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Permit me to introduce to your Acquaintance and civilities Benjamin Beal Junr. Esqr., a Son of my next Neighbour. This young Gentleman has been educated at our University and to the Law in the Practice of which he has Spent Some years but finding the Multiplication of Professors in proportion to the diminution of the Business, he has thought proper to turn his Attention to travail and to trade...
On Saturday I received the letter your Excellency did me the honor to write me on the 11 of this month, informing me that the Legislature of Virginia by a law passed in 1798, authorized its chief magistrate to cede to the United States the Marine hospital at Norfolk on condition they pay to the contractor, the ballance which was then due him, by the commissioners under whose authority he had...
I have received, Letters from my Family at St. Petersbourg, at two Several Times, under the Seal of The Department of State, and honoured with the Frank of your Name. I ought to have acknowledged the first by the return of the Post: but I hope you will excuse that omission and Accept my Thanks for both at once. I wish you Sir, in your important and difficult office, all the Honour, Comfort and...
I thank you for The Copy of The Presidents Message, and for the Volume of Documents. They do great honour to The President, to his Ministers and Ambassadors: and I rejoice in the Appearance of unanimity they have produced in Congress and in The Nation: which not withstanding all the apprehensions representations and Threats of Divisions, is greater than I have ever known in America for fifty...
I have the honour of your Letter of the 27 Ap. accompanied with one from St Petersbourg, for which, as well as for another which I received Sometime Since; and neglected to acknowledge, I pray you to accept my thanks. I am Sorry you had a moment’s uneasiness on account of the Accident you mention. I wish you had read the whole letter, not for any information in it, but to make you Smile at the...
Does History or Experience, afford an Example, of Such a Phenomenon, as this, now exhibited to Mankind, by our pious, virtuous and patriotic American Republick, whether We view it as a federative Republick, or whether We consider the Single and Simple Parts that compose the whole? The dread, of Taxes, to which all Mankind have a natural Antipathy; the hatred of War, which is Stronger in the...
I thank you for your favour of the 15th, and the able Report of the Committee of foreign relations, and a very conciliatory Bill for the regulation of Seamen &c. I call it conciliatory, because in Theory it Should appear to be So; and because I believe it was sincerely intended to be so. The views were upright and the Motives pure, which produced it, I have no doubt. But will the present...
Your favour of the 10th. of this month has laid me under very great Obligations to you. No intelligence could be more agreable to me, than the information, that the conduct of my Son has the entire approbation of The President. As a public Man I have no views for him, but to such Services as The President Shall assign him. As a private person, though his absence and the loss of his Society is...
I thank you for the frank and friendly communication in your kind letter of the 19th. of the Arrangement for the Negotiations at St. Petersburg. I have no Objection to make to it. The Points of Rank and Ettiquette, of Such vast acknowledged importance in Europe, and felt by every Man in America to be more consequence here than any Man will acknowledge; are So unsettled in this Country, that I...
As you have many Years to live, and are likely to have Buissness enough to do with your Countrymen as long as you live: I Shall claim a merit rather than make an Apology for introducing to you George Ticknor Esqr a Schollar, a Lawyer and a Gentlemen very greatly esteemed in this northern Region. Knowing the imensity of your Burthens at this time I have no wish to increase them: but knowing...
I have to thank you for the Presidents message, and for a pacquet from our fellow Citizen La Fayette. I have also the honour to enclose a letter from C H Robbins, in favour of his brother. There Robinses, are Sons of our once Lieutenant Governor, now Judge of Probate. They are respectable people & have respectable connections. You probably know mr Forbes. There may be many applications from...
Although, our good old Massachusetts, has encore quelques Prejuges; yet I find that all our liberal minded Men have a Strong desire to See our past present and future Presidents. They hesitate not to ask me for Introductions; and I hesitate not to give them; knowing as I do the past, present and future President to be as liberal Men as themselves. They all return So full of Gratitude for their...
All our intelligent Travellers to Washington, I find have an ambition to See both the present, and future President of the United States. I beg leave to introduce to you Colonelt William Sumner and his Sister, Miss Elizabeth Sumner, Children of our late Governor Sumner. Col Sumner has not only the Advantages of the best public Education at Colledge, and the Bar, but of many years service in...
From the tenderness of Friendship and the Weakness of Compassion and humanity, I have promised two Gentlemen to mention their names to you, as Candidates for Mr Daltons late Office, Captain Tucker and Mr Deblois. A Friendship of forty Years with the former, and of fifty Six years with Mr Dalton have deeply interested my Feelings in behalf of both these Gentlemen. But what Signify Feelings when...
From the tenderness of friendship, & the weakness of compassion & humanity, I have promised two gentlemen to mention their names to you as Candidates for mr Daltons late office. Captain Tucker and mr Deblois. A friendship of 40 years with the former & of 56 years with the mr Dalton have deeply interested my feelings in behalf of both these gentlemen. But what signifies feelings when I know...
Another application has been made to me by Mr Elbridge Gerry, the oldest Son of the late Vice President, for a recommendation to the office of Surveyor in Boston. How can I recollect, the laborious Services, the great Sacrifices of a Gerry for forty years, and the destitute Circumstances of his Widow and Children, without Emotion. I told him I had mentioned the Names of Tucker and Deblois;...
In the good old English Language of your Virginian and my New England Ancestors, I am right glad to See you in the oldest Plantation, in old Massachusetts, next to Salem, where you will be recd with more Splendor and I hope with equal Cordiallity. MHi : Elizabeth Smith Scrapbook; Smith-Townsend Family Papers.
I should ask leave without scruple to transmit the enclosed letter to you were it not for the foolish compliment in it to my pretended influence, which you know to be unfounded & therefore may pass over with a smile. I do not hesitate to comply with his request, by enclosing a copy of a letter, I wrote to Mr Madison, on the 2nd. February 1813 nor scruple to say that no opinion or sentiment in...
For the last twenty years I have made it a rule to interfere as little as possible with public affairs. but an occation now presents in which I think it my duty to make a frank, a Candid, a Submissive representation to you—if the Treaty with Spain returns ratifyed there will be commissioners appointed to adjust the claims for Spoilations on our Commerce—there is a Gentleman who I recommend to...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic effluvia of blossoms and roses to Such a degree as to deprive me of the Sight of letters and the feeling of a pen: I Should have long Since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the thirteenth of the month. It is perfectly Satisfactory to me, and it ought to be So and I presume will be So to Dr Waterhouse. I am hapy to hear that your heal t...
Will you please to accept a morsel of rusty Antiquity, which I know you cannot and ought not to be read, because your time is imperiously demanded for occupations more important to your Country and Mankind, as well as to yourself. Your learned, and Ingenious Son-in Law Mr Hay, may possibly have a curiosity to look into it—to him I pray you to present my Respectful Complements.— And believe me...
I ought not o have delaid an acknowledgement of your favour of February 20th. and the Volume of the Journal of the Federal Convention which attended it—The Volume shows that our present inestimable Constitution cost the Venerable Characters who composed it—much anxiety, debate, and difficulty—But a Candid and liberal disposition on all hands resulted in the—“preclarum singulare quiet”—which we...
I ought not to have delaid an acknowledgement of your favour of February 20th. and the Volume of the journal of the Federal Constitution Convention which attended it—the Volume shows that our present inestimable Constitution cost the venerable Characters—who composed it—much anxiety and debate and but a Candid and liberal disposition on all hands, resulted in the “preclarum singulare...
Of the multitude of applications to me for Letters of Introduction and recommendation to the President and Heads of departments, in favour of candidates for Office, I have for a long time Sternly, and Sometimes almost cinically refused them all. But the enclosed letter from Dr Waterhouse has so tenderly affected me that I cannot resist my feelings and Inclination to transmit it to you. I...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic iffluvia of blossoms and roses to such a degree as to deprive me of the right of letters and the feeling of a pen: I should have long since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the 13th of the month. it is perfectly satisfactory to me and it ought to be so and I presume will be so to Dr Waterhouse. I am happy to hear that your health is...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor and his Lady. This Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge, and one of the most conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson, and is highly esteemed by him. I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison he proposes to visit Montpelier as well as Montecello in the...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor & his Lady, this Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge and one of the most Conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson and is highly esteemed by him I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison, & he proposes to visit him Montpelier as well as well as...
upon the 23d of Feb’ry mr Adams addrest a Letter to you, and inclosed a private Letter from my Son at St Petersburgh to me, requesting a return of it by the next Mail. as the Letter has not been received I presume in the multiplicity of buisness, It has been forgotten. You will oblige me by sending it, and at the same time do me the favour to forwarding the packet which accompanies this Letter...
I have this day the pleasure of your Letter of April 10th with the inclosure. The intelligence you have been pleased to communicate to mr Adams, and to me, occasion many reflections in my mind. But with respect, to the path of Duty before me, I have not any hesitation. Early taught to relinquish all personal considerations and enjoyments, at the call of my Country, Surrounded with a young...
I have the honour to state my arrival at this place on the 2nd. instant, returning from St. Petersburg in Russia, where I have been performing the duties of Secretary of Legation, during the residence of Mr. Adams at that Court; and who, upon the receipt of the orders of his Government to repair to Gothenburg, for the purpose of becoming a Member of a Commission to negotiate a Treaty of Peace...