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From James Madison to Edmund Randolph, 12 November 1782 (second)

To Edmund Randolph

RC (LC: Madison Papers). Cover addressed to “The honble Edmd. Randolph favd. by Dr. Tucker who will deliver it himself if he can—if not by the hand of Col: Monroe.” This cover was docketed by Randolph, “Novr. 12. 1782 J Madison.” On the fragment of a second cover there appears, certainly not in Tucker’s and seemingly not in Monroe’s hand, “[Ho]nble Edmund Randolph Esqr. Richmond.”

In Congress Novr. 12. 1782

Resolved That the appointment of T. Jefferson Esqr. as a Minist: for Nego: peace made on the   day   be & the same is hereby renewed: & that on his acceptance thereof he be invested with all the powers & subject to all the instructions which have been or may be issued by Congress to the Mints Plenip[o:] for nego: peace, in the same manner as if his original appt. had taken effect.

This Resolution passed a few minutes ago1 I write you a line for the post but I fear too late2 This catches Doctr. Tucker in the Street proceeding by the State House.3 You will let it be known to Mr. J. as quickly as secrecy will admit. An official notification will follow by the first oppy. This will prepare him for it.4 It passed unan: & witht. a single remark adverse to it.5 On this subjt. again by the post next week or by Col: B. if earlier.6

Adieu.

J. M.

3On Chestnut Street, between Fifth and Sixth streets. See map in Papers of Madison description begins William T. Hutchinson, William M. E. Rachal, et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison (5 vols. to date; Chicago, 1962——). description ends , IV, facing p. 323. Although Dr. Thomas Tudor Tucker (1745–1828), a graduate of the medical school of the University of Edinburgh, had come from Bermuda to Virginia in 1771 with his younger brother, St. George Tucker (Papers of Madison description begins William T. Hutchinson, William M. E. Rachal, et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison (5 vols. to date; Chicago, 1962——). description ends , IV, 306, n. 5), he had settled in Charleston, S.C. He represented South Carolina in the Continental Congress (1787–1788) and the federal Congress (1789–1793). From 1801 until his death he was treasurer of the United States (Beverly Randolph Tucker, Tales of the Tuckers: Descendants of the Male Line of St. George Tucker of Bermuda and Virginia [Richmond, 1942], pp. 9–11). At the time of the present letter, Dr. Tucker was in Philadelphia seeking a ruling about his pay and allowances as a continental surgeon, including his recent services in the hospital at Williamsburg (JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (34 vols.; Washington, 1904–37). description ends , XXIII, 752–53).

4On 13 November Robert R. Livingston wrote to Jefferson, enclosing a copy of the resolution of Congress appointing him as a peace commissioner. Before this dispatch reached Jefferson on 25 November, he had been told by Randolph, soon after the receipt of the present letter, that the appointment had been made (Boyd, Papers of Jefferson description begins Julian P. Boyd et al., eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (17 vols. to date; Princeton, N.J., 1950——). description ends , VI, 202, 207 n.; Randolph to JM, 22 November 1782).

6JM’s note to Randolph of 14 November (q.v.), as well as Livingston’s dispatch mentioned in n. 4, above, were carried by Theodorick Bland. See also JM to Randolph, 12 November (first letter), and n. 5; 14 November 1782.

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