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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Martha Jefferson" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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Cornelia will probably give Virginia a detail of our Journey to the Natural Bridge —for me it was a complete chapter of accidents—my misfortunes began the day I left home and have not yet ceased, for a cold caught I believe in crossing the blue ridge settled upon my face and has kept me in almost constant agonies—I have not been free of pain one moment for the last eight and forty hours and...
I inclose the within, to you, my dearest daughter & friend, because it is of great consequence, to be put into the post office at Charlottesville from which place it will go safer to Staunton than from hence. Ellen writes to you and of course will give the news of this place if she can muster up any. the history of our expedition to the Natural bridge she will write you of course. the sun,...
Ellen tells me that a request is communicated thro’ M r Randolph & yourself from the Freemason societies of Charlottesville to be permitted to lay the first brick of the Central college . I do not know that I have authority to say either yea or nay to this proposition; but as far as I may be authorised, I consent to it freely. the inhabitants of Charlottesville deserve too well of that...
Johnny’s arrival gave us great pleasure as we began to be very anxious to hear from you, and I thank you very much for having spared time to write such a long letter. the head of Christ is really a great curiosity, Grand-papa is almost as much pleased with it as we are, and considers it extremely ingenious & original. it is certainly a very fine face and the character is so decided that I...
I arrived here, my dear daughter after a disagreeable journey, one day shut up at Warren by steady rain, the next travelling thro a good deal of drizzle & rain, and the last excessive cold, the road being full of ice. but all well in the end. Johnny Hemings had made great progress in his work. his calculation is that he may possibly finish by this day fortnight, but possibly & almost probably...
The calculation in my former letter of the time when Johnny Hemings would be done, was made on a guess of his own. by what he has since done I can estimate the time it will take him more exactly, and I find the cart need not leave Monticello till Thursday the 11 th of December, on which day therefore I wish it to be dispatched. I have been two days engaged from sunrise to sunset with a...
Grandpapa has been taking such a long nap, my dear Mother that I began to despair of getting ink in time to write to you, but he has at last made his appearance, and as I have very little to tell you, I shall in spite of my fatigue, make an effort to write. we did not stop at Warren the first night as we intended, but after dining with M rs Patterson got on to M rs Gibson’s who received us...
All our members, except 3 who came not at all arrived on Saturday morning so that we got to work by 10. aclock, and finished yesterday evening. we are detained till this morning for fair copies of our report. Staunton had 2. votes, Lexington 3. the Central college 16. I have never seen business done with so much order, & harmony, nor an abler nor pleasanter society. we have been well served...
I have heard that D r Cooper has come on to Richmond , which however I doubt. if so he may possibly have come to Monticello . under this uncertainty where a letter may find him, I inclose one to you for him , with a request to forward it to him by mail wherever he is. I have left it open as it may enable you to judge what to do with it in every case. I left Judge Stuart ’s yesterday after...
I wrote to you by our last mail of the 8 th having been now here a week & continued to bathe 3 times a day, a quarter of an hour at a time, I continue well, as I was when I came. having no symptom to judge by at what time I may presume the seeds of my rheumatism eradicated, and desirous to prevent the necessity of ever coming here a 2 d time, I believe I shall yeild to the general advice of a...