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I received last evening your letter of 5. May, and having written you twice within a fortnight have now not much to say.—But I cannot forbear to give you my best thanks for your care relative to my affairs both at Boston and New York, as well as your own use and employment of the authority which I gave you to draw in my behalf—I fully approve of all your proceedings. I have this day drawn upon...
Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 243. John Church Hamilton states that H wrote to members of George Washington’s cabinet on this date. No further evidence of this correspondence, however, has been found.
The President of the U S. requests the Secy of State, the Secy of the treasury, the Secy of War and the Atty. general to take into consideration the state of the nation and its foreign relations especially with France. These indeed may be so connected with these, with England Spain Holland and others that perhaps the former cannot be well weighed without the other. If our Envoys extraordinary...
With Mr. Davis’s report of the 8th I enclose all the papers relative to the complaint of Mr Liston against Capt Laskey & Capt Mugford & am Sir your most obedient I return also Carnots pamphlet. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
By The President’s direction B. Dandridge respectfully transmits to the Secy of State a Memorial of sundry merchants of New York—The President requests the Secretary to return an answer to the Letter from the Committee, which accompanied the Memorial, informing them that the most pointed & strong remonstrances have been made against the Conduct of which they complain. B.D. also encloses a...
In the Estimate laid before Congress at their last Sessions, I included as an Anticipation of the late Superintendant of Finance the Amount of a draft issued by him in your favor on the late Receiver of Taxes for the State of New York for Fifty thousand Dollars no part of which appears to have been paid. The circumstances attending this Anticipation not being sufficiently known by the...
Captain Ford & Lady arrived here yesterday: they left Niagara the 13th ulto & came by the way of Oswego. He gives me some information of things which took place after we left that country, and which, as they probably will be new to you, I herewith communicate them. He says that Talbot, Brant and Shehan had arrived at Niagara some days before he sailed: that they informed the Governor, that as...
As I shall have occasion to remove Colo. Rawlins’s Corps from Fort Frederick in Maryland, (where they are guarding the prisoners,) to Fort Pitt, I must request the Board to call upon Governor Johnston of Maryland to furnish a Militia Guard to releive Colo. Rawlins. I wish no time may be lost in making the requisition, and that the Governor may be informed of the necessity of sending the Releif...
The president of the U.S. requests the Secretary of State to prepare copies of the remaining papers of our late Envoys to France to be laid before congress at an as early day as possible MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The enclosure, contained in Colo. Henleys letter to me (which with the letter itself is forwarded) needs no comment. Had it come to me as a confidential communication, the transmission of it to you, might have been attended with some embarrassment; but as it is free from this, I have no hesitation in making the government acquainted with this transaction. The presumption indeed, and I hope the...
I received your favor of the 12th only on the 20th. Gen. Dickerson introduced to me at Philadelphia Mr. Evan Jones, whose appearance deportment, & conversation were such as might be expected from a brother of that family—such as might be expected from Gen Dickerson’s recommendation. I am perfectly satisfyed that you should give him a commission as consul, provided you think it can be done...
I have recd your private Letter of the 11th. which contains matter of importance, but unnecessary to be considered and answered particularly by me, because I have in another Letter written this morning referred the whole Subject to your final decision. The manual Exercise of Writing has become almost as painfull to me, as a blow upon the Elbow or the Knee, which induces me to Spare almost...
Colo. Pickering will attend to the Suggestion of Mr McHenry, & then Return the letter, directed to Colo. T. Blount back, as requested. If there are any authorities which can be consulted on the Remonstrance of Mr Vear, it might be well to have recourse to them. The opinion I gave was from what I conceive to be consistent with propriety and us but, though I have no reason to it, it is always...
I last night received your favor of the 10th: Mr Liston’s note of the 8th was not inclosed as you intended. Mr. Barclay I know & his Exequator will be ready. Mr. Moodie I know not, nor do I know or suspect any objection to him. I thank you for the account of the tryal of Fries, which if it was attended to by as numerous a concourse of people in Philadelphia, as it would have been in some other...
I thank you for the favor of your letter of 24 June, & the copies inclosed of dispatches from Stevens & Maitland, which I suppose it is unnecessary for me to return. The necessary alterations in the proclamation will of course be made by you, with the advice of the heads of department. Harmony with the English in all this business of St. Domingo, is the thing I have most at heart. The result...
As I cannot, without peculiar inconvenience to my private concerns, remain in this City beyond sunday next, I desire that all the business in your department which calls for my immediate attention, may be presented to me in the course of this week. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I wish to know whether General Du Portail has made any Arrangements with you respecting Planks for Plattforms, and in that case, what Measures have been taken in consequence. General Du Portail will be able to inform what number of feet will be wanted, and General Knox at what Mills, and by what mode they may be favoured. I enclose a Copy of the Estimate of Articles, which will be required...
His Excellency wishes for the pleasure of your Company at dinner to day, if you are not particularly engaged. The General Officers are expected at Head Quarters, and if there should be time, His Excellency proposes laying before those who were at York Town some Matters, on which he also wishes to take your sentiment—I have the honor to be Sir Your Most Obed. Servt DNA : RG 93—Manuscript File.
The inclosed protest & certificates I received last night with the letter from Capt. Ebenezer Giles, late commander of the schooner Betsey. This gentleman made me a visit some weeks ago, to complain to me in person of the horrid treatment he received from the commander of the Ship Daphne, a British vessel of war. He has now sent me the papers & expects that government will espouse his cause. I...
I am directed by The General to inform you in confidence, that the army will march from its present ground as soon as the weather permits. You will make your arrangements accordingly. When the weather clears, if you will call at Head Quarters, you will be informed of the particular disposition. I am D Sir   Yr. Obed ser ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Pickering had succeeded Major...
I communicated your letter to Mr. Jay & now give you our joint sense. Considering the nature of the transaction and what must necessarily have been presumed to be the intent, & that the authority is on a public subject & between two nations, we think that a decision by two out of three commissioners must be sufficient. We know nothing but an immediate personal interest in property which may be...
Did Mr Liston furnish the letter you asked of him, in favor of Cap: Talbots agency, to the West Indies? Has any Representation been made to him, independent of that application, consequent of the evidence you have recd of the Impressment of our Seamen? When I left Philadelphia, it was expected, & from Mr & Mrs Liston themselves, that they were to follow us in ten days; and allowing a few days...
Inclosed is a letter from Joseph Covachich at Barcelona requesting to be consul at Marseilles which you will please to file among other applications to be considered in due time I am Sir &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Your letter of the 12th Ulto came duly to hand, but the expectation that Congress would rise sooner than it really did, in the first place; and the supposition that Mr Craik would return home, so Soon as [it] did rise in the next, have delayed my acknowledgment of its receipt, and giving direction relative to the money paid you on my A/c by Judge Addison, until now. But learning from Doctr...
If the Boats which were with the Army, have not yet been brought on to Kings-Ferry, His Excellency requests no time may be lost in having it done, by impressing Teams, or other the most efficacious means; and that they may be forwarded to Murderers Creek immediately, to be laid up there, together with such Boats as may be sent from West Point in consequence of the General Order of the...
I am this moment favored with yours of this date, & thank you for the information it contains. It was proper to publish the news in Mr. Humphry’s letter. I return you Mr. Kings, as well as his. The assurances you propose to convey through Mr. King to the court of Denmark, that their consul will be cordially received are very agreeable to me.—I hope to meet you in Philadelphia on the course of...
Be so good as to urge the bringing forward the boats; there is no time to be lost. They ought to be with the others by Wednesday evening, if possible. Yr. very hum serv I think I mentioned to you in my first note, that the boats would be by this time at Dobbes ferry. ’Tis there the teams must go. ALS , RG 93, Miscellaneous Records, National Archives. These boats were being assembled for the...
I have just now, recd. your favour of the 6th. I am glad Mr. Winchester has accepted his Commission. I return your Sons Extract from Liancourts Travels. Who could have put into his head, falsehoods so absurd and so gross? It could not be Simcoe. Absurd as he often was he could not have been guilty of this folly which is almost too palpable for our own Jacobinical Prints. Why have We no Copy of...
I enclose the translation of the letter which was transmitted to the Secretary of War by the Governor of New York—The translation was made yesterday in great haste, and if it should not be sufficiently clear, referrence had better be had to the original, in the possession of the Secy of War. The President wishes, in your conversation with Colo. Louis, that you would learn the precise time of...
You no doubt have seen my pamphlet respecting the conduct and character of President Adams. The press teems with replies, and I may finally think it expedient to publish a second time. In this case I shall reinforce my charges by new anecdotes. My friends will no doubt be disposed to aid me. You probably possess some which are unknown to me. Pray let me have them without delay. You will...
I send you the dispatches for Millet—There are among them two letters—one for Morris Town and one for Baskenridge which he is to deliver—they are of consequence and therefore be pleased to give him a charge respecting them. His Excellency only wishes to have four more Boats upon Carriages, If you can have them mounted from those upon the North River—the remainder may be all sent up above the...
In the public letter which accompanies this you will receive such instructions for your conduct in your mission to the Seneca Tribe of Indians, as may without impropriety be communicated to them—Some others shall here be added more peculiarly proper for your own ear. It is particularly desireable that they be made to understand that all business between them and any part of the United States...
If the detachment now forming, pursues its object, it will be a strong additional motive against having deposits at, and upon the Morris Town Road to this place; because the Troops now on that communication will be considerably reduced, without the means of replacing them. If therefore my former order on this head is not fully complied with no time should be lost in the completion of it. A...
I return you Mr. Kings letters of July 28th. August 1 & 5 inclosed in yours of Oct 3d. received yesterday: These letters are very important & some of them should be made publick. With great esteem &c MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Resolved, that The President of the United States be requested to cause to be laid before this House, the Treaty mentioned in his communications to both Houses of Congress, at the opening of the present Session, as having been negotiated with certain Indian Nations northwest of the river Ohio. By the President’s order B. Dandridge respectfully transmits to the Secy of State the above copy of a...
I return to you my answer to the volunteer corps of the Infantry at Lancaster. I pray you to communicate this to Mr. McHenry that he may send the commissions. I am &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The last Mail brought me your favour of the 24th instant, covering a letter from General Kosciuszko. And presuming that the Attorney General is on his way to Virginia, I hope to receive, soon, the Packets you committed to his charge. Not knowing where Genl Kosciuszko may be, I pray your care of the enclosed to him, as it is probable his movements will be known to you. It is with extreme regret...
I have received your private letter of the 11th, which contains matter of importance, but unnecessary to be considered & answered particularly by me, because I have in another letter, written this morning, referred the whole subject to your final decision. The manual exercise of writeing has become almost as painful to me, as a blow upon the elbow, or the knee, which induces me to spare almost...
[ Philadelphia, August 23, 1791. On August 26, 1791, Pickering wrote to Hamilton : “I have received … your letter of the 23d instant.” Letter not found. ] Pickering had been appointed Postmaster General on August 12, 1791.
Colo. Bell of Charlottesville called on me yesterday and informed me that he had recieved your appointment as postmaster at that station, which however he found himself obliged to decline accepting, on account of his frequent absences from home, rendered necessary by his commercial affairs. It was certainly impossible to have named a fitter person, if he would have undertaken it. In the event...
It is His Excellency’s wish that you should if possible accommodate Lieut. Scudder who is lately returned from Canada with a Horse to go to his home near Elizabeth Town. I am Yr most obt Servt DNA : RG 93—Manuscript File.
I have received your favor of Oct 18 & pray you when you see Gen. Pinckney to congratulate him for me on his arrival; but I would not wish him to think of a journey here to see me. I shall see him I hope e’er long at Trenton or Philadelphia. The two letters returned in yours are important. The first has made a great impression on me. Inclosed is another letter which I pray you to decypher &...
To the Quarter Master General, or Deputy Qr Mr with the Army. In all cases on the present march, where the Draught Horses or Cattle of the Army shall fail, or where an addi ti onal number shall be absolutely necessary, & cannot be procured by hire, or in any other way except by Military Force; you are hereby authorised & directed to impress such numbers of Horses or Oxen as shall be required...
You have been directed to furnish the Commanding Officer of the Boats with materials for muffling the Oars. to pay particular attention that they are in good order—well provided with oars—mounted on good Carriages and in such a manner that they cannot be injured—that the Horses are with them by Thursday 12 OClock—that they are then removed through the Notch below the mountain, there to remain...
By Comand of His Excellency, I give you the followg Extract from a Letter just received from Genl Schuyler—dated Poughkeepsie 25th instant. "As our Boards are all of the Length of 14 feet, I find they will Work to the best Advantage if the Boats are 32 feet instead of 35 feet long—& that each Boat will require 12 lb. of 20d. Nails—14 lb. of 10d.—& 8 lb.—of 8d. Nails. If the Nails & Oakum...
This is merely intended to let you know that, your two letters, the one official, the other private, of the 30th ulto have both been received. If the Authors of such resolutions as are forwarded to me, relative to the Treaty with G. Britain mean well they will be benefited by such sentiments as you have communicated to Judge Walton: for nothing short of profound ignorance, or consummate...
The enclosed Instructions for Mr Ellicot (as now amended) are approved—I was out when they came, or they would have been returned sooner. MHi .
I received upon my Arrival here your favour of the 25th with the Commissions, all of which I have signed and My son will transmit them to you. The Weather was yesterday so hot, that I came very nigh destroying my Horses, and is not moderated this morning. I am, Sir your most obedient / and humble servant ICU : Miscellaneous Papers.
I thank Mr. Bordley kindly for his Book and you for your care and trouble in Sending it. I have a great Opinion of Mr. Bordleys Experience, skill and Knowledge in Husbandry and should have great delight in trying his Experiments, if I was not obliged to recollect and apply to myself President Washingtons Words to me, a few days before he went out and I came in. “Sir, I have read nothing these...
I have recd. your Favour of the 16th. The Speech of Pastoret I had before received by two Conveyances from France, from an old Acquaintance, whom I had not heard from, before for thirteen Years. The Applications from Dr. Hall, and General Miller as well as that of Col. Francis Nicholls mentioned in your Letter of the 12th, and those of Mr. Huger and Dr. Conover mentioned in your two Letters of...