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After four days journey I arrived here without any accident and in as good health as when I left Philadelphia. The conviction that you would be more improved in the situation I have placed you than if still with me, has solaced me on my parting with you, which my love for you has rendered a difficult thing. The acquirements which I hope you will make under the tutors I have provided for you...
I wrote you by the post this day fortnight, since which I have received two letters from you. I am afraid that you may not have sent to the post office and therefore that my letter may be still lying there. Tho’ my business here may not let me write to you every week yet it will not be amiss for you to enquire at the office every week. I wrote to Mr. House by the last post. Perhaps his letter...
I hoped before this to have received letters from you regularly and weekly by the post, and also to have had a letter to forward from you to one of your aunts as I desired in my letter of November 27th. I am afraid you do not comply with my desires expressed in that letter. Your not writing to me every week is one instance, and your having never sent me any of your copies of Mr. Simitiere’s...
Your letter by the post is not yet come to hand, that by Mr. Beresford I received this morning. Your long silence had induced me almost to suspect you had forgotten me and the more so as I had desired you to write to me every week. I am anxious to know what books you read, what tunes you can play, and to receive specimens of your drawing. With respect to your meeting Mr. Simitiere at Mr....
I have received two or three letters from you since I wrote last. Indeed my health has been so bad that I have been able scarcely to read, write or do any thing else. Your letters to your aunt and the others shall be forwarded. I hope you will continue to inclose to me every week one for some of your friends in Virginia. I am sorry Mr. Cimetiere cannot attend you, because it is probable you...
It is now very long since I have had a letter from you. I hope you continue in good health, and attention to the several objects for which I placed you in Philadelphia. I take for granted you go on with your music and dancing, that when your French master can attend, you receive his instructions, and read by yourself when he cannot. Let me know what books you have read since I left you, and...
This will be handed you by Genl. Gates, who going to Philadelphia furnishes me with the opportunity of writing to you. I am again getting my health, and have some expectations of going to Philadelphia ere long; but of this am not certain. I have had no letters from Eppington since I wrote you last, and have not received one from you I think these two months. I wish to know what you read, what...
I have not received a letter from you since early in February . This is far short of my injunctions to write once a week by post. I wish this for my own gratification as well as for your improvement. I received yesterday letters from Eppington by which I learn that the families there and at Hors du monde are well, and that your cousin Cary has a son. Lucy has been unwell during the winter but...
I shall be absent so short a time that any letter you would write to me would hardly get to London before I should be coming away; and it is the more discouraging to write as they open all letters in the post office. Should however sickness or any other circumstance render a letter to me necessary, send it here to Mr. Short and he will direct and forward it. I shall defer engaging your drawing...
I will call for you today, my dear between twelve and one. You must be dressed, because we drink tea with Mrs. Montgomery. Bring your music and drawings. Adieu my dear Patsy. MS not found; text printed from a photostat in NcD ; unsigned, undated, and unaddressed. This note was written with TJ’s left hand, and therefore belongs to some date after 18 Sep., when TJ injured his wrist, and before...
Two of your country-women, Mrs. Barrett and Mrs. Montgomery, will dine with me tomorrow. I wish you could come and dine with them. If you can obtain leave let me know in the morning and I will come for you between one and two o’clock. You must come dressed. Adieu my dear Patsy your’s affectionately, MS not found. Text printed from a photostat of RC in NcU ; the following note appears on the...
I was happy, my dear Patsy, to receive, on my arrival here, your letter informing me of your health and occupations. I have not written to you sooner because I have been almost constantly on the road. My journey hitherto has been a very pleasing one. It was undertaken with the hope that the mineral waters of this place might restore strength to my wrist. Other considerations also concurred....
I received yesterday at Marseilles your letter of March 25. and I received it with pleasure because it announced to me that you were well. Experience learns us to be always anxious about the health of those whom we love. I have not been able to write to you so often as I expected, because I am generally on the road; and when I stop any where, I am occupied in seeing what is to be seen. It will...
I got back to Aix the day before yesterday, and found there your letter of the 9th. of April, from which I presume you to be well tho’ you do not say so. In order to exercise your geography I will give you a detail of my journey. You must therefore take your map and trace out the following places. Dijon, Lyons, Pont St. Esprit, Nismes, Arles, St. Remis, Aix, Marseilles, Toulon, Hieres, Frejus,...
I write to you, my dear Patsy, from the Canal of Languedoc, on which I am at present sailing, as I have been for a week past, cloudless skies above, limpid waters below, and on each hand a row of nightingales in full chorus. This delightful bird had given me a rich treat before at the fountain of Vaucluse. After visiting the tomb of Laura at Avignon, I went to see this fountain, a noble one of...
Your letter of May 3. came to me at this place. Since this I hear nothing from you; but I hope your health is reestablished. I have received letters from America as late as March assuring me that your sister shall be sent this summer. At that time however they did not know certainly by what occasion she could come. There was a hope of getting her under care of the French Consul and his lady,...
I send you, my dear Patsy, the 15 livres you desired. You propose this to me as an anticipation of five weeks allowance. But do you not see my dear how imprudent it is to lay out in one moment what should accomodate you for five weeks? That this is a departure from that rule which I wish to see you governed by, thro’ your whole life, of never buying any thing which you have not money in your...
Madame de Traubenheim wrote me word yesterday you were unwell. I shall come to Panthemont to-day to pay her a visit, and to bring you to dine, if well enough. Let me know by the bearer if you are well enough to come out. Make it a rule hereafter to come dressed otherwise than in your uniform. Our dear Polly was to sail certainly the 1st. of May. She must therefore be arrived in England now....
I shall with the greatest pleasure, my dear Patsy, participate with you of the honour of Miss Annesley’s company in our ride this afternoon. Assure her of my thankfulness for it as well as your own. The day being warm, I shall not be with you till between five and six o’clock. Adieu my Dear Your’s affectionately, RC (John R. Burke, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 1956); addressed: “A Mademoiselle...
Madame de Corney proposes, my Dear to carry you to the Opera tomorrow evening. I will therefore call for you precisely at five oclock. Be ready without fail before that hour. Know exactly at what hour they will shut your doors in the evening, and as you come down to the carriage see exactly what oclock it is by the Convent clock that we may not be deceived as to the time. Adieu. Yours’...
Mr. De La Borde de Mereville presente ses respects a Miss Jefferson et la prie de venir prendre le thé chez lui vendredi prochain 23, à six heures du soir. RC (Mrs. Nicholas P. T. Burke, Boston, 1947); addressed.
I saw in Philadelphia your friends Mrs. Trist and Miss Rittenhouse. Both complained of your not writing. In Baltimore I enquired after Mrs. Buchanan and Miss Holliday. The latter is lately turned methodist, the former was married the evening I was there to a Mr. Turnbull of Petersburg in Virginia. Of course you will see her there. I find it difficult to procure a tolerable house here. It seems...
I wrote you last on the 4th. instant. In my letter of the 19th. to Mr. Randolph I inclosed one to you from England. I now send a packet from France, which comes from Botidour. I have now been seven weeks from you my dear and have never heard one tittle from you. I write regularly once a week to Mr. Randolph, yourself, or Polly, in hopes it may induce a letter from one of you every week also....
Your’s of the 25th. of April came to hand ten days ago, and yesterday I received Mr. Randolph’s of the 3d. instant. When I wrote to him last week, I hoped to have been soon rid of the periodical headach which had attacked me. It has indeed been remarkeably slight since that, but I am not yet quite clear of it. I expect every fit to be the last. I inclose the newspapers for Mr. Randolph. He...
Your favor of May 28. from Eppington came to me yesterday, with the welcome which accompanies ever the tidings I recieve from you. Your resolution to go to housekeeping is a good one, tho’ I think it had better be postponed till the fall. You are not yet seasoned to the climate, and it would therefore be prudent not to go to a sickly position till the sickly season is over. My former letters...
My last news from you were conveyed in your letter of May 28. I ascribe this to your present ambulatory life. I hope when you are more in the way of the post, I shall receive letters regularly once a week from one or other of you, as I write regularly once a week myself. In my letter of the last week to Mr. Randolph I mentioned the appearances of a war between England and Spain. We have...
I recieved two days ago yours of July 2. with Mr. Randolph’s of July 3 . Mine of the 11th. to Mr. Randolph will have informed you that I expect to set out from hence for Monticello about the 1st. of September. As this depends on the adjournment of Congress and they begin to be impatient, it is more probable I may set out sooner than later. However my letters will keep you better informed as...
Congress being certainly to rise the day after tomorrow, I can now, my dear Patsy, be more certain of the time at which I can be at Monticello, and which I think will be from the 8th. to the 15th. of September: more likely to be sooner than later. I shall leave this about a fortnight hence, but must stay some days to have arrangements taken for my future residence in Philadelphia. I hope to be...
The last letter I recieved from you was of the 2d July. In mine of the 14th. inst. to Mr. Randolph I informed him I should set out the next day to Rhode island with the President. I did so, and returned yesterday, after a very pleasant sail of two days going and two days returning thro the Sound. We visited Newport and Providence, where the President was received with great cordiality. He...
In my letter of last week to Mr. Randolph I mentioned that I should write every Wednesday to him, yourself and Polly alternately, and that my letters arriving at Monticello the Saturday and the answer being sent off on Sunday I should recieve it the day before I should have to write again to the same person, so as that the correspondence with each would be exactly kept up. I hope you will do...