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    • Washington, George
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    • Morris, Robert
    • Morris, Robert
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Morris, Robert" AND Recipient="Morris, Robert" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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The present conveyance is sudden & unexpected. I have only time therefore to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of the 29th Ulto and to assure you, that I felt a most sensible pleasure, when I heard of your acceptance of the late appointment of Congress to regulate the Finances of this Country—My hand & heart shall be with you, and as far as my assistance will, or can go, command it. We...
I have recd your favors of the 15th and 21st. Your opinion of the absolute necessity of a repeal of all tender laws, before a new species of paper, tho’ upon even so good an establishment, will gain credit with the public, is certainly founded upon reason and justified by experience. I am in hopes that most if not all the Legislatures have at length seen the fatal effects of those laws and...
In consequence of a request from me to Mr Lowrey, that he would continue to purchase and forward Flour to the utmost extent of his Commission, he informs me that he has compleated the purchase of 2000 Barrels and that he has began upon that of 1000 more; but of this he desires me to give you notice; meaning I suppose that you may put a stop to it, if it should not meet your approbation. I have...
your favors of the 2d and 5th Instants have afforded me infinite satisfaction, as the measures you are pursuing for subsisting the Army perfectly accord with my Ideas, and are, I am certain, the only ones which can secure us from distress or the constant apprehensions of it. Had magazines of any consequence been formed in the different States, in pursuance of the late requisitions of Congress,...
I have been honored with yours of the 23d ulto. I take the earliest opportunity of informing you that our whole dependence for Flour is upon you. The State of New York it is said has a considerable quantity yet within it, but so exhausted are the resources of the Legislature that they can command none of it. New Jersey has not either passed laws to draw forth the specific supplies demanded of...
The expectation of the pleasure of seeing you has prevented me hitherto from making a communication of a most important and interesting nature—But circumstances will not admit of further delay, and I must trust it to paper. It seems reduced almost to a certainty, that the enemy will reinforce New York with part of their troops from Virginia—In that case the attempt against the former must be...
There are 311 Barrels of Salt Beef at Portsmouth in New Hampshire, which, to save land Carriage, I had directed to be sent to Providence by Water, but Mr president Weare writes me that the risque is too great, as there are a number of privateers in that quarter—I have therefore informed him that you will dispose of it on the spot and procure a like quantity in Philada. I shall be obliged to...
Inclosed is the Copy of a letter which I have just recd from Capt. Mitchell commanding the post at Wyoming, representing his distress for provision. As this post was to have been supplied by Pennsylvania, and as you have now undertaken to furnish the supplies required of the state, I must request you to take the speediest means of giving relief to the Garrison—The quantity of provision which I...
I have in confidence imparted to you the alteration of our late plan and made you acquainted with our intended operations—Besides the provision necessary at the Head of Elk to carry the troops down the Bay a very considerable Quantity will be wanted in Virginia. I should suppose three hundred Barrels of Flour—as many of salt Meat and eight or ten Hhds of Rum would be sufficient at Elk—For what...
I have devoted the first moment of my time which I could command (while the Troops are halted for the french Army at this place) to give my sentiments unreservedly on the several matters contained in your favor of the 13th Inst.—this I will attempt to do, with all that frankness, & sincerity, which from your own candor in your communications, you have a right to expect, and for doing which...
Immediately after you left Camp, I applied to Mr Tarlé the French Intendant and requested to know the quantity of Flour which he could spare us and where he would wish to have it replaced. I have not been able to ascertain either of these points, but from a conversation which passed yesterday between Mr Tarle and Colo. Stewart on the subject, I do not imagine we shall obtain more than 1000 or...
Accounts brought by several Vessels to Philada and to the Eastward leave little doubt but that the Count de Grasse must have already arrived in the Chesapeak, or that he must be very soon there—The Count de Rochambeau and myself have therefore determined that no time ought to be lost in making preparations for our transportation from Trenton to Christiana and from the Head of Elk down the...
Every Day discovers to me the increasg Necessity of some Money for the Troops—I hope by this Time you are provided to give a Month’s Pay—I find it of the last Importance to hasten forward myself—to join the Marquis as soon as possible—I may leave this in a few Hours—I cannot do It however, without intreatg you in the warmest Terms to send on a month Pay at least—with all the Expedition...
Capt. Machin of the Artillery is detached to pursue some deserters from that Corps—he will have occasion for some money for expences—If you can advance him about £10 it will be sufficient, & will oblige the public as well as Dr Sir Yrs DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have received your two favrs of Yesterday No. 1 & 2. I find myself so pressud by Circumstances, that It will be impossible for me to stay at this Place ’till the Payment of the Money comitted to M. Audibert can be effected—I must leave the Head of Elk this Afternoon or early Tomorrow Morng—I shall however leave Instructions with G en . Lincoln to do all that is necessary on the Occasion. The...
It is of such essential consequence, in my opinion, that the Army should be regularly supplied with Rum during the present operation, that I cannot forbear interesting myself on the subject. When we take into consideration how precious the lives of our men are, how much their health depends upon a liberal use of Spirits, in the judgment of the most skillful Physicians, who are best acquainted...
I use the present Opportunity to return to you the Bill drawn in my Favor on Messrs Richards & Comp y of New London—not having had an Opportunity to present it for Payment. Your Note of the 18th I have received, with your Letter directed to Major Genl Greene—the first good Opportunity will be improved for its, conveyance. With great Regard & Esteem I am Dear Sir Your St DLC : Papers of George...
Colo. Harrison of the Artillery, who will deliver you this—is going to Philadelphia on public Business, important to the general Service—as the Southern Department to which he belongs has been long destitute of Money—I shall be very glad if you can furnish him with a Sum sufficient for his Expences & that of another Officer who will be necessary on this Occasion. I am &c. P.S. Being Informed...
I have just now been honored with your two Favors of the 17th & 19th Instant ⅌ Mr Ridley—I have had the pleasure to take your two Boys by the Hand & Welcome them to Virginia—for my Countrys sake, I rejoice in the Sacrifice you are makg to your own feelings for the Education of the young Gentlemen —your Sons—in whose Behalf I have taken the Liberty to enclose your Letter to the Count de Grasse;...
I have to inform you that a very considerable debt has been incurred upon you as Financier of the United States by an Order for the Releif of the Officers of the Army from the Goods found in York Town—each Officer military & Staff having been authorized to take up on public Acco. the Sum of £20 in Virginia Currency for which Mr Ross, Commercial Agent of this State, is answerable to the...
I inclose you for acceptance my two drafts for you in favr of Mr David Ross Commissioner of Trade for the State of Virginia one for £7452.12 0 1/2 Stirling—the other for £6035.17 2 1/2 Stirling—which two sums are for the Amount of the Goods purchased of the British Merchants in York and delivered out to the Officers of the Army—Mr Ross’s letter to me which was laid before you this morning...
Knowing full well the multiplicity & importance of yr business, it would give me more pain than pleasure if I thought your friendship, or respect for me did, in the smallest degree, interfere with it.—At all times I shall be happy to see you, but wish it to be in your moments of leizure—if any such you have. Mrs Washington, myself and family, will have the honor of dining with you in the way...
I have recd your favr of the 23d respecting Capt. Hutchins and shall give you a more difinitive answer after I have seen that Gentleman. By a letter which General Lincoln addressed to me before he went to the Eastward, I find that you approve of my plan of sending Officers to the four New England States, particularly, with the Returns of the deficiencies of Troops, and with instructions to...
On examination I find the Map of the Southern States shewn me by Capt. Hutchins much too general to answer any Military purpose I therefore think that Gentlemans presence at the Southward very necessary and should be glad if a necessary sum of Money could be furnished to enable him to proceed there without delay. I am. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
It appears to me but reasonable that an Officer under Major Mcphersons circumstances, acknowledged by no State and belonging to no Corps should be put upon the same footing in respect to his depreciation of pay as the Foreign Officers in our service were. I have the honor to be&c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been honored with yours of the 26th ulto preparing a plan of providing the Officers with Cloathing—I approve of it generally, and think it will have a happy effect. I will only beg leave to make this remark, that the amount of two Months pay of subalterns will be scarcely sufficient to enable them to purchase a sufficiency of the Articles necessary for the genteel equipment of an...
I do myself the honor to inclose Capt. Van Heers Estimates of the sums in his opinion sufficient to recruit—mount and accoutre his Corps—Agreeable to your desire I applied the beginning of this month to the President and Council for an advance of a sum of Money for recruiting, upon this principle, that as the Men would be raised in the state and considered as part of its Quota, it appeared to...
Well knowing the difficulties in which you are involved it ever gives me pain to make application to you on the score of Money. But as I cannot give the Baron Steuben an answer without knowing whether it will be in your power to comply with the terms he asks, I am under the necessity of inclosing his letter to me on the subject of the arrearages of his Pay.I am with great Respect Sir Yr most...
Major Genl Baron Steuben proposes to leave Town next week and has again applied to me on the subject of his former Letter—I think his situation peculiar and such as to call for Some attention to his request and I would wish you to comply with it, so far as is consistent with your other arrangements. I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been honored with your favor of this Morning. I will make an experiment with your drafts upon Mr Swanwick which I doubt not may be disposed of among the trading people in New York and New Jersey. The smaller the Bills are the more easily will they be negociated—The sum of 4000 dollars will be sufficient—at one time. I have the honor to be &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.