to any in the world. it is taken from Houdon’s bust, for he never saw me. it sells the more readily as the prints which have been offered the public are such miserable caracatures....
I wrote, my dear Martha, by last week’s post to Mr. Randolph. Yesterday I received his of Oct. 31. The fever in Philadelphia has almost entirely disappeared. The Physicians say they have no new infections since the great rains which have fallen. Some previous ones are still to die or recover, and so close this tragedy. I think however the Executive will remain here till the meeting of...
Your’s of the 19. came to hand yesterday. as it says nothing of your health I presume all are well. I recieved yesterday also a letter from Maria of the 18th. she was then well & preparing to go to Eppington, and in about 4. weeks expected to set out for Albemarle. mr Eppes was engaged in his harvest much obstructed by rain, & regretting he had not before deposited Maria at Monticello. I hope...
Mr. Randolph’s convalescence proceeds steadily, not a single circumstance having arisen to throw him back. yet his strength increases slowly. as yet he only rides out in the carriage every day. it will not be till he can get on horseback that we can judge when he will be able to travel. my fits of head-ach have shortened from 9 hours to 5. but they have stuck some days at 5. hours, and when...
Your letters of the 20th. and 27th. Feb. as well as Mr. Randolph’s of the same dates, came to hand only yesterday. By this I percieve that your post must be under bad regulation indeed. I am sorry to learn that your garden is dismantled, and yourself thereby discoraged from attention to it. I beg that Mr. Randolph will employ the whole force, he has been so kind as to direct, in repairing the...
I have got so far, my dear Martha, on my way to Philadelphia which place I shall not reach till the day after tomorrow. I have lost one day at Georgetown by the failure of the stages, and three days by having suffered myself to be persuaded at Baltimore to cross the bay and come by this route as quicker and pleasanter. After being forced back on the bay by bad weather in a first attempt to...
I inclose you a letter from Jefferson which I presume will inform you he is well, and I send you one from Dr. Wistar which will give you satisfaction. be so good as to return it. I had one from Anne 2. or 3. days ago, when all were well. she says they will be with us early in March. I sent you the last week by the post rider your watch, watch key & ring, which I hope got safe to hand. I forgot...
I have received two or three letters from you since I wrote last. Indeed my health has been so bad that I have been able scarcely to read, write or do any thing else. Your letters to your aunt and the others shall be forwarded. I hope you will continue to inclose to me every week one for some of your friends in Virginia. I am sorry Mr. Cimetiere cannot attend you, because it is probable you...
Since I wrote last to you, which was on the 24th. of March, I have received yours of March 22. I am indeed sorry to hear of the situation of Walker Gilmer and shall hope the letters from Monticello will continue to inform me how he does. I know how much his parents will suffer, and how much he merited all their affection.—Mrs. Trist has been so kind as to have your calash made, but either by...
The letter you forwarded , my dear Martha, desiring me to attend the Buckingham court of this month, requires an impossibility because that is tomorrow. I Know also that the trial of the question cannot be at the Same court at which the two wills are presented. Time must be given to Summon witnesses, and I Suppose I shall be Served with a Summons notifying the day I must appear.— We have had a...
We have had no letter from you since your arrival at the Warmsprings, but are told you are gone on to the sweet springs. Not knowing how to write to you by post, I take the opportunity of sending this by Dr. Currie.—He has mentioned to me the home-less situation of Nancy Randolph . She is now with Mrs. Carrington. I do not know whether she is on such a footing with Mr. Randolph and yourself as...